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Summer, 2014
Volume 40, Number 2
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In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
17 September 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from last year, Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk presides at the consecration of
Kiev’s new cathedral. (photo: CNEWA)


This week Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York and chair of CNEWA’s board, wrote movingly of a conversation he had recently with Sviatoslav Shevchuk, the major archbishop of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. From the cardinal’s blog:

I have grown to admire this young, brave brother bishop over the last years, as we have often spent time in Rome together, and especially when I was with him last year for the dedication of the daring new Cathedral of the Resurrection in Kiev.

The Catholic Church in Ukraine is young, alive, growing, and prophetic. This, from a worldly point of view, is illogical, near miraculous, as Greek Catholics were viciously persecuted by Stalin in the years of Soviet oppression. Even after the breakup of the communist empire, and the restoration of freedom in Ukraine, Catholics were not given back their former churches that had been given to the Russian Orthodox, and the courageous yet decimated community almost had to start afresh.

Through the optic of the Gospel, we know that “the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the faith,” so believers are hardly surprised by the vitality and growth of the Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine.

Archbishop Shevchuk, like his predecessor, Cardinal Lubomyr Husar, now retired, is a true “confessor of the faith,” a pastor revered by his people, a leader in bringing unity, peace, and hope to a country threatened by thugs and thieves within, and an aggressor on the border.

I check in with him, because I worry about him, want to encourage him, and am inspired by him. My call last week found him uncharacteristically grim and apprehensive.

“Timothy, we are under attack! Our country is under siege from Russia! Our people are being murdered, their homes destroyed, not by alleged separatists in Ukraine wanting to return to Russia, but by Russian troops and mercenaries. Please see that the truth gets out. There is an invasion here.”

Last week, the Catholic bishops of Ukraine issued a chilling statement that their beloved country is “flowing in blood,” and urged Western governments — like ours — not to become “accomplices in the sin of murder.”

Just so we would understand, the Ukrainian bishops were blunt: “This peaceful, sovereign nation has been subjected to a direct military intervention by a Northern neighbor — hundreds of units of heavy weaponry and technology, thousands of armed mercenaries and soldiers of Russia’s standing army are crossing our borders of Ukraine, sowing death and destruction.”

Read more of his conversation at Cardinal Dolan’s blog.



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17 September 2014
Greg Kandra




A girl carries her brother across the Mai-Aini refugee camp near Shire in northern Ethiopia. To read about the lives of these refugees, check out Starting Over: Elsa’s Dream in the Summer edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers/Panos Pictures)



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17 September 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from May, Jordan’s King Abdullah welcomes Pope Francis during his visit to Amman.
(photo: CNS/Paul Haring)


Jordan’s King Abdullah II: We want to increase presence of Arab Christians (Fides) In the sectarian conflicts afflicting the Middle East, Jordan wants to represent “an oasis of security and stability,” while pledging to do its utmost to protect the Christian Arabs and increase their presence in the region. This is how — according to Jordan sources consulted by Fides Agency — King Abdullah II outlined the profile of his country in a meeting with government representatives convened on 16 September to outline the Jordanian position regarding the alarming progression of the jihadists of the Islamic State...

UN brokers deal to help rebuild Gaza (BBC) A deal has been agreed by Israeli and Palestinian officials to allow building materials into the Gaza Strip for reconstruction, a top UN official says. Robert Serry, special co-ordinator for the Middle East peace process, said the Palestinian Authority would play a lead role in the reconstruction effort. He said it was a step towards the aim of lifting all restrictions on Gaza. More than 100,000 people were left homeless by the recent 50-day conflict between Israel and militants in Gaza...

Coptic Christians clash with police in Egypt (AP) A couple hundred Christian protesters clashed with police in southern Egypt after holding a demonstration on Tuesday in front of a police station demanding authorities locate an abducted housewife, a security official said. The official says protesters hurled Molotov cocktails at a police station in Samalout town, in Minya province, wounding three policemen. The police arrested at least 33 protesters. The official says the demonstration was over the abduction of a 37-year-old Coptic housewife, who went missing two weeks ago...

