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Current Issue
September, 2019
Volume 45, Number 3
  
11 February 2019
Greg Kandra




Cardinal Peter Turkson is in India to mark the 27th World Day of the Sick.
(video: Vatican Media/YouTube)


Cardinal visits India to promote World Day of the Sick (Vatican News) Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Prefect of the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development, is in Calcutta to celebrate the 27th World Day of the Sick, held annually on 11 February, the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes. Speaking to Vatican News, the Cardinal says the Pope’s message to the faithful is that there can be no true care without sharing in the situation of those afflicted, by showing compassion and being willing to empathize with the sick…

U.S. general: ’Tens of thousands’ of ISIS fighters remain in Iraq and Syria (CNN) The top US commander in the war against ISIS aligned himself Sunday with the US intelligence community assessment that there are “tens of thousands” of ISIS fighters spread across Syria and Iraq. “They are dispersed and disaggregated, but there is leadership, there are fighters there, there are facilitators there,” Gen. Joseph Votel told reporters traveling with him to the Middle East for his farewell tour…

Former Muslim highlights plight of Christian converts in Iran (Catholic Register) An increase in Muslims converting to Christianity has prompted a crackdown by Iran’s theocratic government, says an Iranian convert to Christianity…

‘Prison of Christ’ reopens in Jerusalem (AFP/Premier.org) Visitors are being allowed back to a place in Jerusalem where some people believe Jesus was held captive prior to his crucifixion. The ‘Prison of Christ’ chapel had been closed to tourists for a number of years while repairs were carried out following a fire which caused significant damage…

African leaders unveil statue of Ethiopia’s last emperor (AP) A statue of Ethiopia’s Emperor Haileselassie has been unveiled at the headquarters of the African Union on Sunday. The statue is the second to be erected inside the continental body’s offices in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa, after one of Ghana’s first leader, Kwame Nkrumah, who championed pan-Africanism…



Tags: Syria India Ethiopia Jerusalem ISIS

8 February 2019
Greg Kandra




A gift is pictured as Pope Francis leads an audience with members of the Missionaries of Africa and the Missionaries of Our Lady of Africa at the Vatican on 8 February 2019. The statue depicts a farmer carrying the Gospel to others as he works. (photo: CNS/Vatican Media)

Pope Francis met with missionaries from Africa on Friday, and offered a vision for how to bear witness to the Gospel.

From CNS’s Cindy Wooden:

Proclaiming the Gospel is not the same thing as proselytism and often means simply being a neighbor and friend to someone while living an authentically Christian life, Pope Francis said.

Mission “is that dynamic that leads you to be a neighbor to others to share the gift you have received: the encounter of love that changed your life and led you to consecrate your life to the Lord Jesus, good news for the life and salvation of the world,” the pope said on 8 February.

Pope Francis spoke about mission and witness during a meeting with the Missionaries of Africa and the Missionaries of Our Lady of Africa, men’s and women’s religious orders founded 150 years ago by Cardinal Charles Lavigerie of Algiers, Algeria.

Encouraging the missionaries to continue being “nomads for the Gospel,” the pope asked them to be “men and women who are not afraid to go into the deserts of this world and seek together the means for accompanying brothers and sisters to the oasis that is the Lord so that the living water of his love can quench their every thirst.”

To be a missionary, the pope said, a Christian first must be a disciple of Jesus.

And while the missionaries may be working in situations where an explicit invitation to follow Christ is not possible, he said, their own lives must be firmly rooted in “listening to his word, the celebration of the sacraments and service to your brothers and sisters so that your gestures manifest his presence, his merciful love and his compassion to those to whom the Spirit sends and leads you.”

Pope Francis prayed that the Holy Spirit would continue to make the Missionaries of Africa and the Missionaries of Our Lady of Africa “builders of bridges” and promoters of a “culture of encounter” and dialogue where everyone involved “learns to draw riches from the diversity of the other.”

The missionaries’ dialogue with Muslims deserves particular recognition and the gratitude of the church, the pope said.

Our own Msgr. John E. Kozar expressed his thoughts about “accompanying our brothers and sisters” in the current edition of ONE. Check it out.



