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Current Issue
Autumn, 2016
Volume 42, Number 3
  
2 December 2016
Greg Kandra




In this image from May, Syrian children from Aleppo play in a shanty near Gaziantep, Turkey. Turkey’s foreign minister on 2 December called for an immediate ceasefire in Syria.
(photo: CNS/Sedat Suna, EPA)


Turkish foreign minister calls for ceasefire in Syria (Reuters) Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu called for an immediate ceasefire in Syria on Friday, describing the situation in Aleppo as critical and saying that President Bashar al-Assad was unfit to rule. Asked about Assad at a news conference in Beirut, Cavusoglu said it was undeniable that the Syrian leader was responsible for 600,000 deaths and that somebody with that record should not be running a country...

Report: Iraqi commanders examined strategy shift to avert Mosul war of attrition (Reuters) Facing brutal urban warfare in Mosul and with their push slowed by the presence of one million residents, Iraqi commanders examined changing strategy last week to help civilians leave to give the army a free hand to strike Islamic State fighters. The proposal, a sign of frustration at slow progress in the six-week campaign against Islamic State in Mosul, was ultimately dismissed by Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and his generals, military sources told Reuters in interviews...

Germany pledges millions for Lebanon refugees (The Daily Star) German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier Friday pledged $10.65 (10 million euros) in aid to Lebanon to help it cope with the Syrian refugee crisis. “We are ready to offer Lebanon the required financial assistance to help it with the financial crisis caused by the Syrian refugees,” Steinmeier said during a news conference with caretaker FM Gebran Bassil...

Metropolitan Tikhon: Orthodoxy in United States attracting converts (Interfax) His Beatitude Metropolitan Tikhon, the Primate of the Orthodox Church in America, arrived in Russia to celebrate the 70th birthday of Patriarch Kirill and All Russia. Anyway, he found some time to meet with an Interfax-Religion correspondent and share his opinion about the recent presidential campaign in the United States, ongoing crisis in Ukraine and tell some interesting facts about Orthodoxy in America...

Pax Christi pushes for new Israeli-Palestinian peace process (CNS) Pax Christi International has called for a new peace process to end violence among Israelis and Palestinians and assure fundamental human rights as defined by international law...

Gaza teenager finds way to generate electricity from candles (RT.com) A teenage girl in Gaza has found a resourceful way of overcoming chronic power shortages, by constructing a device that can generate electricity from the heat of candles, New China TV reports. Faced with regular blackouts, Shahd Abu Lebda, 16, told New China TV that she “depends on the principle that ‘a person in need will find a way’ — which pushed me towards inventing a device that generates electric charges for smart mobile phones from the energy of heat that comes from candles...”



1 December 2016
Greg Kandra




Sister Lutgarda Camilleri cares for children who have been abandoned or even discarded
in Ethiopia. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)


For decades, Sister Lutgarda Camilleri, F.C.J. has been a tireless and devoted caretaker for children in Ethiopia — a true hero who has provided encouragement and love for those most in need at the Kidane Mehret Children’s Home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

When Sister Christian Molidor visited the home in 2001, she described the daunting task facing the sister when she first took over the home:

Sister Lutgarda Camilleri of the Franciscan Sisters of the Heart of Jesus was asked if her community would assume responsibility for the orphanage. Sister Lutgarda was told the sisters had two options: “Take care of the children or throw them back on the streets.”

If Kidane Mehret did not exist, chances are many of the children would have been aborted or died from exposure. The Franciscan Sisters receive what the government considers “reject children.”

Besides caring for the children, the sisters also provide meals twice a week for more than 150 displaced persons from the surrounding area, mostly women and children. Many of the displaced women reciprocate, working in the kitchen, preparing food and serving.

How do the children come to Kidane Mehret? They are often illegitimate. In Ethiopia, the shame of bearing an illegitimate child remains strong. Many children are just left at the gate of the orphanage. Sister Lutgarda told me about a small, very ill boy who was thrown over the fence into the garden. When the gardener went to work the next morning, his first thought was to scold the children for throwing their clothes in the garden. Then the tiny boy started to cry. He was taken into the orphanage. After much difficulty, Sister Lutgarda received government certification for the boy — without such certification, he cannot be adopted.

Over a decade later, the home is still providing sanctuary — and hope. And Sister Lutgarda is continuing her mission. In 2013, journalist Don Duncan interviewed her for ONE:

ONE: How many children does the orphanage house currently?

