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Summer, 2015
Volume 41, Number 2
  
9 June 2015
Greg Kandra




This Romanian icon of St. Ephrem the Syrian was written in 2005. (photo: Wikipedia)

Today, 9 June, marks the feast of St. Ephrem in the Latin church (it’s celebrated on 28 January in the East). Often called the “Harp of the Holy Spirit,” Ephrem was born in Nisibis — then in the Roman province of Syria — now Nusaybin, Turkey in 306. He spent much of his life preaching and writing hymns and poems:

Ephrem had a complex and artistic personality marked by a strong tendency to be hot-tempered. But with tremendous self-control, he dominated his fiery nature and devoted his life to asceticism.

Ephrem taught in Nisibis until the city was ceded to the Persians and he was forced, with other Christians, to emigrate to Edessa (now Urfa, Turkey). There, Ephrem continued his teaching at the famous School of Edessa whose reknown, and even founding, has been attributed to him.

An aspect of Ephrem’s unusual personality is evident in the fact that, although ordained a deacon, he never became a priest — avoiding consecration by feigning madness. Although no certain explanation can be found for this behavior, some biographers believe it was due to a feeling of unworthiness.

St. Ephrem died in 373, at the age of 67.

A familiar prayer among the Eastern churches remains this brief invocation for Lent:

O Lord and Master of my life, take from me the spirit of sloth, despair, lust of power, and idle talk.

But give rather the spirit of chastity, humility, patience, and love to Thy servant.

Yea, O Lord and King, grant me to see my own transgressions, and not to judge my brother, for blessed art Thou, unto ages of ages. Amen.

At a time when the land so closely associated with St. Ephrem is facing increased turmoil and strife, let us pray that the saint will watch over Syria and Turkey, and help guide all who dwell there on the path to peace.



9 June 2015
J.D. Conor Mauro




Young supporters of pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) celebrate in the streets the results of the legislative election, in Diyarbakir, Turkey, on 7 June. (photo: AFP/Bulent Kilic)

Kurdish election gains are ‘historic’ boost for inclusion in Turkey (Al Jazeera) The surprising success of Turkey’s pro-Kurdish HDP (Peoples’ Democratic Party) in this weekend’s election was a historic moment for one of the country’s — and world’s — longest-persecuted ethnic minorities. By capturing 13 percent of the national vote in Sunday’s poll, the HDP became the first pro-Kurdish political faction to surpass the minimum threshold and gain representation in parliament for Turkey’s 14 million Kurds…

Islamic State: One year on, a brutish regime maintains grip on Mosul (Christian Science Monitor) One year after the Islamic State invaded the Iraqi city of Mosul, its hold on Iraq and neighboring Syria has spread, despite a U.S.-led military campaign to halt the group. Secretly filmed footage of life in Mosul, released by the BBC today, shows the power and control the Sunni Muslim militant group holds over everyday life in the largest city in its self-declared caliphate…

Inside Mosul: What’s life like under Islamic State? (BBC) Exclusive footage reveals how Islamic State wields power over people’s everyday lives in Iraq’s second city, Mosul, a year after it was captured…

Islamic State isn’t just destroying ancient artifacts — it’s selling them (Washington Post) Islamic State militants have provoked a global outcry by attacking ancient monuments with jackhammers and bulldozers. But they also have been quietly selling off smaller antiquities from Iraq and Syria, earning millions of dollars in an increasingly organized pillaging of national treasures, according to officials and experts…

The Journey: Syrian refugee risks life crossing the Mediterranean, Sweden-bound (The Guardian) In the darkness far out to sea, Hashem Alsouki can’t see his neighbors but he can hear them scream. It’s partly his fault. They are two African women — perhaps from Somalia, but now is not the time to ask — and Hashem is spread-eagled on top of them. His limbs dig into theirs. They would like him to move, fast, and so would he. But he can’t — several people are sprawled on top of him, and there’s possibly another layer above them…

Patriarchs met in Damascus to give courage and hope (AsiaNews) Catholic and Orthodox patriarchs of Antioch called for a political settlement of the Syrian crisis and the return of all the people who have been kidnapped and displaced…

