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Spring, 2017
Volume 43, Number 1
  
29 July 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Patriarch Filaret, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Kiev Patriarchate, meets with Metropolitan Volodymyr, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Moscow Patriarchate. To learn more about the status and history of this church, read see the Profile that appeared in the May 2012 issue of ONE. (photo: Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Kiev Patriarchate)

Patriarch: Unification of Ukrainian Orthodox churches not far off (Interfax) Patriarch Filaret noted that there are two distinctive features in the celebration of the 1,025th anniversary of the Christianization of the Kiev Rus — in particular, the fact that the state and the church celebrate the holiday together, and that all Ukrainian churches celebrate it together. He again expressed confidence that the unification of Ukrainian Orthodox churches into in a single local church is not far off…

Attack on Minya churches repelled by residents, security forces (Daily News Egypt) Residents protected Al Azraa and Anba Ebram churches from attacks by alleged Morsi supporters in Minya on Saturday, spokesperson of the archbishop of Mawas monastery Amgad Ezzat has told state-owned MENA agency. “They threw Molotov cocktails at Al Azraa and Anba Ebram churches but were not able to break in as nearby Muslims and Christians were securing the churches,” said Ishak Ibrahim, researcher at Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR). He added that the protesters tried to storm in Al Eslah church but were prevented. “However, both Al Eslah church and an annex of the Catholic church were raided before, on 3 July,” he said…

In Egypt, love for Sisi overshadows protester deaths (Christian Science Monitor) The day after at least 74 Islamist protesters were killed in clashes with Egyptian security forces, none of Egypt’s main newspapers on Sunday showed the injured, the dead, or even the vast crowds staging a sit-in against the coup that deposed former President Mohamed Morsi. One newspaper went so far as to blanket the front page with regal photos of Egypt’s military chief, General Abdel Fattah al Sisi, and revered nationalist leader Gamal Abdel Nasser with a headline roughly equivalent to, “Spot on, chief!” The elevation of General Sisi to almost legendary status when well over 200 people, mostly Islamists, have been killed in clashes since he led a July 3 coup has raised cries of anguish from a small but vocal segment of Egyptians. They openly wonder how their fellow citizens — including so many who fought for democratic government in the 2011 protests that toppled Hosni Mubarak — have become so deliriously in love with the army, and worry they are blind to the potential for a return to dictatorship…

Rai urges leaders to attend National Dialogue session (Daily Star Lebanon) Maronite Patriarch Bechara Rai urged rival leaders Sunday to attend National Dialogue sessions to achieve reconciliation, warning that a delay in all-party talks would deepen differences among the Lebanese and increase damage to the country. The patriarch also renewed his call for a new social contract based on the 1943 National Pact aimed at strengthening sectarian coexistence and the equal power-sharing formula between Christians and Muslims…

Millions of Muslims drawn to Marian devotion (AsiaNews) Each year millions of Muslims come on pilgrimage to the Catholic Marian shrines. Not only to the major shrines such as Fatima in Portugal or Harissa in Lebanon, but also to Egypt, Syria and Iran. Muslims — especially Muslim women — go to give thanks to the Madonna or great Christian saints, like St. Charbel or St. George…



Tags: Egypt Violence against Christians Christian-Muslim relations Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter Ukrainian Orthodox Church

26 July 2013
Greg Kandra




During a World Youth Day Mass this week, Pope Francis gestures and shows his chotki,
or prayer rope. (photo: AP via News.va.)


Some Roman Catholics may have wondered what Pope Francis was wearing around his wrist during his visit to Rio de Janeiro this week. But the faithful in the Eastern churches — Catholic and Orthodox — no doubt recognized it: it’s a chotki, or prayer rope. It’s not uncommon to see patriarchs wearing one. It’s almost unheard of, though, to see one in the hands of the bishop of Rome.

Some background:

The rope is usually used with the Jesus Prayer: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.” Historically it typically had 100 knots, although prayer ropes with 300, 50, or 33 knots or, less commonly, 250 or 12 can also be found in use today. There is typically a knotted cross at one end, and a few beads at certain intervals between the knots. “The purpose is to help us concentrate, not necessarily to count.”