SL: At the moment, we have the lowest number ever: 80. The government policy has changed. All abandoned children must go to government orphanages now, and no longer come directly to us. I think the policy change is due to child trafficking. The government in Addis Ababa gives the older children to us, especially if they are sick. They come to the sisters because no one else wants them. It is not easy. Many of the older orphans have contracted H.I.V.

ONE: Is H.I.V. — the virus that causes AIDS — an issue for many of your children?

SL: The majority of our children lost their parents to AIDS-related infections. Some were lucky enough not to contract the virus themselves, but others were not so lucky.

Every month, the H.I.V.-positive children get a checkup. It is a government requirement. They have a blood count and according to their count they are prescribed medicine. Some do not have to take medicine yet, but they still have to go for the checkup. We have others that are full blown and are on full medication.

Here at the orphanage, I do not think the children lack anything that most children have, except one very important thing: family. We tell them that we are a big family, but we cannot give them the same individual attention that a mother and a father can give. We try to love them. We try to educate them. We care for them — but as you can see, there are many of them and few of us.

...I know the situation around us is not easy, but God is always helping us in other ways.

Surely, the world needs more heroes like Sister Lutgarda. CNEWA is proud to be supporting her in her mission. Visit this link to learn how you can support her, too.



1 December 2016
Greg Kandra




This image from 2013 shows Nuhad George Ghazala, who left Baghdad in 2010 with her husband and four children. She’s among many who have tried to make a new start in Jordan. Read about them in Out of Iraq from the Spring 2013 edition of ONE. (photo: Cory Eldridge)



1 December 2016
Greg Kandra




Syrians living in Aleppo flee the city on 1 December 2016. Some 100 Syrian refugees who have made their way to Lebanon are set to arrive in Rome on 2 December through a “humanitarian corridor” program. (photo: Ibrahim Ebu Leys/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Humanitarian corridor to Rome brings hope to Syrian refugees (Vatican Radio) One hundred Syrian refugees from Lebanon are set to arrive at Fiumincino Airport in Rome on 2 December through a special “humanitarian corridor” program, bringing the total intake to five-hundred refugees since the start of the project...

Iraqi Shi’ite militias could prove a bigger test than Mosul (Reuters) Baghdad is currently battling hardline Sunni group Islamic State in the northern city of Mosul. In that struggle, government troops are fighting alongside the country’s Shi’ite militias, as well as Kurdish and U.S. forces. But the government of Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi knows that even if it defeats Islamic State it needs to bring the Shi’ite militias under greater control...

European leaders gather to discuss Christian persecution (CNA) European leaders gathered this week at a conference in Vienna to discuss Christian persecution and its resounding effect on Europe, particularly emphasizing the need to seriously address religious discrimination and genocide around the world...

Jordanian Instagram account gives Syrian refugees a voice (Al Arabiya) Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the total number of refugees registered by UNHCR in Jordan stands at 655,833, as of November 2016. Although the extensive number of Syrian refugees has placed tremendous pressure on Jordan’s economy and infrastructure, many Jordanians are working to support these refugees. Determined to provide a voice for Syrian refugees in Jordan and raise awareness about their ongoing struggles, Jordanians Haneen Diri and Rana AlTarawneh created an Instagram account @Lifeofarefugenius to achieve this goal. Diri and AlTarawneh photograph Syrian women, men and children and post their experiences on Instagram, depicting the personal accounts and stories of a wide range of refugees...

Ethiopian-Israelis celebrate Sigd Day in Jerusalem (The Jerusalem Post) For more than 2,500 years, the Sigd was observed in Ethiopia as a day of fasting and prayer for the return to Zion, held on a mountaintop symbolizing Mount Sinai. Jews prayed to one day live in Jerusalem, a city they believed was paved with gold and filled with God’s light and powerful presence. On Wednesday, thousands of Ethiopian Israelis from across the country gathered on a picturesque promenade in the capital’s Armon Hanatziv neighborhood, where multiple generations of men, women and children celebrated their triumphant achievement...



30 November 2016
Greg Kandra




In this picture from September, Pope Francis is greeted by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople during an interfaith peace gathering at the Basilica of St. Francis in Assisi, Italy. (photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano handout via Reuters)

Today, 30 November, marks the feast of St. Andrew, the man traditionally held to be the founder of the See of Byzantium, which later became the Patriarchate of Constantinople.

At the conclusion of his general audience today, Pope Francis sent special greetings to “the beloved Patriarch Bartholomew” — the successor of Peter extending his warm wishes to the successor of Peter’s brother and doing so, as he put it, “in a spirit of genuine fraternity.”