Russian Church hopes meeting of Putin, pope will help Middle East Christians (Interfax-Religion) The Russian Orthodox Church believes the upcoming meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Pope Francis may address the peacekeeping initiatives in the Middle East and the other regions, specifically, the issue of the protection of Christians…

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I shares World Oceans Day message (Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople) “Over the past two decades, the Ecumenical Patriarchate and the Orthodox Church worldwide has drawn the world’s attention to the deteriorating condition of our oceans. Now then, more than ever, it is important to recognize the need to respect and protect this invaluable and inalienable resource of our planet, which is the unique source of sustainability and biodiversity, but also the innate cradle of religion and culture…”



Tags: Syria Iraq Refugees Turkey ISIS

8 June 2015
Greg Kandra




Friends and family gather to celebrate an engagement between a young Coptic couple in Australia at Saint George’s Coptic Church in Melbourne. (photo: Sean Sprague)

In 2007, we paid a visit to Australia to report on a land rich in diversity of faith and culture:

I left the world of peroghi and stuffed cabbage in the back of a black Hyundai Sonata — bearing the customized license plate, “COPT 1” — for the Melbourne suburb of Preston. There, I joined Amba (or Bishop) Suriel, Coptic Orthodox Bishop of Melbourne, Canberra, Tasmania, South Australia, Western Australia and New Zealand, at St. Mark’s Coptic Orthodox Church to commemorate the miracle of the Wedding at Cana. After the Divine Liturgy, celebrated in Arabic and Coptic, we traveled further to celebrate the engagement of an Australian Coptic couple.

“We mix with the Anglo-Australian population, and I have Australian friends, though in many ways our lives are quite different from theirs,” said Nariman Eskander, 28, who at age 13 left her native Egypt, home to more than 8 million Coptic Orthodox Christians. Australia’s Copts tend to hang on to their traditional customs and culture, eschewing the drinking and frolicking found in mainstream Australian culture, she said.

The bishop, who is in his late 40’s, noted that parenting has had much to do with the maintenance of such customs among even young Copts.

“My parents had a great influence on me, teaching me to fear God and warning of the traps faced by youth living in Western society,” he said. “My parents realized we must live within God’s commandments in an upright way.”

But even Copts question whether or not their families will remain intact. “Three-quarters of us will probably marry another Copt,” said Ms. Eskander, “though in the future I imagine there will be more intermarriage, and perhaps we will slowly lose our culture.”

Read more about “Diversity Down Under” in the May 2007 edition of ONE.



8 June 2015
Greg Kandra




In the video above, Pope Francis speaks to the people of Sarajevo on Saturday about the importance of interfaith dialogue and the ability of many faiths and cultures in the country
to coexist. (video: CNS)


Pope says interfaith dialogue is a duty (Vatican Radio) Interreligious dialogue is “an indispensable condition for peace” and “a duty for all believers.” That was Pope Francis’ reminder to the people of Bosnia-Herzegovina on Saturday afternoon as he met with leaders of the Muslim, Orthodox, Catholic and Jewish communities gathered in a Franciscan youth centre in Sarajevo...

Eastern Catholic leaders express concern over Ukraine, discrimination (Vatican Radio) Eastern Catholic Church leaders of Europe meeting in Prague say the Family must be a priority in the pastoral work of their respective churches and are expressing their concern over the situation in Ukraine and what they see as borderline “discrimination” against the Church in South-East Europe...

G7 leaders agree to maintain sanctions against Russia (Vatican Radio) Leaders of the Group of Seven of developed economies have agreed to maintain sanctions against Russia until Russian President Vladimir Putin and Moscow-backed separatists fully implement the terms of a peace deal in Ukraine. The Ukraine conflict is dominating the G7 summit, which, among other issues, is also dealing with a long running debt standoff with Greece and trade deals with Asia and the European Union...