Patriarch Kiril receives a fighter jet as a gift (The Guardian) Patriarch Kirill, the head of the Russian Orthodox church, was presented with an unlikely gift for a religious leader this week as he toured a factory in Russia’s far-east — a single-seater fighter jet SU-35. Kirill was presented with the jet after giving icons to workers at the civilian and military aircraft plant, the church said in a statement on its official website on Tuesday...

India seeks urgent aid for flood victims (Independent Catholic News) A bishop in India has described the areas engulfed by catastrophic floods last week, as ‘Ground Zero.’ Bishop Peter Celestine of Jammu-Srinagar said: “The State of Jammu and Kashmir has experienced the worst-ever floods in living history and our area is like Ground Zero.” Bishop Celestine said that as a result of the floods the lives and livelihood of the people of the state, particularly in the Kashmir region have been completely upturned...



Tags: Egypt Jordan Gaza Strip/West Bank Islam Coptic Christians
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16 September 2014
Greg Kandra




U.S. Bishops Edward J. Weisenburger of Salina, Kansas, and Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, New Mexico, stand amid rubble from buildings destroyed in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza. They visited Gaza on 14 September as part of 18 bishops’ nine-day prayer pilgrimage for peace in the Holy Land. To learn what you can do to help those whose homes have been destroyed
in Gaza, visit our giving page. (photo: CNS/Matt McGarry, CRS)




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16 September 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from June, Honduran Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga, president of Caritas Internationalis, speaks at a conference in Washington, DC. (photo: CNS/Bob Roller)

Cardinal on Middle East: “Greatest crisis since World War II” (Vatican Radio) Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga opened a high level Caritas meeting for the crises in the Middle East with an impassioned call for peace. Speaking on Monday at the start of the Rome meeting scheduled to run from 15 to 17 September, Cardinal Rodriguez, President of Caritas Internationalis, spoke of the tragedy of millions in Syria who are forced to flee their homes because of conflilct, of the violence of fundamentalist extremism in Iraq and eastern Syria, and of the predicament of Gaza inhabitants who have lost all in recent Israeli bombing. “As part of the humanitarian community” he said “we are confronted with the greatest crisis the world has faced since the Second World War...”

Pope’s envoy to Iraq: “Iraqi people must be defended” (Vatican Radio) Cardinal Fernando Filoni, the special envoy of Pope Francis to Iraq, has called the actions of the so-called Islamic State “Devil things.” Cardinal Filoni, who is Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour “no one can use the name, or in the name of God, to do things like this...”

Gaza’s housing crisis is described as “much worse than the war” (The Washington Post) Official numbers are few in Gaza City, a densely populated seaside enclave of 600,000. But businessmen, rights groups and economists agree that apartment rents here have more than doubled since the war ended, as thousands of displaced residents elbow into an already saturated housing market. Before the war, experts said, an average two-bedroom apartment went for $200 per month; now it can rent for as much as $500...

In Ukraine, rebels granted self-rule and amnesty (BBC) Ukraine’s parliament has granted self-rule to parts of eastern regions held by pro-Russian rebels, as well as an amnesty for the fighters themselves. The measures are in line with the 5 September ceasefire agreement signed by President Petro Poroshenko. The European and Ukrainian parliaments also voted to ratify a major EU-Ukraine association agreement...



Tags: Syria Iraq Middle East Ukraine Gaza Strip/West Bank
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15 September 2014
Michael J.L. La Civita




A cross is carried to the altar during an ecumenical prayer service at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington on 9 September. The service was part of the In Defense of Christians three-day summit about the persecution of Middle Eastern minorities. (photo: CNS/Tyler Orsburn)

Note: The essay below originally appeared at Patheos.com.

The dust has yet to settle from the Ted Cruz debacle at the “summit” of the nascent political action group, In Defense of Christians (IDC). Stones have been hurled from all sides — often with no clear target other than self-defense. “Lord have mercy,” said one clergyman who attended the summit, “everyone seems to use [this] sad event to support their own preconceived conclusions.”

Exactly.

In Sunday’s The New York Times, it was columnist Ross Douthat’s turn. He claims the senator’s performance demonstrates that the “American right no less than the left and center will deserve a share in the fate” of the Middle East’s “increasingly beleaguered Christian communities” that “have suffered from a fatal invisibility in the Western world.” Their plight, “has been particularly invisible in the United States, which as a majority-Christian superpower might have been expected to provide particular support.”