Vatican Radio notes:

Pope Francis expressed his desire to be united to the patriarch and to the Church of Constantinople, offering them his “best wishes for all possible goods, for all the blessings of the Lord, and a warm embrace.”

A delegation from the Holy See, bearing a message from Pope Francis, is in Istanbul for a visit to the patriarchate on the Apostle’s feast day. The customary visit is reciprocated each year on the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul in Rome.

The Holy See delegation was led by Cardinal Kurt Koch, the president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity. Cardinal Koch was accompanied by the council’s secretary, Bishop Brian Farrell, and the under-secretary, Monsignor Andrea Palmieri. The delegation was joined in Constantinople by the apostolic nuncio in Turkey, Archbishop Paul Russell.

The delegation took part in the solemn Divine Liturgy offered by the ecumenical patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew, in the Patriarchal Church of St. George at the Phanar. They also met with the patriarch, as well as with the synodal commission on relations with the Catholic Church.

Following the Divine Liturgy, Cardinal Koch delivered an autograph message of Pope Francis to the ecumenical patriarch, accompanied by a gift.

In the message, Pope Francis said the annual exchange of delegations is “a visible sign of the profound bonds that already unite us” as well as “an expression of our yearning for ever deeper communion.” In the journey toward full communion, he said, “we are sustained by the intercession not only of our patron saints, but by the array of martyrs from every age.”

Pope Francis also noted “the strong commitment” to re-establishing Christian unity expressed by the Great and Holy Council held in Crete in June. The pope noted that relations between the churches have, at times, been marked by conflicts; “only prayer, common good works, and dialogue,” he said, “can enable us to overcome division and grow closer to one another.”

The Holy Father also wrote about the importance of theological dialogue, and especially the shared reflection on the relationship between synodality and primacy in the first millennium. This reflection, he said, “can offer a sure foundation for discerning ways in which primacy may be exercised in the church when all Christians of East and West are finally reconciled.”

Finally, Pope Francis fondly recalled his meeting with Patriarch Bartholomew and other Christian leaders and representatives of various world religions in Assisi. The Assisi gathering, he said, was a joyful opportunity to deepen our friendship, which finds expression in a shared vision regarding the great questions that affect the life of the church and of all society. He concluded his message with an assurance of prayer and best wishes for the ecumenical patriarch, and all those entrusted to his spiritual care.

You can read the full text of the pope’s message at this link.



Tags: Pope Francis Ecumenism Christian Unity Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I

30 November 2016
Greg Kandra




Residents flee the Al Moyaser neighborhood of Aleppo to a government-held area on 29 November 2016. (photo: Jawad al Rifai/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Report: Israeli airstrikes hit Syria outside Damascus (The Guardian) Israeli jets fired two missiles from Lebanese airspace towards the outskirts of the Syrian capital, Damascus, early on Wednesday, the official Syrian news agency said, in a strike on an unknown target that caused loud explosions…

U.N. to hold emergency meeting on Aleppo’s ‘descent into hell’ (CNN) The United Nations Security Council will hold an emergency meeting Wednesday on the dire humanitarian situation in the Syrian city of Aleppo. French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault called for the meeting on Tuesday…

Mosul food, water reserves dwindling (Reuters) The United Nations issued a fresh warning on Wednesday about the humanitarian situation in eastern Mosul where the U.S.-backed Iraqi army is locked in heavy fighting with ISIS militants. More than six weeks into the offensive against ISIS’ last major city stronghold in Iraq, the army is trying to dislodge militants dug in among civilians in the eastern districts, the only side Iraqi troops have been able to breach…

Lebanon stops building wall around parts of Palestinian refugee camp (The Jerusalem Post) The Lebanese Army informed the joint Palestinian leadership in Lebanon on Friday that it has halted construction of a cement wall around parts of the Ain al Hilweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon, the country’s largest, following popular protests…

Peace talks on Ukraine end without agreement (Reuters) Four-way talks on ending a separatist conflict in eastern Ukraine finished without a breakthrough on Tuesday, with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier declaring that “lip service” statements were not enough to achieve lasting peace…

Franciscans issue call for children to pray for peace in the Holy Land (OFM.org) “Dear Brothers and Sisters, May the Lord give you peace! For a long time, as Friars Minor, we have been concerned about the situation that our brothers are experiencing together with the Christians and the entire population of Syria. Not long ago, we called on the international community to intensify its efforts to stop the war and the suffering of the civilian population and to make every effort to achieve peace…”