Its invention is attributed to St. Pachomius in the fourth century as an aid for illiterate monks to accomplish a consistent number of prayers and prostrations. Monks were often expected to carry a prayer rope with them, to remind them to pray constantly in accordance with St. Paul’s injunction in I Thessalonians 5:17, “Pray without ceasing.”

Pope Francis, of course, has a close connection to the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. Shortly after the pope’s election, Patriarch Sviatoslav wrote:

The newly elected Pope Francis was mentored by one of our priests, Stepan Chmil who is now buried in the basilica of St. Sophia in Rome. Today’s Pope, during his time as a student of the Salesian school, awoke many hours before his classmates to concelebrate at our Divine Liturgy with Fr. Stepan. He knows our Tradition very well, as well as our Liturgy.

The last time I had an opportunity to see him was as I was preparing to leave Argentina for Ukraine. I asked him to bear witness to the process of beatifying Fr. Stepan Chmil, to which, he gladly agreed. The Holy Father very well knows not only of our Church, but also our liturgy, our rites, and our spirituality.

Apart from this, Pope Francis, as archbishop of Buenos Aires, was assigned as ordinary for Eastern Catholics, specifically those who at the time did not have members of their own hierarchy. Our Eparchy in Argentina is, let’s say, suffragan to the Archbishop’s seat of Buenos Aires. In this way, Cardinal Bergoglio, always took care of our Church in Argentina; and as a young bishop, I took my first steps in episcopal ministry under his watchful eyes and help. Because of this, I am positive that the Holy Father will be a great help to our Church, and I expect that great things await our Church with this Pope.



26 July 2013
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2012, then-President Mohammed Morsi of Egypt is flanked by high-ranking military personnel as he address soldiers at a checkpoint in El-Arish.
(photo: CNS /Egyptian Presidency handout via Reuters)


Prosecutors charge Egypt’s Morsi with espionage (Los Angeles Times) Egyptian prosecutors have charged deposed President Mohamed Morsi with espionage and colluding with the militant group Hamas in provocative accusations ahead of rival rallies planned Friday by Islamists and largely secular opposition forces. The charges against Morsi, who has been in army custody since his overthrow on 3 July, are certain to infuriate tens of thousands of his Islamist supporters who have been demonstrating in Cairo and other cities. The accusations come the day after the army warned Islamists to disband their sit-ins or face retaliation...

Orthodox leaders demand end to torture, murder of Christians (ByzCath.org) The heads and representatives of all 15 autocephalous Eastern Orthodox churches have issued a joint statement lamenting the persecution of Christians around the world. The leaders have gathered to commemorate the 1025th anniversary of the baptism of Kievan Rus’, the medieval Slavic state that helped give birth to modern Russia and Ukraine. “Every day thousands of believers in Christ are being tortured and driven out of their native lands; many people meet their death,” they said in a statement published by Interfax, a Russian news agency. “News about tortures and murders are coming from Nigeria, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and India...”

Patriarchs meet, urge unity (Sofia News Agency) New Bulgarian Patriarch Neofit has met with Russian Patriarch Kiril in Moscow, the Holy Synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church informs. The Patriarch is leading the Bulgarian delegation which is taking part in the celebrations of the 1025th anniversary of the converting of Russia to Christianity, the so-called “Baptism of Russia.” The delegation will be in Moscow until July 30. The invitation was extended by the Moscow Patriarchy. The two Patriarchs first visited the chapel in the Synod's headquarters in Moscow and then held a talk...

Denver area home to 30,000 from Ethiopia, Eritrea (Denver Post) A bloody, 17-year civil war that began in 1974 drove a mass migration to the United States. Church groups helped at least 2,700 refugees from Ethiopia and Eritrea, the province that split off after the war ended in 1991, resettle in Denver. Others followed to join families, for education, for job opportunities. Today, activists and academics estimate there are more than 30,000 Ethiopians and Eritreans among the seven-county metro area’s nearly 2.9 million people. As a group, Ethiopians have stitched together a vibrant piece of the city’s social and commercial fabric. They own businesses, build ornate churches, send their kids to state colleges and live an American dream...