ISIS kidnaps Eritrean refugees in Libya (International Business Times) The Islamic State (ISIS) has kidnapped 86 Eritrean refugees in Libya, according to a Swedish-Eritrean activist. Meron Estefanos, human rights activist and co-founder of the International Commission on Eritrean Refugees in Stockholm, told IBTimes UK that the Eritrean refugees, including 12 women and children, were abducted two days ago (3 June) as they were travelling to Tripoli. Most of the kidnapped come from one city in Eritrea, Adi Keih, which is known for its opposition to the regime. “IS militants asked everyone who is Muslim or not and everybody started saying they are Muslims. But you have to know the Koran, and they didn’t,” Estefanos said, citing eyewitnesses who managed to escape...

Dozens die in government air strikes in Syria (BBC) At least 49 civilians, including six children, have been killed in air strikes by government forces in north-western Syria, activists say. The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported that missiles had hit a public square in the rebel-held village of al-Janudiya. Many people had gathered there to go shopping, the group added. Al-Janudiya is situated in the west of Idlib province, which is now almost completely controlled by rebel forces...

Iraqi Knights of Columbus in Canada raise funds for refugees (Catholic Register) When the Islamic State attacked the city of Mosul in June 2014, members of Toronto’s Jesus the King Council of the Knights of Columbus knew they had to respond. “As the first Middle Eastern Christian (Knights’) council with many Iraqi members, we have a moral obligation to help no matter how small our council is,” said Hikmat Dandan in an e-mail to council members. “Remember big things are always started by one or two people...”



5 June 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2008, Bat-El Shmueli plays with her daughter at their home in Haifa.
(photo: Ilene Perlman)


In 2008, we profiled a remarkable group of immigrants in Israel: Ethiopian Jews, some of whom were having difficulty adjusting to their new homeland:

The transition into modern Israeli society has been especially wrenching for older immigrants, said Bat-El Shmueli, E.N.P.’s feisty program coordinator in Haifa and Tirat Hacarmel.

In one of its many programs for Ethiopian adults, Ms. Shmueli helps Ethiopian adults ages 35 to 80 to “learn about life in Israel.”

She said that, for the most part, “they don’t know Hebrew, they don’t have good jobs and they feel distanced from their children who have grown up here and feel and act Israeli.”

Men “often feel powerless, useless, displaced. In Ethiopia they were kings of their homes, villages and communities. Here, everyone tells them what to do.”

According to a recent study by I.A.E.J., 32 percent of Ethiopian-Israeli fathers and 10 percent of mothers are employed; 70 percent of families earn no income, relying entirely on public assistance. Many of those who work do not clear the poverty line.

The fact that more and more Ethiopian-Israeli children have an education and are finding good jobs “is a source of immense pride to their parents, but also a source of alienation,” Ms. Shmueli added.

Read more about “Challenges for a Land of Immigrants” in the November 2008 edition of ONE.



5 June 2015
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis leads Benediction outside the Basilica of St. Mary Major on the feast of Corpus Christi in Rome 4 June. In his homily, he issued a plea to remember persecuted Christians.
(photo: CNS/Paul Haring)


ISIS infiltrates Iraqi Kurdistan (Al Monitor) About two weeks ago, Iraqi Kurdish security forces (asayish) captured another ring of terrorists who were planning a deadly attack on Erbil city. Their ability to effectively obstruct this heinous plot, aided by the brother of one co-conspirer, saved lives and uncovered the identity of the perpetrators: Kurdish residents of Erbil who professed their loyalty to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and were linked together by a mosque and the Internet. The local roots of the plotters — as well as previous ones — indicates ISIS’ societal reach beyond the front-lines of Iraq’s disputed territories. The terrorist group has been able to feed off and radicalize Kurds not only through extreme Salafist ideology but deep grievances tied to economic and political conditions inside the Kurdistan Region of Iraq...