Tags: Syria Iraq Ukraine Lebanon Holy Land

29 November 2016
Greg Kandra




The Little Sisters of Nazareth bring learning — and joy — to young residents of the Dbayeh Refugee Camp in Lebanon. (photo: Armineh Johannes)

This year, to mark #GivingTuesday, we are encouraging our friends around the world to support CNEWA’s education programs — and, as one example of that, we’re turning a spotlight on the Dbayeh Refugee Camp in Lebanon. There, a small group of heroic sisters is helping minister to thousands of displaced men, women and children. The Little Sisters of Nazareth are providing healing and help to so many who have seen their lives torn apart by war. We profiled the sisters several years ago in the pages of our magazine:

The Little Sisters of Nazareth have had a family of three nuns stationed in Lebanon since 1971. Sister Anita and Sister Rosa have served for four years, while Sister Joanna arrived a year ago, though she has long experience in Lebanon. Based first in Jisr el Basha, the sisters left Lebanon briefly for the safety of Jordan after the camp was razed in 1976. But in 1978, the Pontifical Mission [CNEWA’s operating agency in the Middle East] approached the sisters and, to ease their return, offered living quarters in Dbayeh.

With CNEWA’s support, the Little Sisters began their work at the camp in 1984.

“There were no other organizations working here,” Sister Joanna said. Since then they have been joined by several aid organizations, including World Vision and Caritas Lebanon. Through CNEWA, benefactors have sponsored many of the camp’s needy children and also fund educational programs, emergency health care and even infrastructure repair, such as sheathing the camp’s open sewers.

The sisters trace their roots to Blessed Charles de Foucauld, the French mystic and hermit who lived humbly in the Sahara desert and prayed to God, “I abandon myself into your hands, do with me what you will.” He desired to live among those who were “the most abandoned.” Today, this little band of heroic sisters continues to live out that spirit of sacrifice and surrender among the displaced in Lebanon — and CNEWA is proud to support them in their mission. Won’t you join us? Visit this page to learn how you can help.



29 November 2016
Greg Kandra




Syrian families, fleeing from various eastern districts of Aleppo, queue to get onto government buses before heading to government-controlled western Aleppo. The Syrian government offensive to recapture rebel-held Aleppo has prompted an exodus of civilians.
(photo: George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images)


‘Deeply alarming’: Thousands fleeing Aleppo (BBC) Up to 16,000 civilians have been displaced by the Syrian government’s advance into besieged rebel-held areas of the city of Aleppo, the UN says. Humanitarian chief Stephen O’Brien said thousands more were likely to flee if the fighting continued to spread and intensify in the coming days. He expressed concern about their fate, calling the situation deeply alarming...

Iraqi leader predicts ISIS collapse in Mosul (AP) Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi says Islamic State group fighters lack the courage to put up long-term resistance in Mosul, despite unleashing hundreds of car bombs that have killed and maimed Iraqi soldiers and civilians as the fight for Iraq’s second-largest city appears set to extend well into next year...

How ISIS recruiters found fertile ground in Kerala (The Guardian) India’s Muslim population, the third largest in the world, has so far contributed negligible numbers to ISIS — fewer than 90 people, according to most estimates. “More have gone from Britain, even from the Maldives, than India,” says Vikram Sood, a former chief of India’s foreign spy agency. But growing concern over the group’s influence was made official this month, when the US embassy in Delhi issued its first Isis-related warning, of an “increased threat to places in India frequented by Westerners, such as religious sites, markets and festival venues”...

15 arrested over burning Coptic guest house (Egypt Independent) The public prosecution ordered the remanding of 15 persons into custody over the burning of a Coptic community guest house in Naghameesh village, Sohag province, in the wake of rumors that the place had been turned into a church. All of the accused will be held for four days pending investigations, while another 13 persons were cleared and released...

‘My week living like a refugee’ (Catholic Register) From 14-17 November, I participated in an event called Life of a Mesopotamian Refugee. Students from the Assyrian Chaldean Syriac Student Union (ACSSU) wanted to reach two goals: to educate McMaster, Ryerson and York University students about refugees and to fundraise $30,000 to send to Iraq and Syria through the Catholic Near East Welfare Association (CNEWA). This year is the third time I tried to emulate the life of a refugee today, placing strong emphasis on the word “tried”...

VIDEO: Rebuilding a Greek Orthodox church in New York destroyed on 9/11 (The New York Times) Construction of the St. Nicholas National Shrine is underway...



