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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
24 October 2018
Greg Kandra




The video above shows the aftermath of recent U.S.-led attacks in Syria. A monitoring group says such attacks over the last four years have claimed the lives of more than 3,200 civilians. (video: RT/YouTube)

Report: U.S.-led forces have killed more than 3,200 Syrian civilians (PressTV.com) A so-called monitoring group says more than 3,200 civilians have lost their lives ever since the US-led coalition purportedly fighting the Daesh Takfiri terrorist group launched its aerial bombardment campaign in the conflict-plagued Arab country more than four years ago. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Thursday that as many as 3,222 civilians have been killed in the air raids…

How Syrian refugees strain—and strengthen—Jordan (The Christian Science Monitor) The influx of 1.3 million Syrians since 2012, including 130,000 students, has put Jordan’s cash-strapped schools, hospitals, housing, roads, and water networks under tremendous stress. And international donor fatigue is leaving the kingdom to face these challenges alone. But despite cuts in services and increased competition for jobs, Jordanians have until now remained sympathetic to their neighbors’ plight, carrying the added burden with few complaints…

Jerusalem’s mayor makes rare visit to refugee camp (The Times of Israel) Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat visited the Shuafat refugee camp in East Jerusalem on Tuesday as part of his drive to push the United Nation’s Palestinian refugee organization out of the capital and replace its operations with municipal services. Barkat met with city sanitation workers who entered the Palestinian neighborhood for the first time ever to carry out trash removal and other cleaning services…

India refuses to ban firecrackers during religious holidays (UCANews.com) India’s Supreme Court has refused to impose a blanket ban on firecrackers but has restricted their use during festivities including Christmas and New Year. The top court on 23 October permitted the use of firecrackers with reduced emission and decibel levels during festivals when Indians usually burst them as an expression of joy…

Turkey helps draw visitors to ancient Ethiopian mosque (Daily Sabah) Located in the town of Wuqro, 790 kilometers (over 490 miles) north of Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa, Al-Nejashi is said to be the first mosque in Africa. It is named after Nejashi, the then Ethiopian king who hosted companions of the Prophet Muhammed (Peace Be Upon Him) who escaped persecution in Mecca…



Tags: Syria India Ethiopia Jordan

23 October 2018
CNEWA Staff




The interior of this church at Mt. Carmel has been renovated, with new lighting and an improved sound system provided by CNEWA. (photo: CNEWA)

Last week, Laura Schau-Tarazi, in our Jerusalem office, sent us this picture with a note:

On 14 October, CNEWA’s regional director in Jerusalem, Joseph Hazboun, attend the celebration at the Church of the Carmelite Sisters of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Haifa, for the consecration of the newly renovated church and altar.

CNEWA generously covered the costs to improve the interior lighting and sound system of the church, which has helped complete the entire renovation project.

The Monastery Notre Dame du Mont Carmel has a beautiful old church that serves as a venue for local ceremonies and celebrations of the feasts of the order. It also serves as a place of solace and reflection for spiritual retreats. Many weddings and baptisms by the local Christian community are also held at the church.

The church required significant rehabilitation work to the interior of the building, as it suffered from significant damage from water and weather over many years. Additionally, the ground floor became uneven . Most recently, the church tiles were repaired, damage from humidity was treated, and the altar was restructured to meet the needs of the cloistered sisters and the local community.

Despite these changes, the sisters still required funds to improve the interior lighting, which was often too dim. It frequently malfunctioned during events and consumed a lot of electricity. (It is important to note that the sisters had already selected for this work, Melloncelli, an Italian firm that visited the Monastery and designed a lighting system for the church, without taking any charges for the design).

The lighting and sound system provided by CNEWA have significantly reduced electricity consumption and improved the quality of worship in the church.

Thank you to our generous donors, who have helped to bring light to the faithful in the Holy Land — literally! Projects such as these help support the prayerful good work of religious sisters, serve to enhance the spiritual experience for so many, while also giving honor to our Lord and his Blessed Mother.