Celebrating Corpus Christi, pope honors persecuted Christians (CNS) The Eucharist is the seal of God’s covenant, uniting Christians and giving them the strength to bring God’s love to others, even when faith carries a high price, Pope Francis said. Celebrating the feast of the Body and Blood of Christ with an evening Mass outside Rome’s Basilica of St. John Lateran 4 June, Pope Francis said the church and its members will never cease being in awe of the Eucharist. As the sun began to set, the Mass was followed by a traditional Corpus Christi procession from St. John Lateran to the Basilica of St. Mary Major, one mile away. Pope Francis asked the faithful as they walked through the city with the Eucharist to remember “our many brothers and sisters who do not have the freedom to express their faith in the Lord Jesus”...

ISIS took their homes. What do they miss most? (CNN) Forced to flee their homes by ISIS’ advance, Iraqis living in a refugee camp in Baghdad’s Jamiaa neighborhood remember the items of daily life that used to bring them most joy...

High inflations makes Ukraine situation worse (The New York Times) While the rest of Europe tries desperately to shrug off low inflation, Ukraine has added rapidly rising prices to its long list of problems during its civil war with Russian-backed rebels. Official inflation figures showed that prices rose 61 percent in April compared with a year earlier. But many prices have doubled and tripled...

Putin to visit pope amid global tensions (RNS) Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet Pope Francis on 10 June, with pressure on the pontiff to speak up about the Kremlin’s role in the Ukraine conflict. The visit, which was confirmed on 4 June by the Holy See’s chief spokesman, Father Federico Lombardi, will be Putin’s second meeting with Francis. The two leaders also met in the Vatican in November 2013. But the ground between Moscow and Rome has shifted significantly in the interim, with Russia annexing the Crimea Peninsula last year and being accused of fomenting the ongoing war in eastern Ukraine...



Tags: Iraq Ukraine Middle East Russia

4 June 2015
Greg Kandra




Young parishioners at Holy Cross Church take part in perpetual adoration in Purakkad, India. Read more about this serene corner of Kerala in “Purakkad’s Natural Harmony” from the
May 2009 edition of ONE. (photo: Peter Lemieux)




4 June 2015
Greg Kandra




This file image shows the dam over the Euphrates River near Ramadi. ISIS has closed off the dam to cut water supplies to towns downstream. (photo: Azhar Shallal/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS cuts off water supplies in parts of Iraq (CNN) ISIS has closed off a dam to the north of the Iraqi city of Ramadi — seized by its forces last month — cutting water supplies to pro-government towns downstream and making it easier for its fighters to attack forces loyal to Baghdad, local officials and residents said...

Israel fears breakup of Syria (U.S. News & World Report) Israeli Deputy Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Yair Golan, who previously headed the Northern Command, addressed a Tel Aviv University conference 1 June to mark 30 years since the Israel Defense Forces’ establishment of the security zone in southern Lebanon. He said, “From a strategic perspective, our situation in the northern arena may be better than ever.” On the other hand, Golan added that Hezbollah now possesses formidable, unparalleled capabilities that no other terrorist organization ever had, and is capable of threatening all of Israel’s population centers. Oh, and that the Islamic State could develop into a “disturbing future threat”...

Ukraine’s president warns of possible “full-scale” invasion (BBC) President Petro Poroshenko has told MPs the military must prepare to defend against a possible “full-scale invasion” from Russia, amid a surge of violence in eastern Ukraine. Russia has denied that its military is involved in Ukraine, but Mr. Poroshenko said 9,000 of its troops were deployed. Clashes involving tanks took place in two areas west of Donetsk on Wednesday...

Grand Imam from Egypt to take part in interfaith conference (Vatican Radio) The Grand Imam of Al Azhar University in Cairo, Muhammad Al-Tayyeb, and other authorities of the Islamic world will be participating in an international conference in Florence, Italy next week to explore the theme “East and West–Dialogues of civilization”...

Eastern Catholic leaders meeting in Europe (Vatican Radio) The annual meeting of the Eastern Catholic hierarchs of Europe is taking place in Prague- Břevnov (Czech Republic), at the invitation of Mgr. Ladislav Hučko, Apostolic Exarch for Byzantine Rite Catholics resident in the Czech Republic. The meeting will take place at the Benedictine Archabbey of St. Adalbert and St. Margaret (Břevnov)...



