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Summer, 2014
Volume 40, Number 2
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In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
2 September 2014
Ra’ed Bahou




This Iraqi family, newly arrived in Jordan, includes two young children, with a third on the way. The father left his teaching job to flee Iraq. (photo: CNEWA)

Fleeing for their lives, Iraqi Christian refugees have started to arrive in Jordan from northern Iraq.

The first wave arrived on 13 August, and every day since then more continue to arrive at the rate of 30 to 40 a day; by mid-September, the total is expected to reach 1,000 people.

The government is granting visas for those refugees upon their arrival; transportation is arranged to take them to local churches and convents.

Five churches received the first waves of refugees. They are: Our Lady of Peace on the Airport Road (100 people), the Latin Church in Marka (45 people), the Roman Catholic Church in Marj Al Hamam (70 people), St. Charbel’s Parish (64 people), the Syrian Orthodox Church of St. Aphram in Al-Ashrafiyeh (50 people). Other news arrivals are staying with their relatives until they manage to rent a house.

To respond to this crisis, CNEWA’s office in Jordan is coordinating with our partners — church leaders, clergy, religious women and others — to analyze the situation and draw a plan for the essential needs that may change from one day to another.

In order for the refugees to receive adequate assistance, our immediate support will be given directly to the hosting churches accommodating the refugees and providing them with water, electricity, fuel, furniture, etc. Consequently, this will increase the financial burden on those churches. Additional support will be be directed to the families themselves, as most who arrived in Jordan lack even the most fundamental personal needs, such as clothes, underwear, toothpaste, shampoo, soup, and other hygiene items.

Therefore, it is very important to provide each family with a small amount of cash so they can purchase what they need.

Sister Antoinette, center, visits a house now serving as a home to four families—17 people—all living together in a three-room furnished apartment. (photo: CNEWA)

Medicine and healthcare treatment are essential; many require immediate attention, as there are a number of elderly people, handicapped, children and pregnant women. According to the Italian Hospital, most of the health programs of other organizations have been out of operation since July 2014. CNEWA is now carrying the burden of helping both Jordanians and refugees (Iraqis, Syrians and Palestinians) through the Italian hospitals in Amman and Kerak and in other hospitals as needed.

In addition to physical needs, there are psychological ones. Even though some refugees feel more secure, many are still in shock. They do not accept the reality of being displaced from their homes. The children are often terrified. For example, a three-year-old Iraqi girl who recently arrived with her family is suffering frequent panic attacks. Many of these people will need psychological treatment and support. We will be continuying our coordination with the Franciscan Sisters and a psychological specialist. We will also be supporting catechetical programs and psychosocial treatment sessions designed to help these vulnerable families.

There are many questions still to be answered. How long will the refugees be able to stay in the church halls? How long will the churches themselves be able to host them? How long they will stay in Jordan before their resettlement papers are ready? How long will the organizations be able to provide support? From our experience, after a short period, each will start step back due to lack of financial support,leaving the vulnerable people hopeless and helpless.

CNEWA will be supporting churches and helping to bear some of the cost of hosting these Iraqis by providing funds for food, housing, basic furniture, blankets and other necessities, along with medical treatment and psychological support for families who have been so severely traumatized by ISIS. Can you help us help them? Visit our special Iraq giving page to learn how you can support our suffering brothers and sisters during this moment of crisis. And please keep them in your prayers!



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2 September 2014
Greg Kandra




A refugee named Elsa stands in her home in Mai-Aini, where she has lived for more than four years. Read more about her life in an Ethiopian refugee camp in “Starting Over: Elsa’s Dream” in the Summer edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers/Panos Pictures)



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2 September 2014
Greg Kandra





In the video above, Pope Francis greets players and organizers at yesterday’s
Soccer Match for Peace.(video: Rome Reports)


Report: Russian troops strengthening positions in Ukraine (Reuters) Russian troops are strengthening their positions in eastern Ukraine and using aid shipments to smuggle in arms and other supplies to separatist forces, Kiev’s military said on Tuesday. Military spokesman Andriy Lysenko said units of Russian troops had been identified in the big regional centre of Donetsk, towns and villages to its east and in south-east areas near the Sea of Azov. Fifteen more Ukrainian servicemen were killed in fighting in the past 24 hours, Lysenko said...

Vatican: world community must stop unjust aggression in Iraq (Vatican Radio) Archbishop Silvano Tomasi is calling on the international community to take concrete steps to stop the ongoing violence and persecution of minorities in northern Iraq, to reestablish a just peace and to protect all vulnerable groups of society...