Tags: Holy Land

23 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Ukrainian Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk, major archbishop of Kiev-Halych, arrives for a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican on 23 October. The archbishop says the recent split in the Orthodox Church will harm ecumenical dialogue. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

UN: 88 percent of Syrian refugees want to return home (The Daily Star) The head of the U.N. agency for refugees in Lebanon has said that 88 percent of Syrian refugees residing in Lebanon want to return to their homeland, the state-run National News Agency reported Sunday. The UNHCR official, Mireille Girard, suggested that the main reasons preventing Syrians from returning are practical, security concerns, and have nothing to do with the question of political settlement in Syria or the need to rebuild homes…

Jordan economy groans under weight of refugee crisis (The Irish Times) Jordan faces “a severe debt crisis due to low economic growth as a result of closed borders, reduced international assistance and low economic productivity”, states Dr Mary Kawar, Jordan’s minister of planning and international cooperation…

Moscow’s veto on Catholic/Orthodox dialogue may be slipping away (Crux) In a recent interview with Crux, Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk of Ukraine, head of the country’s Greek Catholic Church, said “this step by the Church of Constantinople has destroyed certain schemes of ecumenical dialogue that took hold during the time of the Cold War…”

Kerala to distribute crops, free seeds to flood-hit families (IANS)Two months after floods caused havoc in Kerala and flattened major standing crops, the state government has decided to distribute crop inputs, particularly seeds, as a part of the rehabilitation package for affected farmers…

Business hopes and refugee woes after Ethiopia-Eritrea peace deal (Al Jazeera) While the border reopening has seen business boom in border towns in both countries, the number of migrants and refugees from Eritrea to Ethiopia has grown, with many citing Eritrea’s struggling economy, continuing indefinite conscription and political repression…

Swim team braves polluted waters off Gaza (GulfNews.com) On one of the world’s most polluted coastlines, 30 young Palestinians dive head first into the sea off the Gaza Strip, their minds filled with dreams of Olympic glory. Aged between 11 and 16, they make up a rare swimming club in the Palestinian enclave, and perhaps its only mixed-sex one. Coach Amjad Tantish talks through a warm-up before they race from the trash-strewn beach into the sea as he continues to bark instructions…



Tags: Syria India Ethiopia Gaza Strip/West Bank Russian Orthodox Church

22 October 2018
Greg Kandra




The Trippadam Psychosocial Rehabilitation Center offers Indian women in need a safe, loving home. Read how CNEWA reaches out to them and so many others in the September 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: John E. Kozar)



Tags: India CNEWA

22 October 2018
Judith Sudilovsky, Catholic News Service




St. Paul VI left an enduring legacy on the Holy Land. (photo: CNS)

For Holy Land Christians, St. Paul VI left behind a legacy of Catholic institutions to serve and strengthen the community.

On a more personal level, for two Catholic families living in the Old City of Jerusalem, he left behind a special blessing and a relic which has taken on more significance for them after his canonization by Pope Francis on 14 October.

During his January 1964 visit to the Old City, which then was under Jordanian rule, St. Paul VI made a spontaneous stop to the home of a sick man to hear his confession. Upon leaving the man’s home, he was received with a traditional cup of coffee from Fairuz Orfali and greeted by Laila Soudah, neighbors who shared the same courtyard.

The Orfali family has kept the plain white cup safely stored in a felt-lined glass and wooden box while the Soudahs have photographs of the visit.

After the pope took a symbolic sip of the coffee, Orfali, in the old local tradition of welcoming honored guests, poured the remains of the coffee at the pope’s feet.

The cup remains as it was: coffee grounds still at the bottom and around its side.

“It gives me chills now, especially that he has been canonized,” said Soudah’s daughter, Hania, 52, who had not yet been born during the visit. Her oldest sister Hanady was blessed by the future saint as were others in the courtyard.

“This was the first visit of a pope to the Holy Land. My grandparents, mother, father, our neighbors welcomed him in the traditional way. This is now something to be passed down generations of our family,” Hania said.

“Who am I that the pope should come to visit us?” her father, Issa, 84, said as he leafed through a folder with photographs of the visit. “We moved flower pots so there would be room. We were very honored he visited our house.”

During the visit, St. Paul VI called for the establishment of social rehabilitation and development projects. His call eventually led to the founding of Bethlehem University, Ephpheta Institute for hearing-impaired children, Tantur Ecumenical Institute, and Notre Dame of Jerusalem Pilgrimage Center.

As early as the 1940s, the future pope -- Msgr. Giovanni Battista Montini -- in his capacity as Pope Paul XII’s assistant responsible for displaced Palestinian refugees, had championed the Pontifical Mission Society’s relief efforts and continued to do so throughout his papacy.

At a November 1948 meeting in the Vatican, Msgr. Montini named the head of Catholic Near East Welfare Association at the time, Msgr. Thomas J. McMahon, to lead a papal mission specifically for displaced persons in Palestine which became the Pontifical Mission for Palestine. Pope Pius entrusted the mission to CNEWA.

As pope, he continued to show a deep commitment to CNEWA’s work by beginning his pontificate with the historic trip to the Holy Land, which he called a “pilgrimage of prayer and penance.”

“He wanted to establish such institutions that would help empower the situation of the local (Christian) community in the Holy Land,” said Joseph Hazboun, CNEWA regional director in Jerusalem.