The columnist considers three reasons for this supposed invisibility: the political left; the strategic class; and the right, especially its conservative Christians, whom he identifies as American Catholics and evangelicals.

Long before political strategists forged an alliance among so-called Christian “value voters” — when Catholics were just Catholics, not pawns divided by political lobbyists and strategists to engage in the culture wars — American Catholics provided significant support to their Christian sisters and brothers in the Middle East. Whether as donors to Catholic charities such as the Catholic Near East Welfare Association (CNEWA), founded in 1926, or as members of chivalric orders such as the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem or the Order of Malta, American Catholics helped to build and sustain the many social service institutions of the churches in the Middle East. These church-run colleges and clinics, schools and child care programs, nursing homes and special needs facilities, halfway houses and substance abuse programs have served not just Christians, but generations of Alawis, Druze, Jews and Shiite and Sunni Muslims.

“Not only have American Catholics helped to build these social service institutions,” said CNEWA’s president, Msgr. John E. Kozar, “they have helped sustain the infrastructures of the churches that remain beacons of peace and stability in the Middle East.”

American Catholic generosity and concern for the other is not rooted in or sustained by a political cause or political ideology. Rather, it has been their Christian faith, which compels them to love their neighbor as themselves. And while that American Catholic generosity is exceptional, it is not isolated. Organizations in Europe and Canada have, since the middle of the 19th century, provided financial resources as well as priests, sisters and brothers at the service of all people in the Middle East.

Despite the enormous challenges affecting the churches of the West — many self-imposed — Catholics of the West have not lost sight of their sisters and brothers in the Middle East, nor have they abandoned the needs of the region’s non-Christians. They have rushed emergency aid to displaced families fleeing the civil war in Syria, the violent implosion of Iraq and the violence in Gaza even as they continue to support the formation of priests and religious sisters and brothers in Egypt, Iraqi Kurdistan and Lebanon.

Now, however, fresh from the political and legal battles waged over issues of religious liberty in the United States, the American “strategic class” has stepped in with its clients — elected politicians. Suddenly, claiming indifference on the part of the West, these Beltway policy wonks, lobbyists and talking heads have rushed to save the Middle East’s Christians from genocidal persecution at the hands of suicidal Muslim extremists. Employing the language framing U.S.-style religious liberty battles to describe the plight of Middle East Christians, they risk politicizing an issue that concerns all people of good will, thus excluding the vast majority of Americans weary of the divisive and bitter partisan battles marking American culture today.

There’s much more. Read the complete essay at Patheos.com.



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15 September 2014
Greg Kandra




A Christian man from Qaraqosh, Iraq, who was forced to flee from advancing Islamic State militants in Mosul, cuts another man’s hair in front of tents near Erbil on 10 September.
(photo: CNS/Mohamed Messara, EPA)




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15 September 2014
Greg Kandra




Retired Bishop Michael D. Pfeifer of San Angelo, Texas, stands in front of the Israeli separation wall near Jerusalem on 12 September. Bishop Higgins was one of 18 bishops on a nine-day prayer pilgrimage for peace in the Holy Land. (photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)

Pope laments the “madness of war” (Vatican Radio) “We have yet to learn the lesson from the madness of war,” lamented Pope Francis Sunday as he launched two appeals following the midday Angelus prayer with faithful and tourists in St Peter’s Square...

Heavy fighting reported in Ukraine over the weekend (Washington Post) The heaviest fighting in a series of truce violations in Ukraine’s restive east strained the tenuous 10-day-old cease-fire between the Kiev government and pro-Russian separatists, with both sides blaming the other Monday for attacks that included the shelling of residential buildings. Ukrainian military spokesman Andriy Lysenko on Monday accused the rebels of attacking checkpoints and other positions in the east in intensified fighting over the weekend. The Ukrainian military, he said, was forced to respond...

