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Winter, 2013
Volume 39, Number 4
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In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
21 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A resident of a home for girls hugs a sister from the Verbo Encarnado (Incarnate Word) community, which runs the child care facility near Alexandria, Egypt.
(photo: Mohammed El-Dakhakhny)


In the November 2004 edition of ONE, we featured a story about the work of the Verbo Encarnado sisters in the Dekhela neighborhood of Alexandria, Egypt. The sisters established homes for girls escaping turbulent and unstable homes for the comfort and security offered by the congregation:

The national average daily income is just over $10 a day. About 23 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. Due to overpopulation, a weak economy and high unemployment, the challenges facing Egypt’s youth are daunting.

Sister María Guadalupe, the superior of the community in Egypt, says the situation in Dekhela is especially bad. The town is poor; there are few social services.

“These girls were living with their families in one room,” she says. “No bathroom, no kitchen, just one room. Sometimes there would be a bed and that’s all. So the girls were spending all their time in the street.”

For more, read Building a Brighter Future.



Tags: Egypt Middle East Sisters Africa
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20 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A resident of the Divine House in Zahle, Lebanon, takes a break from playtime.
(photo: Gabriel Delmonaco)


CNEWA has been helping children in Lebanon for many years, primarily through our needy child sponsorship program. During his pastoral visit to Lebanon last winter, Msgr. John Kozar met some children who have benefited from CNEWA’s support at the Blessed Sacrament Orphanage:

We were warmly greeted by the present superior, Mother Francoise Doueihy, and a number of the other sisters. As we tried to meet everyone present, the grand entrance into the hall filled with singing, smiling and happy girls between the ages of 5 and 16. They welcomed us with some songs and dances, dressed patriotically in the colors of Lebanon: red, white and green, especially green, representing the famous cedars of Lebanon.

What a loving and lovable group of young ladies. I shared with them that the children of North America sent them their love and their prayers and they offered the same to all of our children back home. We had some real fun taking photos with all of them. Their radiant faces truly expressed the presence of Jesus on their faces and in their hearts. What a wonderful visit.

Interested in sponsoring a child? Visit our website for more information.



Tags: Lebanon Children Education Orphans/Orphanages
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3 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A family prepares muttsmala for the Malabar Food Festival in Ernakulam, Kerala.
(photo: Peter Lemieux)


There is a vast array of cuisines unique to the cultures and regions of the world CNEWA serves. Below are five delicious recipes:

  1. Sambar. Sambar is a vegetable soup made with tamarind and pigeon peas. It is one of the most popular dishes in South India, accompanying most meals. Enjoy it over white rice, idli (steamed rice cake) or dosa (pancake made with black gram and rice). We featured the recipe for this South Indian favorite in the November 2008 issue of ONE.

  2. Dosa. Dosa, as mentioned above, is a pancake made with black gram and rice. It can be enjoyed with any number of the flavorful stews, sauces or soups in Indian cuisine. You can find the recipe for dosa in the November 2008 issue of ONE as well.

  3. Tisza Fisherman’s Soup. Tisza Fisherman’s Soup, originating in Hungary, is a paprika-based river fish soup, best served hot and spicy. The original fisherman’s soup is prepared with fish from the Danube and Tisza rivers. The recipe for Tisza Fisherman’s Soup can be found in the September 2005 issue of ONE.

  4. Sfeeha (Meat Pies). Sfeeha, or meat pies, can be found in various parts of the Middle East and Armenia. Sfeeha are a pizza-like dish filled with a combination of spices, vegetables and either beef or lamb. The recipe for Sfeeha was featured in the July 2006 issue of ONE.

  5. Injera. Injera, a spongy flatbread made from teff, is the Ethiopian staple bread. It is used to scoop up meat and vegetable stews. It also lines the trays on which the stews are served and soaks up the juices from the meal. A meal is complete only after the last injera is eaten. The recipe for injera can take a few days preparation.

Respond in the comments and let us know if you try any of these tasty recipes!