The apostolic delegate in Jerusalem at the time, then-Father Pio Laghi, was a close friend of the pope and teamed with CNEWA and other organizations to make the pontiff’s ideas a reality.

“At that time, we were under Jordan rule with a majority of Muslims so for us these were very important,” said John Orfali, Laila Soudah’s son. “It made us feel that we belong here.”

The establishment of the Bethlehem University provided for the first time a school of higher learning for young Palestinians so they would not have to go abroad to study and boost emigration. The three other organizations continue their original mission, Hazboun said.

The initiatives St. Paul VI promoted testified to his belief in the church as an instrument of reconciliation and hope, CNEWA said in a statement about the canonization.

“St. Pope Paul VI left a large legacy and an example for many to follow in his quiet and humble way,” Hazboun said. “Really what we need now is humble people who can set aside the difficulties and disagreements that have accumulated over 1,000 years creating divisions which are due to political issues rather than theological issues. The unfortunate division still continues making it difficult to achieve unity.”

A year following his pilgrimage, Pope Paul VI issued the groundbreaking declaration “Nostra Aetate” on relations of the church to non-Christian religions.

“He was the continuation of the revolution but a completely different personality,” Rabbi David Rosen, director of the American Jewish Committee’s Department of Interreligious Affairs, said of St. Paul VI. He noted that most Israelis -- unfairly in his opinion -- have a mixed response to St. Paul VI’s Holy Land visit because he refused to meet with Israeli leaders in Jerusalem and met them instead in the northern city of Megiddo.

“It was seen as a great thing by Israel, but as it did not lead to anywhere, no establishment of relations, there was a sense in Israel of a letdown,” Rabbi Rosen explained. “With the rapid pace of Pope John XXIII, there had been expectations which were not met. But I feel he really tried to move forward.”

He delivered a warm speech in Megiddo, said Rabbi Rosen, testing the waters but needing to be cautious because there was negative reaction from the Arab world. Still, in 1974, he established the Pontifical Commission for Relations with the Jews.

CNEWA also recalled the new saint’s desire to bring unity across religious lines.

“We remain deeply grateful for the love and passion he brought to his papacy, and which he shared so selflessly with the suffering peoples in the Holy Land, a place now so fraught with division, hardship and violence,” CNEWA said it its statement. “So many of those we serve need his prayerful intercession now, more than ever.”

The video below, from British Pathé, shows highlights of Paul VI’s historic 1964 pilgrimage to the Holy Land.



22 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Friends comfort the relative of a train victim following Friday's accident near Amritsar, India. (Vatican Media/ANSA)

Holy See reiterates Israel-Palestine two-state solution (Vatican News) The Holy See has reiterated its unwavering support for a fair, durable and early solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, through the resumption of negotiations aimed at reaching a Two-State solution, with Israel and a Palestinian State living side by side in peace and security within internationally-recognized borders. Archbishop Bernardito Auza, the Holy See’s Permanent Observer to the United Nations in New York made the call in an address on Thursday to a UN Security Council debate on the situation in the Middle East and the Palestinian question…

Indian bishops express shock and sorrow at train disaster (Vatican News) India’s Catholic bishops have expressed shock and sadness at a tragic train accident Friday night near Amritsar city in the northern Punjab state, that killed at least 60 and injured many others. A large crowd had gathered on the railway tracks to watch the celebrations of the popular Hindu festival of Dussehra, which involved the burning of a firecracker-filled effigy of demon king Ravana and a fireworks display…

Report: Russian Orthodox seeking Vatican support on split (Herald Malaysia) Pope Francis received Friday in the Vatican a Russian Orthodox delegation led by Metropolitan Hilarion, head of the Department for Foreign Affairs of the Moscow Patriarchate. The meeting was held behind closed doors, and the Vatican Press Office did not release any official information concerning the content of the meeting. According to the statements on the eve, the Russian metropolitan came to see the Pope in order to explain the decisions of the Synod of the Moscow Patriarchate, which during its meeting on Monday in Minsk decided to suspend Eucharistic communion with the Patriarchate of Constantinople after the latter re-admitted Ukrainian bishops excommunicated by Moscow…

Coalition air strike targets mosque in Syria used by ISIS (The National) An air strike by the US-led coalition fighting ISIS targeted a mosque in Syria last week because it was determined to be an insurgent “command-and-control center”, the US said on Sunday. It denied that it had targeted civilians in the deadly raid in eastern Syria. The coalition said that while the law of war protects mosques, the use of the building as a headquarters by ISIS caused it to lose that protected status. It said a dozen fighters were killed…