Bishop criticizes senator for politicizing summit on Mideast Christians (CNS) A Catholic bishop criticized Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, for politicizing a conference of diverse political and church leaders working on behalf of Christians and other minorities in the Middle East. “When you come to a hard political stance on anything, it’s going to cause a flare-up, and that’s what happened last night,” Maronite Bishop Gregory J. Mansour of Brooklyn, New York, told Catholic News Service...

Holy Land tour heightens U.S. Bishops’ awareness of complexities of region (CNS) U.S. bishops visiting the Holy Land said an on-the-ground tour and briefing about the situation in East Jerusalem heightened their awareness of the settlement issue in the divided city. “The expansion of settlements is quickly driving (the possibility of a two-state solution) off the drawing board,” said Bishop Richard E. Pates of Des Moines, Iowa, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace. “The continuing expansion of the Jewish communities and its implication for a two-state solution has been a concern of the National Interreligious Leadership Initiative for Peace in the Middle East...”

Gaza children return to school (Al Jazeera) At least half a million children returned to their schools in the Gaza strip on Sunday, where many will be given special attention and pyschological counselling before their regular classes begin. This initiative aims to help children deal with the traumas the war has inflicted on them. There has been several weeks of delay due to the damage of more than 250 schools and the use of about 90 UN educational facilities as shelters for tens of thousands of internally displaced Palestinians, the United Nations and local authorities said...

Law would permit Christian women to inherit property of deceased children (The Times of India) The Narendra Modi government is readying an amendment in the Indian Succession Act of 1925 that will allow Christian women to get rights in the property of their deceased children. As per Sections 41 to 48 of Indian Succession Act, 1925, governing Christians, it gives mothers no right to inherit property of deceased children who have not left behind any will. All such properties are to be inherited by the father. If the father is not alive, the properties go to the siblings...

Catholics and Orthodox to meet in Amman (VIS) The eighth plenary session of the International Joint Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church will take place in Amman, Jordan from 15 to 23 September, following the invitation from the Greek-Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, His Beatitude Theophilos III...



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12 September 2014
Greg Kandra




Two Christian women from Qaraqosh, Iraq, who were forced to flee advancing Islamic State militants in Mosul, wait in front of tents outside St. Joseph Shrine near Erbil, Iraq, 10 September. Sister Marie Claude Naddaf, provincial leader of Lebanon and Syria f or the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, is still shaken by what she witnessed visiting Irbil. (photo: CNS/Mohamed Messara, EPA)

A sister who took part in our staff’s recent visit to Iraq offers her powerful, first-hand account of what she saw, in an interview with CNS:

Sister Marie Claude Naddaf, provincial leader of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd for Lebanon and Syria, is still shaken by what she witnessed visiting Erbil, Iraq.

Representing the Union of the Superior Generals of women religious in Lebanon, Sister Marie Claude accompanied Catholic Near East Welfare Association on its 2-5 September mission to the capital of the Kurdish region in Iraq.

More than 100,000 Christians and other minorities sought refuge in the region following attacks by Islamic State militants. Many were given less than half an hour to flee their houses.

“I saw with my eyes, listened with my ears, met them (refugees) and received them in my heart,” Sister Marie Claude told Catholic News Service. “I was not at all expecting to see that much misery, poverty and sadness in the eyes of the refugees.”

“For me, it’s very difficult to find the words to describe this tragedy, people who were uprooted from their civilization, their culture, their land. They were pulled out like weeds — expulsed, exiled and taken away. Will the world even try to understand and feel what these people are feeling?”

Sister Marie Claude lived through Lebanon’s 1975-90 war, the current war in Syria, and has served Iraqi refugees who fled to Syria after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.

“But never before have I witnessed anything like this, people living on the streets, when before they were living comfortably with dignity in their homes,” she said. “It pierced my heart like a knife.”

Most of the displaced adults are educated professionals — doctors, engineers, architects, government workers, teachers and university professors — who were providing services to the Iraqi people.

Now their future is uncertain.

Sister Marie Claude likened their plight to that of the first Christians living in the catacombs, exposed to the elements and all kinds of dangers.

A recipient of the “International Woman of Courage” award from the U.S State Department in 2010 for her work with abused, neglected and trafficked women, Sister Marie Claude has continued to be one of the Middle East region’s most effective champions for at-risk women.