Tags: Syria Iraq Egypt Ukraine

3 June 2015
Mira Keldani




Children at St. John Paul II Maronite Catholic Church created art, which was auctioned off to
help children in Lebanon (photo: CNEWA)


On Sunday, CNEWA took part in a special event held at St. John Paul II Maronite Catholic Church in Sleepy Hollow, New York. The event brought together nearly 30 people — children, ages 4-12, and their parents — who wanted to raise money for one of CNEWA’s projects in Lebanon.

The children were asked to create some art with the theme of charity, which was then auctioned off. A total of $1,145 was raised. All the proceeds then went to the St. John the Baptist School in Lebanon — specifically, to help support art therapy for disabled children.

It was very touching and humbling to see the enthusiasm of kids and how excited they were to know that their donations will be able to help the less fortunate and disabled children.

The idea was part of the school’s Heritage Program, which seeks to teach children about their roots. The crowd present at the event was most American-Lebanese and Syrian families who were supporting their kids and making sure that stay connected with their home countries and cultures.

Today, Lebanon and Syria are facing one of the most challenging periods of their times but in the eyes of kids everything is possible and hope will always prevail.

We would like to thank the organizers and particularly Mrs. Janine Wakim for her devotion, contributions and a successful event!

To learn how you can join the children of Sleepy Hollow and help children in Lebanon, please visit this giving page.



3 June 2015
Antin Sloboda




Bishop Christian Riesbeck, auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Ottawa, offers a reflection at the beginning of a fundraising breakfast held last Friday in Ottawa, Canada.
(photo: CNEWA Canada)


I would like to share with you some news about a very successful fundraising event which took place last Friday in Ottawa, Canada.

CNEWA Canada in cooperation with a Ukrainian-Canadian community organization, The Ukrainian National Federation of Canada Ottawa-Gatineau Branch, organized a breakfast with a goal to raise funds for families internally displaced by the war in Ukraine.

About 100 people attended. The event brought together CNEWA’s donors, representatives of the Ukrainian-Canadian diasporas and ordinary Canadians from various walks of life who shared a common desire to provide relief for the victims of war in Ukraine.

Bishop Christian Riesbeck, auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Ottawa, officially opened the event with a theological reflection and a prayer. The breakfast’s flow was managed by the event’s MC, Father Peter Galadza, director of the Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies.

Our main speaker was Dr. Andrew Bennett, Canada’s ambassador for religious freedom. In his presentation, Ambassador Bennett shared his insights on the importance of religious freedom in the global context and provided analysis of the challenges to religious minorities on territories that were recently seized by pro-Russian militants. The keynote speaker praised CNEWA’s role in peacebuilding and defense of religious freedom.

The event also featured remarks from members of Canada’s parliament: Jim Eglinski, as a representative of the government of Canada and Paul Dewar, on behalf of the official opposition.

At the conclusion, Carl Hétu, CNEWA Canada’s national director, elaborated on CNEWA’s mission and explained that the funds raised will be used to provide shelter, water, food, clothing and medical supplies to the internally displaced families via regional support centers of Caritas Ukraine, CNEWA’s long-time partner in Ukraine.

We are happy to report that this fundraising breakfast brought in $20,000. This sum adds up to another $20,000 committed by CNEWA Canada for areas with the greatest needs.

Due to the surge of refugees in the Middle East, the problem of internally displaced people in Ukraine has gone largely unreported. (However, you can read a detailed account of the plight of the people of Ukraine in “Casualties of War,” from the Spring 2015 edition of ONE.) Since the beginning of the conflict in Crimea — and later in Donetsk and Luhansk regions — more than one million Ukrainian citizens have had to leave their towns and villages, looking for refuge elsewhere, sometimes in neighboring countries.

To join CNEWA’s efforts to help the people of Ukraine, visit this giving page.

From left to right: Antin Sloboda, Dr. Andrew Bennett, CNEWA Canada’s national director
Carl Hétu. (photo: CNEWA Canada)








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