Pope Francis calls priest at Iraqi refugee camp (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis called a priest at a refugee camp in Iraq to express his closeness to the persecuted Christians who have taken refuge there and to promise his continued support. Pope Francis reportedly called Fr. Behnam Benoka on 19 August, a day after returning from his apostolic journey to South Korea. Fr Benoka is a priest of Bartella, a small Christian town near Mosul, and the vice-rector of the Catholic seminary in Ankawa...

Poll shows increased support for Hamas (ABC News) The popularity of the Hamas militant group among Palestinians in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip has spiked significantly following the 50-day war with Israel, according to an opinion poll released Tuesday. The poll, conducted by the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research and headed by leading Palestinian pollster Khalil Shikaki, indicates that 61 percent of Palestinians would choose the Islamic militant group’s leader, Ismail Haniyeh, for president if Palestinian presidential elections were held today. Only 32 percent would vote for current President Mahmoud Abbas, Hamas’ rival, the survey suggested...

Thousands attend interreligious match for peace (Vatican Radio) Thousands of sports fans, young and old, came out to Rome’s Olympic Stadium Monday night to watch football greats Roberto Baggio, Javier Zanetti and Diego Armando Maradona, among others, take part in the Interreligious Match for Peace. Players representing the Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim and Shinto religions took to the field for the 8:45 p.m. kickoff. The event was intended to gather players and fans in a moment of unity and solidarity in support of world peace and to demonstrate the power of sport in building peace...

Could alcohol probhibition work in Kerala? (Times of India) Trouble is brewing in Kerala, where the government is about to call last orders on almost all alcohol. In an Indian state that crams 35 million people and almost a million annual visitors into an area not even twice the size of Wales, planned prohibition represents a social revolution that is comparable in scale to the doomed policy that America pursued during the 1920’s...



Tags: Pope Francis Vatican Kerala Gaza Strip/West Bank Russia
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29 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Yesterday, Washington’s Cardinal Donald Wuerl celebrated Mass to mark the opening of the academic year at the Catholic University of America in Washington. But he took a moment at the ceremony’s conclusion to make a personal and impassioned plea. The brief video below is worth watching and sharing. It speaks to the conscience of the world.

The text appears on the cardinal’s blog:

Often we’re asked, “How is it possible that in human history atrocities occur?” They occur for two reasons. Because there are those prepared to commit them and there are those who remain silent. And the actions in Iraq and Syria today, what’s happening to women, children, men, their displacement — as the least of the things happening to them — is something that we really are not free to ignore and sometimes all we have to raise is our voice.

Watch the video below.

Keep our suffering brothers and sisters in Iraq and Syria in your prayers. And, if you can, please remember them in a special way by making a gift to support the work of CNEWA in Iraq. Visit this page to learn how.



Tags: Syria Iraq
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29 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Reports emerging from Syria indicate that an important Christian stronghold — the city of Mhardeh and nearby Hama — have been surrounded by ISIS and the Al Qaeda-backed rebel group Jabhat al-Nusra.

One account comes from the Middle Eastern news service Al-Monitor:

The swift deterioration of the situation in the west and north of Hama’s countryside [comes] as anti-regime forces — including Jabhat al-Nusra — advance toward the Christian city of Mhardeh, which overlooks Al-Ghab Plain, as well as in the direction of Hama’s military airport.

The militants began carrying out unprecedented attacks using BM-21 Grad missiles targeting the regime’s sites surrounding Alawite-majority towns in Masyaf city and Al-Ghab Plain.

Moreover, civilians have started fleeing Alawite villages that are located near battlefields such as the town of Arza near Hama’s military airport, which has been deserted.

A resident from an Alawite town in the western countryside of Hama told Al-Monitor, “The situation has become perilous as groups linked to Jabhat al-Nusra are approaching the region.”

“People are carrying arms at an increasingly rapid pace, while many families owning real estate in Tartous and Latakia have deserted their homes. The situation has become alarming in this region, especially since many residents expect Jabhat al-Nusra to commit massacres there, should it progress in the region. This will be in retaliation for the massacres the group accused the NDF of committing in Sunni towns — mainly in the towns of Tremseh and al-Lataminah in 2012,” he said.

A quick tour of the Alawite villages in the west of Hama’s countryside is sufficient to notice the extent of tension and alert among people, as dozens of checkpoints are deployed along the roads, while cars and pedestrians are being thoroughly searched.

Read more.