Pope is most influential, second most-followed world leader on Twitter (CNS) Pope Francis is the most influential world leader on Twitter, with the highest number of retweets worldwide. He also is the second most-followed leader of the world, running behind — albeit by a long stretch — U.S. President Barack Obama. The rankings were released 24 July in a recent study titled “Twiplomacy,” which refers to the use of Twitter by world leaders...



25 July 2013
Greg Kandra




Young men attend a shoemaking class at vocational training center in Minya, Egypt.
(photo: Sean Sprague)


Several years ago, we visited a vocational school in Upper Egypt that was giving hope and opportunity to the handicapped:

The Jesuit Center for the Handicapped is one of several projects in the region funded by CNEWA. The center is dedicated to youths who would otherwise have few opportunities for an independent life.

The center, originally for boys, was founded in 1983. Since 1992, girls have also been admitted. There are now 40 students at the center and admission is equally divided by gender.

Students are bused from surrounding areas and they room at the center from Monday to Thursday. By having a three-day weekend in their villages, respect is paid to both Muslims, who pray on Fridays, and Christians, who worship on Sundays.

Minya’s population is about 20 percent Christian and 80 percent Muslim. Osama Iseq, the center’s director, said there are tensions between the two religious communities, fueled largely by Islamic fundamentalists.

“At first we had problems with bringing the students to the center,” he said. “There was one village we could not even get to because of anti-Christian feelings, but now there is no problem. Here Muslims and Christians get along. That students are eating, studying, living and working together is better than any discussion...

...The center’s two-year course provides vocational training in the morning and literacy and simple mathematics classes in the afternoon. When students are finished with the course, they read, write, do basic arithmetic and are prepared for an independent life with practical job skills.

But while the vocational school is relatively new, the Jesuits have a long history of being educators in Minya. On the same campus as the Center for the Handicapped is a primary and preparatory school founded in 1889. The Jesuit Fathers school also receives scholarship grants from CNEWA.

The 800-pupil school is run by five Jesuit priests and one brother, two of whom are Egyptians, two are Maltese, one is French and the other is Dutch. Also on staff are a number of Christian and Muslim teachers.

Jesuit Father Joseph Mizi, the school’s director, said the school is one of the best in the district even though it primarily serves the poorer children of the area.

Read more about efforts to take young people From Dusty to Dignity in the November 2002 issue of the magazine.



25 July 2013
Greg Kandra




Missio President Msgr. Klaus Krämer visits with CNEWA President Msgr. John Kozar.
(photo: CNEWA)


Msgr. Klaus Krämer, president of Missio, the German Catholic mission organization of the Pontifical Mission Societies, visited the New York offices of CNEWA this morning. A longtime collaborator with Msgr. Kozar, Msgr. Krämer was in the United States to meet with other Catholic agencies and help build what he called “Catholic solidarity.” He expressed his appreciation for his work with Msgr. Kozar — “We have a very good partnership,” he said — and spoke of a desire to consolidate efforts and build a worldwide network of charities devoted to serving the poor in Africa, Asia and Oceania.

Describing the work of Missio, Msgr. Krämer put it simply: “We invest in people.” Missio supports numerous programs and projects. One annual program, “Three Kings,” involves children caroling throughout Germany during the first week of January to raise money for poor children in the regions Missio serves. This immensely popular project raised €42 million last year. You can learn more about Missio — one of the oldest mission societies in the world, founded in 1822 — by visiting its UK website.

Msgr. Krämer himself has a colorful background. He was a lawyer before becoming a priest and served for several years as secretary to Cardinal Walter Kasper, president emeritus of the Pontifical Council for Christian Unity. (Among other things, Msgr. Krämer is editing the writings of Cardinal Kasper and, while in New York, plans to meet with several publishers.)

When I asked him to sum up his organization’s message, Msgr. Krämer paused and thought for a moment.

“The Gospel is alive,” he said. “The church is not only a question of life in a parish, life in a country, it’s part of an international network. This is like a global village. The Catholic Church is one of the oldest and biggest global players. And this network of churches is something very unique. And it’s a challenge for us, as Catholics, to be in contact and to help. But it’s also a source that can encourage us in our own faith.

“We can see how alive the church is in other parts of the world and how they are dealing with their challenges, their problems. So we are not only giving. We are also receiving a lot from them. This is important for the life of the church. And it’s important for the whole world.”