28 November 2016
Anna Fata




One of the young people at Lebanon’s Dbayeh Refugee Camp is Abed, who hopes to learn French so he can be accepted into the Lebanese school system. (photo: Anna Fata)

Editor’s note: This year for #GivingTuesday, CNEWA is encouraging our friends to support our education programs, including those at the Dbayeh Refugee Camp outside Beirut. You can learn more about how to help on our special Giving Tuesday page. Below, Anna Fata, a friend and advocate of CNEWA who works with the Holy See Mission to the U.N. in New York City, describes visiting the camp earlier this year.

On a recent trip to Lebanon to visit my family, I got to encounter some of the people CNEWA helps: a small number of the estimated 1.5 million refugees living in Lebanon. I visited the Dbayeh Refugee Camp on the outskirts of Beirut; it is home to more than 4,000 refugees, most of whom are Palestinian Christians. It is also home to the Little Sisters of Nazareth, one of many local congregations with whom CNEWA partners to offer relief and assistance to those displaced within the Middle East.

I had seen enough pictures of refugee camps to expect the run-down buildings and rusted playground. But what I didn’t expect — and what truly surprised me — was the resilience and generosity I discovered among its residents.

I visited in the summer, while many refugee children were attending one of the summer camp programs supported by CNEWA. The leader of the summer camp is a Palestinian refugee named Elias. He was born in Lebanon and has lived at the camp his whole life. The other summer camp workers were also refugees, many of whom recalled attending the camp in their childhood. For various reasons, Lebanese law prohibits refugees from working in professions such as law, medicine and engineering. As a result, unemployment is one of the major issues refugees face there. Elias, like many of the other camp workers, makes a living by serving the children in his community.

The ongoing conflict in neighboring states has brought an influx of Syrian and Iraqi refugees into Lebanon, as well. Elias told me the Palestinian Christians who make up most of Dbayeh’s residents accepted the Syrian refugees — many of them Muslim — into their community with open arms, sharing resources and jobs. In a country where until recently most neighborhoods and towns were segregated by religion, the Dbayeh camp is an exceptional model of harmonious interreligious living. Despite cultural and religious differences, Syrian and Palestinian children learn and play well together at school, as their parents educate them and socialize together, as well.

I don’t want to paint a rose-colored picture of their lives. Refugees are stigmatized both legally and socially. For example, I spoke with a 17-year-old camp counselor named Tania who spoke flawless English, loved math and aspired to work in finance. I was heartbroken to discover that her status as a refugee prevents her from working in her desired field. There are also laws that make it difficult to make basic home repairs to the “temporary houses” these families have lived in for more than 70 years. (An elderly couple I spoke with, for example, said the tin roof on their home always made noise, especially when rain fell on the leaky roof.)

Despite their troubles, everyone I met treated me with characteristic Middle Eastern hospitality and warmth. The children offered me their snacks, and poor families who had little to give invited me in for tea.

The more I learn about the situation of refugees in the Middle East, the more complex the issues facing these groups appear. I’m no expert on the Middle East and cannot begin to fathom solutions that would give the refugees a place of permanence. But I think there is an appropriate human response that we — whether Christians, Muslims, Jews, or none of the above — need to choose. It is a response that the Little Sisters of Nazareth are living every day. We can be part of the solution by following the example of the sisters and the refugees themselves — to respond with the same openness and generosity they have shown one another, despite differences in beliefs and culture.

As we celebrate this holiday season with our own families, we need to remember those who will be far from home for the holidays — including those who are internally-displaced and cared for by local congregations in the Middle East. Some may even celebrate their first Christmas in a refugee camp, separated from loved ones they may never see again.

The political and economic instability in Lebanon and surrounding areas makes the work of organizations such as CNEWA all the more vital. The refugees I met make up just a tiny fraction of the men, women and children CNEWA serves. There are so many more — and the needs are so great. This holiday season, please remember these and others CNEWA is working to uplift and support.

Visit this link to learn how you can help. To read more about refugees in Lebanon, check out Lebanon on the Brink from the Spring 2015 edition of ONE. To learn more about the selfless work of the Little Sisters of Nazareth, read A Sister Act Hard to Follow. And take a moment to watch the video below for a poignant glimpse into the lives of refugees in Dbayeh.





28 November 2016
Oscar Durand, Catholic News Service




The Rev. Remzi Diril, also known as Father Adday, celebrates the liturgy at an apartment in Kirsehir, Turkey, on 10 November. (photo: CNS/Oscar Durand)

Holding a golden chalice and paten with a single hand, Father Remzi Diril slowly moved from one person to another, distributing the Eucharist. He reached for a consecrated host, dipped it in the chalice, and gave it to a woman in her 40s, whose head was covered with a veil.