Is Ethiopia taking control of the Nile? (CNN) The Blue Nile River is the Nile’s largest tributary and supplies about 85 percent of the water entering Egypt. Ethiopia is building its $5 billion Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile, near the border with Sudan. When completed, it will be the largest dam in Africa, generating around 6,000 megawatts of electricity for both domestic use and export. Ethiopia’s ambitious project is designed to help lift its fast-growing population out of poverty. But the new dam also puts management of the flow of the Blue Nile in Ethiopia’s hands -- and that has sparked a power shift in the region…

Pope promotes Share the Journey global pilgrimage (Vatican News) Pope Francis gave a special greeting at the Angelus prayer on Sunday to Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle and participants in a global pilgrimage expressing solidarity with migrants and refugees. ”You’ve just completed a short pilgrimage within Rome,” the Pope said, “to express your desire to walk together and thus learn to know each other better…”



Tags: Syria India Ethiopia Russian Orthodox

19 October 2018
J.D. Conor Mauro




Amir Maher, a Coptic Catholic seminarian studying in Cairo, greets Deacon Boutros Yousef Yacoub in his hometown of Al Wasta, outside of Assiut. You can read more about Mr. Maher and his journey into a life of service in the September 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Roger Anis)



Tags: Egypt Priests Seminarians

19 October 2018
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this photo from 2006, Palestinian mothers and their children await their turns at a clinic of the Near East Council of Churches in Gaza. (photo: Bernard Sabella)

U.N. envoy warns Gaza is imploding (Al Monitor) With its economy in a freefall and tensions rising with Israel, the Hamas-ruled enclave of Gaza is imploding, the UN envoy for the Middle East warned Thursday. Nickolay Mladenov delivered the warning to the Security Council a day after Israeli warplanes struck the Gaza Strip in retaliation at rocket firings from the Palestinian territory. “Gaza is imploding. This is not hyperbole. This is not alarmism. It is a reality,” Mladenov told the council…

U.S. mission to Palestinians to be folded into U.S. embassy in Jerusalem (Los Angeles Times) The United States will fold the operations of the Consulate General in Jerusalem into the new American Embassy in Israel, Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo said on Thursday, effectively shuttering its diplomatic representation to the Palestinian Authority here. The move comes weeks after the United States ordered the office in Washington that served as the Palestinians’ de facto embassy there closed…

World Council of Churches reiterates call for release of Syrian archbishops (Christian Today) The World Council of Churches (W.C.C.) has repeated its call for the release of two archbishops abducted in Syria five years ago. Syriac Orthodox Archbishop Yohanna Ibrahim and Greek Orthodox Archbishop Paul Yazigi were kidnapped at gunpoint outside Aleppo in April 2013 and haven’t been seen since…

U.N.: Eradicating poverty not a question of charity but of justice and human rights (Vatican News) The United Nations International Day for the Eradication of Poverty was observed across the globe on Wednesday. In a message for the occasion, U.N. Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres urged the international community to uphold the core pledge of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development of leaving no one behind in its fight to eradicate poverty in all its forms and dimensions…

Ending India’s gap between rich and poor Catholics (UCAN India) The growth of communities dedicated to responding to poverty across India — such as the Small Christian Community of Immaculate Conception Church in the Diocese of Poona — help narrow a rich-poor divide, and caste-based discrimination, in hundreds of village parishes…

Water pollution threatens Mandaean religious practices in Iraq (Christian Science Monitor) Mandaeans, a minority religious group following the teachings of John the Baptist, have worshipped at the banks of the Tigris River for hundreds of years. Today, industrial chemicals and untreated sewage make it difficult for the Mandaeans to practice religious rites…

Beit Jamal Catholic cemetery desecrated again (Fides) Twenty-eight graves of the cemetery attached to the Salesian convent of Beit Jamal, near the Israeli city of Beit Shemesh, has one again been desecrated by unknown persons. This was discovered on Wednesday 17 October…

U.N. Official: Syria has withdrawn controversial property law (AINA) A U.N. humanitarian aid official said Thursday that Syria’s government has withdrawn a controversial law that allowed authorities to seize property left behind by civilians who fled the country’s civil war, calling it a good sign that “diplomacy can win”…

Tensions high in Kerala as Hindu temple opens gates to women (The Guardian) A standoff is under way in the south Indian state of Kerala, where mainly female protesters are attempting to stop other women from entering the Sabarimala temple. On Wednesday, the Hindu shrine opened its gates for the first time since 28 September, after the supreme court struck down an entry ban on women of menstruating age. The judges ruled the ban against girls and women aged between 10 and 50 as discriminatory and, therefore, unconstitutional…



Tags: Syria India Iraq Gaza Strip/West Bank Palestine

18 October 2018
Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D.




Russian Orthodox worshippers pray during a liturgy in 2017 at St. Isaac's Cathedral in St. Petersburg. (photo: CNS/Anatoly Maltsev, EPA)

Editor’s note: Monday, the Christian world was rocked by the news that the Patriarchate of Moscow, which governs the Orthodox Church of Russia, was breaking its ties with the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.