25 July 2013
Greg Kandra




A Free Syrian Army fighter carries his weapon as he runs to take cover in Aleppo’s Salaheddine neighborhood on 23 July. Archbishop Francis A. Chullikatt, papal nuncio to the United Nations, criticized the “persistent refusal” of Syria’s warring factions to negotiate an end to the country’s 28-month-long civil war. (photo: CNS/Muzaffar Salman, Reuters)

Holy See: There can be no military solution to Syria (Fides) No more wasting time, exclude any military option, immediately start a negotiation: that is what Archbishop. Francis A. Chullikatt, papal nuncio to the United Nations, asked yesterday during the open debate of the Security Council on the Middle East. The nuncio criticized the “persistent refusal” of Syria’s warring factions to negotiate an end to the country’s 28-month-long civil war, calling on the international community to act quickly to stop the conflict. “There can be no military solution to the Syrian conflict,” he said in his speech...

UN puts death toll in Syria at 100,000 (AP) Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Thursday raised the death toll in Syria’s civil war to more than 100,000, up from nearly 93,000 just over a month ago. Ban called on the Syrian government and opposition to halt the violence in the 2 ½ year civil war, saying it is “imperative to have a peace conference in Geneva as soon as possible...”

UK bishops call for peace in Holy Land (Vatican Radio) Catholic and Anglican bishops in England and Wales have met with the Israeli ambassador to Britain, calling for increased efforts to bring lasting peace to the Holy Land. In their meeting with Ambassador Daniel Taub on Wednesday, Bishop Declan Lang, chair of the Catholic Bishops’ department for International Affairs, and Bishop Michael Langrish, who heads the Church of England’s efforts for Midde East peace, said conflict between Israelis and Palestinians “has for far too long been an open wound,” frustrating the aspirations of both communities to live in dignity, peace and security...”

Metropolitan Hilarion: the West is moving to a kind of dictatorship (Interfax) Modern Western states move to absolute dictatorship, head of the Department for External Church Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate Metropolitan Hilarion believes. “Nowadays state sets a principle of secularity, independency from any outside authority that is authorized to point out to violations of morals or rights,” the metropolitan writes in his article published in the Pravoslavnaya Beseda magazine. People are declared the only source of authority in a democratic state, and people should realize this authority through free will of citizens participating in elections and referendums...



24 July 2013
Greg Kandra




A mother and child pause for a picture at the Godano Institution, a home for abused girls and women. The women attend classes, learning to sew and work as beauticians. Last year, CNEWA President Msgr. John Kozar visited and wrote about his experience. Read his moving account of “the Church”s Priority.” (photo: Cody Christopulos)



Tags: Ethiopia Education Women (rights/issues)

24 July 2013
Greg Kandra




This image from last year shows destruction in Homs after clashes between the Syrian army and rebels. (photo: CNS/SANA handout via Reuters)

Red Cross: Syria blocking aid to Homs (Al Jazeera) Syrian authorities are blocking access to the Old City of Homs, where trapped civilians are in dire need of food and medical supplies, the Red Cross said. The International Committee of the Red Cross (I.C.R.C.), in a statement issued on Wednesday, warned of possible “tragic” consequences if aid does not arrive in Homs soon. The agency revealed last Friday that it was negotiating a humanitarian pause to be able to enter Homs, where President Bashar al Assad’s forces have been conducting a heavy offensive against rebels, with air and artillery strikes…

Lombardi: Pope Francis brings attention to the poor (Vatican Radio) The director of the Holy See Press Office and director general of Vatican Radio, Father Federico Lombardi, S.J., has been to World Youth Days under three popes — John Paul II, Benedict XVI and Francis. He said each pope has his own individual style and way of speaking to young people. “We recall the popes of the World Youth Day, obviously. Every one of them has his style, his way of speech, his different relation to the young people,” Father Lombardi said. “At the time of John Paul II, there was the problem of East and West maybe for some of the World Youth Days, then [with Pope Benedict XVI] there was the problem of the digital generation in Madrid and so on. We see now that Pope Francis brings the attention to the urgent needs of the world of today — the poor, hunger, justice, human spiritual development,” he explained…