Tags: Pope Francis Africa

8 February 2019
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis has made the issue of human trafficking the subject of his prayer intentions for February, as he explains in the video above. Friday, he declared that it is the duty of Christians to raise awareness about this crisis. (video: Rome Reports/YouTube)

Pope: Duty of Christians to raise awareness of human trafficking (Vatican News) Pope Francis on Friday received in audience members of the Galileo Foundation, telling them on the feast day of Saint Josephine Bakhita, the patron of victims of human trafficking, that Christians can follow her great example…

As ISIS shrinks, Syrians return home to discover a wasteland (CNN) As the war against ISIS wanes, civilians returning to their homes in Iraq and Syria are discovering wastelands where towns once stood — urban moonscapes of twisted metal, shattered concrete, unexploded bombs and mines…

Bishop: Abu Dhabi document is a roadmap for interreligious dialogue (Vatican News) Bishop Miguel Ángel Ayuso, Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, told Vatican News that the Abu Dhabi document signed by the Pope and the Grand Imam of Al-Ahzar, is a precious roadmap for peace, and contains indications that must be spread throughout the world…

Discovering the ‘second Jerusalem’ for Ethiopia’s Christians (Andalou Agency) The churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia are pieces of architecture that fascinate visitors with their underground constructions. The region is called the “Jerusalem of Ethiopia” as Ethiopian King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela wanted to build a second Jerusalem in the area as the roads leading to Jerusalem were not safe. Each of the structures, constructed underground so enemies could not recognize them, help to understand the strong religious life of Ethiopia during that time through the symbols they reflect…



Tags: Syria Pope Francis Ethiopia Muslim Interreligious

7 February 2019
Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D.




Pope Francis meets Sheikh Ahmad al Tayyeb during his visit to the U.A.E. earlier this week.
(photo: Vatican Media)


On Sunday 3 February Pope Francis made history, when he began a three-day visit to Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.) and became the first pope to visit the overwhelmingly Muslim Arabian Peninsula. The visit coincided with an interfaith meeting of religious leaders and theologians which was taking place.

The pope was greeted by Crown Prince Muhammad bin Zayed al Nahyan. The U.A.E. are home to a large number of Christians from south Asia who are working there. For several years the government has had a Ministry of Tolerance; Christians for the most part are able to worship freely, although not publicly. The U.A.E. is one of the more tolerant and open countries in the region.

While words like “unprecedented” are often used in the context of what Pope Francis does — and while such words tend to get overused and with inflation comes devaluation — one result of the visit, nevertheless, stands out in a special way. Pope Francis and Sheikh Ahmad al Tayyeb, the head of Al Azhar University, arguably the premier Sunni Muslim university in the world, produced a common document entitled Human Fraternity. It is a landmark document in many ways. While popes and Muslim leaders have made similar calls for peace and justice, this is unique in that it is a joint call, signed by the two men.

People familiar with reading statements of religious leaders recognize a certain “style” of writing peculiar to different traditions. Human Fraternity, however, is unique in that it evidences not only a “Catholic” style of writing but also a “Muslim” style of writing. It was and is intended to be both a Muslim and Catholic statement.

And this is especially significant: there is something new happening in the ecumenical and interreligious movements that can be seen at work in Human Fraternity. The Ecumenical and interreligious movements have been part of the central mission of the Catholic Church since Vatican II (1962-1965). In the decades following the council, there was tremendous progress made in the official dialogues between the Catholic Church and other churches and religions. Several “convergence” documents have been agreed upon, and in 1999 the Lutheran World Federation and the Catholic Church published A Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification. The Doctrine of Justification was the primary theological point of difference between the Catholic Church and the Lutheran Reformers in the 16th century.

Yet for all the tremendous progress made on the theological level, by the 1990’s one began to hear of an “ecumenical winter” — or at the very least, ecumenical doldrums. It seemed to many that the incredible progress made through dialogue had not been translated into a change of attitudes. To many, it seemed that something was missing; on so many levels, it appeared that little had really changed.

But Pope Francis, merely by his presence and his approach, appears to be causing a noticeable shift.

One of the outstanding things about Francis’ various encounters is that there is — though it may be overlooked — a genuine sense of friendship and affection between the pope and his dialogue partners. This is most evident in the relationship between Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew. It is very obvious that they like and trust each other; they are friends. This has led to extraordinary cooperation between the two leaders and their churches in areas of ecology, human rights, refugees and immigration. Both are very smart men. They realize that friendship and trust alone will not overcome the divisions between the churches.

They also realize, however, that all the convergence statements and joint declarations remain merely pieces of paper if trust and affection are lacking between the churches and their leaders.

This brings us to this week’s historic meeting. One can see a similar phenomenon between Pope Francis and Sheikh al Tayyeb. Al Azhar University broke off relations with the Holy See in 2011 after Pope Benedict XVI’s statement on the situation of Coptic Christians. Relations between the Holy See and Al Azhar were resumed under Pope Francis. The pope and the sheikh have met several times and it is clear that a warm and cordial relationship has developed between them.

Neither man, of course, is naïve about issues dividing Catholics and Muslims. However, both have achieved a level of trust that allows them to cooperate on a document which is at once truly Catholic — and truly Muslim.

Much of CNEWA’s work, of course, involves work among Muslims, especially in the Middle East. Witnessing this historic moment, with its spirit of cooperation and collaboration, is both an inspiration and a beacon of hope.