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29 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Latin Patriarch Fouad Twal of Jerusalem visits Iraqi Christian refugees in Jordan who recently fled Mosul, Iraq. Patriarch Twal praised Jordan’s efforts to help the refugees and encouraged the Christians who have remained steadfast, clinging to their faith, in the midst of persecution. (photo: CNS/courtesy Catholic Media Office)



Tags: Iraq Refugees Jordan
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29 August 2014
Greg Kandra




A woman holds a baby at a temporary tent camp set up for Ukrainian refugees near the Russian-Ukrainian border. (photo: CNS/Alexander Demianchuk)

NATO accuses Russia of violating Ukraine’s sovereignty (BBC) NATO has accused Russia of a "blatant violation" of Ukraine’s sovereignty and engaging in direct military operations to support pro-Russian rebels. Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said that “despite hollow denials”, it was now clear that Russia had illegally crossed Ukraine’s border. He said Nato would respect any Ukrainian decision on security, after its PM said he was putting the country on course for Nato membership. Russia denies sending troops and arms...

Mideast Church leaders denounce ISIS for “crimes against humanity” (Vatican Radio) The Patriarchs and Church leaders of Eastern rite churches have again denounced what they call “crimes against humanity” committed by Islamic State (formerly ISIS) militants in Iraq and Syria. Meeting outside Beirut, Lebanon, the Patriarchs condemned the persecution and killings of Christians, Yazidis and other minorities, saying the continued existence of Christians in the region is being threatened by the jihadi group’s campaign of terror. Thanking those who’ve been offering humanitarian assistance to the displaced, the Patriarchs are calling on the international community to stop the “criminal actions” of Islamic State and are challenging Islamic institutions to forcefully condemn the extremist group...

Cardinal: action needed to defend minorities in Iraq (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Thursday met with Cardinal Antonio Maria Vegliò, the President of the Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants, to discuss the plight of those fleeing the Islamist violence in Iraq. The so-called Islamic State controls large areas of both Syria and Iraq, and has been conducting a campaign of terror, especially against religious minorities, including Christians. Cardinal Vegliò told Vatican Radio the Pope said the Church must be in the forefront in efforts to defend the weak...

Major religions concentrated in just one or two countries (Pew Research Center) For several years, demographers at the Pew Research Center have been studying the demographic characteristics of eight groups: Buddhists, Christians, adherents of folk religions, Hindus, Jews, Muslims, the religiously unaffiliated and followers of other religions. While Christians and Muslims are more widely distributed around the world, the other groups have a majority of their populations in just one or two nations, according to 2010 estimates from our Global Religious Landscape report...



Tags: Iraq Ukraine Russia Muslim
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28 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Palestinian civil defense officers in Beit Lahiya, Gaza Strip, inspect the rubble of a destroyed tower shortly after the cease-fire was announced on 26 August. (photo: CNS/Mohammed Saber, EPA)

Catholic aid organizations — including CNEWA — are hoping the latest cease-fire between Israel and Hamas will hold. CNS spoke with CNEWA’s regional director in the area:

“This is a window of opportunity,” said Sami El-Yousef, Catholic Near East Welfare Association’s regional director for Israel and the Palestinian territories. “[We hope] the unity government will take the lead. A lot of people here think the stage is set [for] a meaningful resumption of negotiations. Now it is up to leaders on both sides to make it happen, to move beyond [the same political hurdles.]

“Both leaderships must rise up to the occasion for us to move forward. Otherwise, the temporary cease-fire may last for a few months, then we will be back to the resumption of hostilities.”

The cease-fire that took effect 26 August calls for the easing of the Israeli-enforced embargo to allow humanitarian aid and construction material into Gaza under strict monitoring. Egyptians, who brokered the cease-fire, will open the Rafah crossing into the Gaza Strip. Terms also include enlarging the offshore zone for Palestinian fishermen to six miles.

The agreement was the latest of numerous attempts to end a seven-week conflict in which more than 2,100 largely civilian Palestinians and 70 Israelis, including 64 soldiers, were killed.

The organizations have coordinated their aid efforts, with Caritas Jerusalem focusing on food and cash assistance while Catholic Relief Services is distributing nonfood items and CNEWA is assisting with repairing damaged homes and institutions.

Father Raed Abusahlia, director of Caritas Jerusalem, said his agency’s long-term emergency appeal would last until Christmas. He said Caritas will provide food to 2,000 families as well as a cash distribution about $350 to all the Christian families in Gaza, with specific emphasis on those who lost all of their possessions and homes.

Caritas also will provide all the necessary school supplies for the students of the five Christian schools in Gaza, although it is not clear when school will begin.

“At the same time we have already sent three truckloads of food, diapers, milk and hygiene supplies last week,” he said, noting that the almost $84,000 worth of supplies came from local Catholic parishes as well as four Israeli groups.

El-Yousef said response to CNEWA’s earlier appeal for help from its donors has surpassed expectations, largely thanks to donations from European donors; he said donations would soon top $1 million. He added that the money will be largely used to help rebuild and rehabilitate Christian homes and institutions damaged during the conflict.