Celebrations mark 1025th anniversary of Christianity in Russia (Voice of Russia) Today, on 24 July celebrations are starting in Russia that are dedicated to the 1025th anniversary of Christianity in Russia. The head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill will lead the service in the country’s main cathedral — the Cathedral of Christ the Savior. The 1025th birthday of Russian Christianity will be marked by church services and cross processions not only in Russia, but also in Belorussia and Ukraine…



Tags: Pope Francis Syrian Civil War Pope Benedict XVI Pope John Paul II World Youth Day

23 July 2013
Greg Kandra




A girl attends the Divine Liturgy at the Melkite Greek Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of Paradise in São Paulo, Brazil. This week, hundreds of thousands of young people are expected to take part in the visit of Pope Francis to Brazil for World Youth Day. Check out our archives to read more about the Greek Catholic Paradise in Brazil. (photo: Izan Petterle)



Tags: Pope Francis Melkite Greek Catholic Church Melkite World Youth Day Brazil

23 July 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Pope Francis waves from his popemobile after arriving in Rio de Janeiro on 22 July. (photo: CNS/Ueslei Marcelino, Reuters)

Brazil crowds delight Pope Francis, frustrate his guards (Christian Science Monitor) A wrong turn sent a humble Fiat carrying Pope Francis into the thick of a frenzied Rio crowd Monday, in his first minutes back in South America since becoming pontiff. It was a nightmare for security officials, but for the clearly delighted pope just another opportunity to connect. The pope is visiting Brazil on a seven-day visit meant to fan the fervor of the young faithful around the globe. That task has grown more challenging as Roman Catholics stray, even in strongholds of the religion such as Brazil, yet it seemed to come easily to Francis even on the drive from the airport to an official opening ceremony… [The full text of Pope Francis’ arrival speech is available via Vatican Radio.]

In Pictures: Syria’s young refugees (Al Jazeera) Among the Syrian refugees located in camps in Jordan and Lebanon, children face particular hardship. A significant percentage of child fatalities occur while en route to escape the war in Syria. While on this perilous journey, juveniles are often separated from their parents and left to die in the rugged terrain. For such children, life consists of hiding from snipers and shelling, facing extreme weather without shelter, and pursuing desperate measures for nutrition, such as licking moisture from grass…

In Lebanon, more Syrian students than Lebanese expected (Fides) About half of the 6.8 million Syrians in need of urgent humanitarian assistance, both within Syria and across its borders, are school-age children. In September, for the start of the new school year, it is expected that there will be more Syrian refugee students than Lebanese in the public schools. According to the United Nations, the schools are not prepared to accept many refugee children. Compounding the situation is the recruitment of child soldiers…

Monks in Egypt’s lawless Sinai preserve an ancient library (Yahoo! News) Just as they have done for 17 centuries, the Greek Orthodox monks of St. Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt’s Sinai desert and the local Jabaliya Bedouins worked together to protect the monastery when the 2011 revolution thrust Egypt into a period of uncertainty. Afraid they could be attacked by extremists or bandits in the relatively lawless expanse of desert, the 25 monks put the monastery’s most valuable manuscripts in the building’s storage room. Their Bedouin friends, who live at the base of Saint Catherine’s in a town of the same name, allegedly took up their weapons and guarded the perimeter. The community’s fears of an attack were not realized, but the monks decided they needed a new way to protect their treasured library from any future threats. Last year, they began a program of digitally copying biblical scripts with the help of multispectral imaging specialists from around the world, while simultaneously renovating and modernizing the library itself…

Pope Francis mourns Indian cardinal (Catholic Herald) Indian Cardinal Simon Pimenta, who led the Archdiocese of Bombay for more than 18 years, died on Friday at the age of 93. Sending his condolences to Catholics in Mumbai (as Bombay is now named), Pope Francis remembered the cardinal’s “long years of devoted service to the Catholic community there and his many years of faithful assistance to the successor of Peter as a member of the College of Cardinals.” His death leaves the College of Cardinals with 203 members, 112 of whom are under the age of 80 and therefore eligible to vote in a conclave…



Tags: Pope Francis Refugees Monastery Refugee Camps World Youth Day





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