With chants in the background and incense filling the air, the moment inspired reverence. Yet the liturgy was not in a church; it was in an apartment in Kirsehir, a small, conservative city in the heart of Turkey, a Muslim-majority country.

Being the only Chaldean Catholic priest in charge of pastoral work in Turkey, Father Adday, as he is known, has become a true itinerant priest, a road warrior who, each year, logs thousands of miles tending his flock, the community of Iraqi Christian refugees in Turkey. Their exact number is unknown, but it is estimated to be 40,000.

Since he was ordained two years ago, Father Adday, 34, has baptized more than 200 children, married more than 20 couples and administered the Anointing of the Sick to more than 30 people. He also is on his fifth suitcase.

“So far this year we have celebrated first Communion for more than 100 children. And last year it was more than 150,” he said.

On a recent hourlong flight from his base in Istanbul to Nevsehir, a city in central Turkey, Father Adday sat comfortably in the emergency exit row of a plane from a low-cost airline.

“There is more legroom here,” Father Adday said; his eyes locked on the airline’s magazine crossword.

The trip’s cost is an important factor considering that the church is not able to reimburse his expenses. That only happens when there is an official function or religious festival. More often it is the priest, or the families he visits, who pay for the trip.

“It is easier for them to help me with my travel expenses than to pay, for a family of 10, for a trip to Istanbul," Father Adday explained.

Once he arrives at his destination, the priest relies on a support network who connects him to the local community of Iraqi Christians.

From Nevsehir Father Adday took a 60-mile bus ride to Kirsehir, where he met Adnan Barbar and his wife, Faten Somo. This was the priest's eight time in the city.

“This is my family in Kirsehir. In every city, I have a family. Sometimes more than one,” he said.

The couple acts as Father Adday’s local liaison. After welcoming the priest to their apartment with the customary tea and sweets, Barbar and Somo got on their cellphones. They were familiar with the city’s 225 Iraqi Christian families, and they were assembling the priest’s itinerary.

This area of Turkey is a pivotal place in the history of Christianity. Early Christians came here escaping persecution in the Roman Empire. Remains of the churches they built can still be visited today. However, no Catholic churches function in this part of the country. And when Father Adday visits, Mass is celebrated in homes, as the early Christians also did.

Celebrating the liturgy in a public hall would allow more people to attend, but renting a hall costs about $900, which can be better spent traveling to visit more families.

On average, 10 families are invited to each Mass, and 30 people attend. This allows for an experience different from the one felt in a church.

“A Mass in a house is more like a family. Father and children sharing the glory of God,” Father Adday said. “I would say it is like watching a film in a movie theater versus watching it at home with your family.”

After the liturgy, the priest visited Marta Kiryakos, a woman from Bartella, Iraq, suffering from cancer. Her daughter, Nadira, opened the door of the bedroom, crying, worried about her mother's health. Kiryakos' condition is delicate, and the priest prayed for several minutes as he anointed her temples and forehead with oils.

Many of the people Father Adday visits have spent several years in Turkey, waiting for an answer to their asylum applications to countries such as Australia, Canada and the United States. The process is long, and this time in limbo has caused many people physical and psychological problems.

“People need spiritual help. They need a priest. They want the church with them. I can’t give them material things, but I can give them my time and give them hope,” the priest said.

Father Adday and the Iraqi refugees he serves are Assyrian, an ethnic group from the Middle East. Their language — Assyrian — is related to the language Jesus spoke, Aramaic.

But their connection is not only the ethnic group and language. When Father Adday was a child, his village in southeast Turkey was burned during the Kurdish-Turkish conflict. He and his family had to move to Istanbul.

That is another reason that keeps Father Adday on the road with the people.

“When you leave your sheep in the mountain, you don’t know what will happen to them. But when you are with them it is different. You can show them where the water is; where there is a good place to stay. They are like children waiting for their father,” he said.

After two intense days and one night in Kirsehir, Father Adday prepared to return to Istanbul. He celebrated five liturgies and visited multiple families, but he said he was not tired.

“I hope that my visits allow them to become more spiritual and in touch with the church, and to refresh their belief in Jesus. Every Christian needs to refresh his spiritual life,” he said.

“I also hope to give them hope and remind them ... that God makes miracles, and for that they need to believe. I tell them let God do the working for you. He is our Father and he wants the best for you,” Father Adday said.







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