“There are all these political strategies and policies concerning women’s rights and violence against women, yet women are left exposed on roads and sidewalks of Irbil, exposed to all kinds of violence and dangers, and nobody is doing anything to raise a voice for them,” Sister Marie Claude said. “The world is able to see, but it seems it doesn’t want to look at them.”

During her visit, she heard about a pregnant woman who was living in a tent with about 20 other people when she went into labor. The woman delivered her baby without any medical assistance.

“There was not even anything to cover the newborn baby with, except a shirt off of somebody’s back.”

The next day the baby was very sick, so the mother walked with her baby to the dispensary tent. Because there was a team of about 15 doctors, all exiles from Qaraqosh volunteering their time, the baby’s life was saved. But the baby’s face was severely burned from exposure to the sun during the walk.

“I want to send a plea to the world. This is enough. It cannot continue,” Sister Marie Claude said.

She questioned a policy of ordering airstrikes against the Islamic State.

“The U.S. minister of defense is saying that each airstrike would cost $8 million,” she said.

Instead, she said, the international community should work toward liberating the villages that were taken over by Islamic State militants and, through the United Nations, create a protected zone.

The objective of such raids, Sister Marie Claude said, is “just to protect their own interests, especially the areas rich in oil.”

Yet the church, she said, is a shining witness amid the misery.

Among the displaced are two bishops, priests and more than 100 sisters who are living among the people, helping them and sharing in their sorrows, she said.

To help all who are suffering in Iraq, please visit our giving page. And remember to keep them — and all those caring for them — in your prayers.



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12 September 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2013, Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, prefect of the Congregation for the Eastern Churches, arrives for a prayer service in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, prefect of the Congregation for the Eastern Churches, addressed the Permanent Council of the United States Episcopal Conference in Washington D.C. on Tuesday 9 September. He described the many challenges facing the Church — and expressed his appreciation for all the pastoral and charitable work being undertaken in the region:

The prelate declared that after his trips to Syria in January 2011 and Iraq in December 2012, he “never would have imagined that we would find ourselves in the present situation.” He added: “Still in the 21st century, as if history has taught nothing, we must witness barbarities and atrocities which strike above all the weakest: the elderly, women and children. Along with my preoccupations for the thousands of refugees...I have ever in mind the bishops and priests still in the hands of kidnappers in Syria, and I cannot forget the journalists so brutally killed.”

Cardinal Sandri remarked that, “On the one hand, the action of the Holy Spirit continues to make the Church fertile in every part of the world, manifesting its characteristic maternity. Yet, on the other hand, it must be recognised that the Churches, which gave rise in great part to the diffusion of the Gospel in the Apostolic era, are now shaken at their foundations and threatened in their very existence.” He also referred to the difficulties experienced by the Church in Jerusalem, reiterating his conviction that “a durable peace in the Holy Land would contribute significantly to the stability of the whole Middle East,” also highlighting “the drama of the Church in Antioch.” He emphasised, “If these Churches, the historic mothers of the evangelising mission, are struck at their foundations, we, as their children, cannot be silent. ... God chose that part of the world as ‘the cradle of a universal plan of salvation in love,’,” adding that “for nearly 2,000 years these Christians have kept alive the flame of the first Pentecost in those lands.”

Cardinal Sandri repeated the words of Pope Francis to the members of the Oriental Congregation at the end of their Plenary Session last November: “Every Catholic owes a debt of thanks to the Churches that live in that region. From these Churches we may learn, among other things, the effort of the daily exercise of the spirit of ecumenism and of interreligious dialogue. The geographical, historical and cultural context in which they have lived for centuries has indeed made them natural interlocutors with numerous other Christian confessions and with other religions.”

He thanked the American Episcopal Conference for the “constant and generous attention” shown to the Oriental Churches, especially in relation to efforts to raise the awareness of the political authorities. He also thanked the Catholic Near East Welfare Association (CNEWA) for the work of the Pontifical Mission for Palestine, as well as Aid to the Church in Need and Catholic Relief Services, and highlighted the “great hospitality the United States has given over the decades to all of the Eastern Churches in the diaspora.”

Read the full report.



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