And it should serve as a sign to us all. Pope Francis has shown that theological ecumenism is not dead, but that it needs the human components of trust and friendship to transform theological papers into living documents that can change lives and help make our world a better, safer place.



Tags: Pope Francis Ecumenism Muslim Abu Dhabi

7 February 2019
Greg Kandra




M.L. Thomas, CNEWA’s regional director in India, pays a visit to Home of Faith, an orphanage in Kerala, one of the many institutions CNEWA is privileged to support. Read more about how CNEWA practices ”accompaniment” on behalf of the Holy Father and in the name of the church in the December 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: John E. Kozar/CNEWA)



Tags: India

7 February 2019
Greg Kandra




ISIS holdouts are continuing to fight, but many are fleeing the last villages they control in Syria. (video: CBS News/YouTube)

Families and fighters flee ISIS’ last village (BBC) Men, women and children, some with serious injuries, others describing running out of food, have been leaving the group’s rapidly shrinking enclave, which the US military on Tuesday said amounted to about 50 sq km (20 sq miles). They have been arriving at the village of Baghuz to surrender to the US-backed Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF)…

Indian court rules change of religion doesn’t alter tribal status (UCANews.com) The high court in India’s Chhattisgarh state has ruled that the tribal status of a person will not alter if they change their religion to Christianity, stressing they can still enjoy state concessions aimed at improving the life of indigenous people…

New hopes for reopening Greek Orthodox seminary on Turkish island (The Washington Post) American presidents, religious freedom advocates, the European Union and Orthodox Christian leaders have for years issued desperate appeals to Turkey’s government to reopen a shuttered Greek Orthodox seminary on an island off Istanbul, but to no avail. Before it was closed in 1971, the Theological School of Halki stood for more than a century as the primary center of scholarship and clerical training for generations of Greek Orthodox leaders. Now, stripped of its educational role, its classrooms — emptied by arguments over politics, nationalism and minority rights — are kept pristine in the stubborn hope the students will someday return…

Does God want religious diversity? Abu Dhabi text raises questions (CNS) That many religions exist in the world is a fact, but what that plurality communicates to believers about God is a question that theologians are still discussing. Pope Francis and Sheik Ahmad el-Tayeb, grand imam of al-Azhar, a leading authority for many Sunni Muslims, stepped into the debate on 4 February when they signed a document on “human fraternity” and improving Christian-Muslim relations…

Orthodox Church changes jurisdictions (AsiaNews) The Russian Orthodox parish of San Remo, whose priest Dionisij Bajkov had been suspended in recent days by the Greek metropolitan of Italy Ghennadios (Zervos), has left the jurisdiction of Constantinople to join the Russian Orthodox Church abroad, the so-called Zarubežnaja. The parish priest with the community members also invited the other parishes of the former Russian archdiocese of Europe to join the new destination…



Tags: Syria India Turkey ISIS

6 February 2019
Greg Kandra




The Rev. Teshome Fikre Woldetensae helps serve the faithful of Holy Savior Church in Addis Ababa. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)

The current edition of ONE features a Letter from Ethiopia, written by the Rev. Teshome Fikre Woldetensae, a priest from the Eparchy of Emdibir in central Ethiopia. He describes with great poignancy what it is like to be a priest in that corner of the world:

I remember with great joy the visit I made when I was a parish priest to an old lady who was gravely ill, who used to live very far from the parish — a three-hour mule ride. It was a very rainy season and access to the village was very difficult. The village catechist and I covered most of the road on foot, since it was difficult to ride on mule. She was not expecting us, due to the weather. When we arrived, she could not believe it; she shouted with joy and felt relieved from her sickness for a time. The joy of that woman, in her final days of her earthly life, was exceptional for me and it touched me deeply.

I also think often about young Bedilu. He was 12 when I met him, living with his mother, Kelemua. Bedilu was born with a degenerative condition. He could not talk, and while he could stand and walk in his younger years, he eventually became bedridden. One day Kelemua came to me from her faraway village and asked me to go with her to visit her beloved son. I asked why, and she cried and cried.

Together, she and I went by car and entered the house where Bedilu was living. Seeing him and the place they lived — a small hut — broke my heart and I could not stop crying. I was very much impressed by the dedication and joy of Kelemua for serving her child.

I gave her what money I had, promising to support her and her son. I immediately wrote a letter to one of my friends in Italy explaining the situation, and before long I received funds to build a decent house for them. We bought a proper bed and other household goods — even a cow, for milk. Within a few months, the life situation of the family changed. Although doctors informed us that his condition could not be reversed, and only palliative care was possible, Bedilu and Kelemua had a greatly improved quality of life for years.