Read more.

To learn how you can help Gaza’s traumatized families, please drop by our giving page.



Tags: CNEWA Gaza Strip/West Bank Israeli-Palestinian conflict Relief Middle East Peace Process
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28 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Georgian Orthodox believers pray during a service on 28 August to mark the Day of the Virgin Mary, commemorating her Assumption, at the Sioni Cathedral of the Dormition in Tbilisi, Georgia. The Day of the Virgin Mary is observed by the Georgian Orthodox Church every year on 28 August. For more on life in Tbilisi, check out Caring for Georgia’s New Orphans in the Summer edition of ONE. (photo: CNS/Zurab Kurtsikidze, EPA)



Tags: Georgia Eastern Churches Eastern Europe Georgian Orthodox Church
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28 August 2014
Jose Kavi




Mahinder Singh sits with neighbors in their tiny village in Gangapar. (photo: John Mathew)

In the Summer edition of ONE, writer Jose Kavi explores the life and times of “untouchable” Christian Dalits. Here, he offers further insight into what he saw while covering the story.

I was happy when I was asked to write an article Dalit Christians. The Indian Church has been demanding justice for its Dalit members for nearly 65 years.

An estimated 70 percent of Christians in India are of Dalit origin, mostly in the Latin Catholic Church and Protestant denominations that were introduced in India by Western missionaries.

The presence of Dalits among the Eastern churches, both Catholic and Orthodox, is around some 20 percent, concentrated mostly in Kerala, the church’s base in southern India. It is hard to identify these people of former low-caste origin, since they are well integrated into the mainstream churches.

So to write this story I turned to northern India, where the Syro-Malabar Church has several dioceses. Both Archbishop Kuriakose Bharanikulangara of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Eparchy of Faridabad and Bishop Aboon Mor Barnabas Yacob, the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church’s apostolic visitor to North India, said their churches are currently focusing mostly on their people, who have migrated to northern India from Kerala. However, they do support the church’s Dalit struggle.

Photographer John Mathew and I asked priests in the Bijnor Syro-Malabar diocese if they are doing anything for the Dalit people. They said they have a few local converts but were not sure if they belonged to any Dalit communities. The diocese covers Uttarakhand state and parts of neighboring Uttar Pradesh.

We decided to try our luck and set out to Gangapar-Birbhanwala, the diocese’s newest parish, in Uttar Pradesh. And it was a journey into new world. After traveling about five hours, we left the highways to enter a narrow dirt road. It took an hour to cover the 12 miles. We stopped at a bridge in Dhampur built over the Ramganga, one of the tributaries of the Ganges. Its blue and clean water gave us our first shock of the trip. The Ganges we have seen downstream at places such as Varanasi and Patna is no better than a sewage drain. The new government is planning to spend billions to clean up the river Hindus consider holy.

The Rev. M. J. Joseph, the young parish priest who came to the highway to guide us, said the river had changed its course only five years ago after a flood. The flood had washed away the road to Gangapar. We negotiated through farms and gutters and reached a tiny shed in the middle of an open field as the sizzling summer sun blazed above us.

“It is the parish church,” Father Joseph said with an apologetic smile. The tin-roofed shed has no cross, a normal sign of a church. There is no altar. The only Christian reminder is a painting of Jesus on the shed’s only wall. There was neither electricity nor running water. Our driver had to go to the nearby forest to answer nature’s call, as the place has no toilet.

Jarnail Singh, the church’s caretaker who lives in a room attached to the church shed with his wife and two children, asked his daughter Pinky to bring us water, which she did from the hand pump near the entrance.

Jarnail’s wife, Malkeet Kaur, readied the lunch by the time we finished exchanging pleasantries and conducting a few interviews. The special dish for the visitors was scrambled eggs.

After the lunch we set out for the villages. Most people live in thatched mud huts. Piles of cow dung cakes used as fuel and haystacks welcomed us at every entrance. Water buffaloes were tethered to poles near the huts. You could see charpai, the traditional cot that doubles up as sofa and bed, kept in the front yards.

Despite such dreary existence, everyone we met, including the aging Mahinder Singh, looked cheerful. He described his escape from Pakistan when the Indian subcontinent was divided. “I was so thirsty and went to drink from rivers, but they were filled with corpses. Then I went to wells, there also were dead bodies,” he recalled.

We asked him, “What makes you happy?”

“Prabhu Jisu” (“Lord Jesus”), he answered.

What more needed to be said?

Read more about Dalit Christians in Caste Aside from the Summer edition of ONE.



Tags: India ONE magazine Indian Christians Indian Catholics Dalits
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