While the history behind this is long and complex, its effects today cannot be ignored or easily dismissed. Millions of Christians around the world could ultimately be affected — especially those in the world of CNEWA.

Here’s a brief Q &A with Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D. , in which he addresses some of the questions we had about this break and its significance.

Okay. So the patriarchate in Moscow has announced it is breaking relations with the Ecumenical Patriarchate in Constantinople. What does that mean?

Initially it means that the Orthodox Church of Russia will no longer pray for the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople. It can develop to the point where Russian Orthodox Christians will no longer be able to attend the liturgies of the Ecumenical Patriarchate and that Russian Orthodox bishops and priests will not be able to concelebrate liturgies with those Orthodox churches in full communion with the Ecumenical Patriarchate. In other words, they are no longer in full communion. It is technically an excommunication.

Why are they doing this?

Because the Ecumenical Patriarch has begun the process which leaves room for a fully autonomous Orthodox Church of Ukraine. The Patriarch of Constantinople, who is considered the “first among equals” in the Orthodox communion of churches, traditionally has the right to do this. The Moscow Patriarchate, however, believes that Ukraine is part of its ecclesiastical territory.

What are the immediate effects of this?

Probably cessation of talks and relations between Moscow and Constantinople.

How does this impact those we serve?

CNEWA works in Ukraine where there are four Christian — three Orthodox and one Catholic — churches. While working primarily with the Catholic Church, CNEWA maintains good relations with the other churches. This will be greatly complicated and hostilities both old and new might surface.

Has this happened before?

Yes, this has happened before. Tragically, schisms remain a seemingly unavoidable part of Christian history. There were schisms after most of the Ecumenical Councils of the first five centuries; there was the schism between the East and West in 1054 and the great schism in the west brought on by the Reformation. Also, there have been schisms in the last two centuries involving other patriarchates, but these were healed eventually.

Why should we care?

A divided and mutually hostile Christianity is contrary to the will of Christ and undermines the ability of the church in preaching the Gospel. It took almost 1500 years to begin to heal the schisms of the first five centuries; discussions to heal the schism of 1054 are sporadic and of very varying success; the divisions of the Reformation, while showing some tractability, are still strong. This could have a lasting impact on any efforts to advance Christian Unity. With this in mind, we should fervently pray — as Jesus did in John’s Gospel — ”that all may be one.”



Tags: Ecumenism Russian Orthodox Church

18 October 2018
Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service




Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk, head of external relations for the Russian Orthodox Church, and Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, leave a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican 18 October. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

Firm in their faith in Jesus and working together, Orthodox and Catholic young people can resist forces trying to remove all traces of faith from society and even could reverse that trend, Russian Orthodox Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk told the Synod of Bishops.

Speaking to the synod on 18 October as one of the “fraternal delegates” or ecumenical observers at the gathering, Metropolitan Hilarion said that, since the fall of communism, young people have been returning to the Orthodox Church in Russia.

And, he said, “the upbringing of youth in the Christian spirit is a project that we, the Orthodox, are willing to implement together with the Catholics.”

Since 2015, the Moscow Patriarchate and the Vatican have cooperated to promote exchange programs for their seminarians and young clergy. The Orthodox visit the Vatican and the Catholics spend time in Russia, which “helps us to overcome misconceptions, enriches us spiritually and lays the foundation for cooperation between our churches.”

At a time when young people are bombarded by conflicting information about what they should want and what they should strive for, Christian leaders must help young people learn the art of discernment, he said.

“The contemporary mission of the church,” Metropolitan Hilarion said, is “to teach the younger generation to distinguish good from evil, truth from falsehood, the genuine and truly valuable from that which is instant, transient and superficial.”

Young people need the moral values the church teaches, and they need prayer, liturgy and the sacraments, he said. But “the most important and necessary thing that we can offer all generations is Christ crucified and risen.”

“A cultural, psychological and spiritual abyss separates the contemporary young people from Christ, from his spiritual and moral teaching,” Metropolitan Hilarion said. “Our task is to help young people to overcome this abyss, to feel that they need Christ and that he can transform their life and fill it with content, meaning and inspiration.”



Tags: Ecumenism Russian Orthodox





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