When he died, it was devastating for all of us who were involved in his life. His mother’s heart was broken, and we accompanied her in her grief. Kelemua’s strength and courage will remain with me forever.

Read more of his letter in the December 2018 edition of ONE.



Tags: Ethiopia

6 February 2019
CNEWA Staff




Jim Kingham and Anastasia Shkilnyk. (photo: courtesy Jim Kingham)

The current edition of ONE contains the hope-filled story of how Caritas Ukraine — with support from CNEWA — is offering the elderly poor a Window to the World, giving new life and possibility to some of the country’s neediest men and women.

In the course of his reporting, writer Mark Raczkiewycz spoke with Jim Kingham from Canada who, along with his now deceased wife, Anastasia Shkilnyk, has been an ardent supporter of this work:

They have contributed more than a half million dollars to implement a program in Ukraine similar to one in Canada: Medical equipment is purchased for Caritas, which in turn lends or rents it to the elderly. Family members then are shown how to use walkers and other life-easing equipment with their older relatives.

They started donating because, as he told us, “we felt that … elderly people have given so much to their children, too often not appreciated or recognized, that the least we could do is offer a little comfort, with freedom from financial worries when they need medical equipment, while still preserving their dignity.”

Five years ago, we told the story of the Kinghams on our blog — and noted with sadness the death of Jim’s wife, Anastasia:

We have known Anastasia as a generous person who strived to make the world a better place and who succeeded in changing many hearts.

Being a Ukrainian Canadian, she cared particularly about the marginalized people of Canada and Ukraine; however, her generosity knew no geographic borders. During her fulfilling life, she championed the principles of social justice and spent enormous amounts of personal time and resources to help victims of discrimination.

In 2013, together with her husband Dr. Jim Kingham, she established with CNEWA Canada a special endowment fund to support social justice projects in Ukraine. A modest woman, Anastasia refused to have the endowment named after her. This year, the endowment will start continuously supporting the charitable initiatives of Caritas Ukraine. One of these projects will be lending medical equipment, free of charge, to poor people with serious temporary and permanent disabilities.

The legacy of Anastasia’s writings, actions and of her sacrificial love will continue transforming lives in many countries. You can read more about her remarkable life in this tribute*, on the website for Ukrainian Catholic University.

To discover more of the good fruits of the Kinghams’ generosity — and the generosity of so many others around the world — read Windows to the World in the December 2018 edition of ONE.

* [Editor’s note: The original “tribute” hyperlink destination no longer exists; the link in the text now points to an Archive.Org preserved copy. For another Ukrainian Catholic University piece celebrating the life of Anastasia Shkilnyk, click here.]



Tags: Ukraine CNEWA Canada Caritas

6 February 2019
Greg Kandra




The video above shows highlights of Pope Francis' historic trip to the UAE.
(video: Vatican Media/YouTube)


Pope confers honor on Imam’s former councillor (Vatican News) Pope Francis has conferred the ‘Commenda con Placca dell’Ordine Piano’ upon Dr. Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Salam, former councillor of the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, in gratitude for his work in strengthening relations between al-Azhar and the Catholic Church…

Iraq cardinal calls for end to persecution (The National) The mistreatment of Christians in the Middle East remains one of Pope Francis’ primary concerns, especially as the region remains engulfed in conflicts from Iraq to Syria and Yemen, according to the head of Iraq’s Catholic Church. Cardinal Louis Raphael Sako, Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans and head of the Chaldean Catholic Church, told The National that Pope Francis is seeking to turn a page in Christian-Muslim relations…

Politics suspected in burning of Marian statue in India (UCANews.com) A Marian statue was set on fire in India’s Madhya Pradesh state in the latest attack against Christians amid reports that more than 1,000 such attacks have occurred in the past year. Church leaders suspect the attack could have political undertones ahead of the national election due to take place in two months…

School in India celebrates Don Bosco (Vatican News) A Catholic school in extreme north-east India celebrated the feast of Don Bosco with an exhibition to promote and strengthen friendship with the created world. The Light of the World School (LWS) in Miao Diocese in Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh organized the exhibition on the theme, ‘Peace with Nature’ on the occasion of the 31 January feast of Don Bosco…

The Syrian-Armenian refugee jewelers of Yerevan (Al Jazeera) Vahe Hovhannesian is one of tens of thousands of Christian Armenians who have returned in the wake of Syria’s civil war. Two years ago, he was living in Aleppo, dodging snipers on his way to work…



Tags: Syria India Iraq Pope Francis Arabs

5 February 2019
J.D. Conor Mauro




The Rev. Boulos Nassif teaches a class for deaf and hearing-impaired Egyptians in Minya. To learn more about the people Father Nassif serves, read Signs of Hope in the December 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Roger Anis)



Tags: Egypt Education Catholic Disabilities





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