Tags: India Middle East Ethiopia Eastern Europe Cuisine
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3 August 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 2000, Armenian Catholics pray during the Divine Liturgy.
(photo: Armineh Johannes)


In keeping with our mission to educate people in the West about their brothers and sisters in the East, ONE magazine has featured an article profiling one of the many churches of the East in each edition since 2005. In the September 2008 issue, we profiled the Armenian Catholic Church:

Armenia’s Christian roots run deep. According to tradition, the apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus first evangelized the kingdom, then a buffer state between the rival empires of the Persians and Romans. After years of persecution, Christianity took hold when Gregory, the “illuminator of the Armenians,” baptized King Tiridates III in 301. The king proclaimed Christianity the official religion of the state, making Armenia the first Christian nation.

Looking both east and west, the Armenian Church digested the philosophical positions and theological vocabularies of the great learning centers of the ancient world — Alexandria and Antioch, Athens and Rome, Constantinople and Seleucia, Edessa and Nisibis — and began the development of an alphabet for the Armenian vernacular even as an independent Armenian nation expired.

Though conscious of the great Christological controversies that rocked the universal church, the Armenians could not participate in these debates, especially the Council of Chalcedon (451). Appeasing Persian oppression, the leaders of the Armenian Church declared their civil allegiance to the Persian emperor, but stressed their spiritual submission to Christ.

To learn more, read our profile of the Armenian Catholic Church in the September 2008 issue of ONE.



Tags: Armenia Prayers/Hymns/Saints Armenian Catholic Church
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1 August 2012
Michael J.L. La Civita




Fleeing violence, Syrian refugees make their way to the Jordanian city of Mafraq, 31 July.
(photo: CNS/Muhammad Hamed, Reuters)


CNEWA’s regional director for Lebanon and Syria, Issam Bishara, reports on efforts to supply emergency aid to families and children displaced by the civil war raging within Syria, especially in Homs and Al Qusayr.

With funds raised throughout North America and Europe, CNEWA is coordinating its efforts with partners on the ground, including the Melkite Greek Catholic and Greek Orthodox patriarchates in Damascus, the Good Shepherd sisters in Damascus and a Melkite Greek Catholic parish in Qaa, a village on the Lebanese-Syrian border.

To read the full report, click here. To learn how you can support CNEWA’s relief efforts in Syria, click here.



Tags: Syria Refugees Relief CNEWA Pontifical Mission Issam Bishara
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1 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A Coptic priest celebrates the liturgy at a church in Deir Azra, a Christian village in Upper Egypt. (photo: Holly Pickett)

Last week, Trudy Rubin, a columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, reported on the reactions within Egypt’s Coptic community to the election of Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Morsi as president:

There were simmering tensions between radical Muslims and the Coptic community under the Mubarak regime, including attacks on the Copts' places of worship. To open new churches, Copts were required to get presidential permission, which was rarely forthcoming, forcing them to worship in “unlicensed,” and thus vulnerable, structures.

“We thought the revolution would solve our grievances,” Sidhom said, ruefully. “It took a lot of people by surprise that Islamists were able to take advantage of the revolution.”

Under Hosni Mubarak, she said, despite the problems, ultraconservative Salafi Muslims had no power. Now, young Salafis return from the cities to their home villages, where Copts and Muslims have lived side by side, and warn them against Christian “infidels.” She reeled off a list of churches that have been burned down since the revolution.

For more from this story, read Copts in Egypt are watching and worrying.



Tags: Egypt Village life Coptic Christians Coptic Church
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26 July 2012
Erin Edwards




Syrian refugees walk outside tents at a refugee camp in the Turkish border town of Boynuegin on 24 March. (photo: CNS/Osman Orsal, Reuters)

The violence in Syria escalates by the day and more and more Syrians are seeking refuge in neighboring countries, such as Turkey. Though Turkey has continued sheltering thousands of Syrians who have fled the conflict, officials are concerned that any increase in refugees will put a significant strain on their efforts:

In the Syria crisis, Ankara has hinted it might act to head off any vast influx of refugees, but has not spelled out what it would do, beyond seeking U.N. Security Council approval or at least support from its NATO allies for any such intervention.

Turkey toughened its military rules of engagement on the frontier after Syria shot down a Turkish jet in disputed circumstances last month, but has not retaliated directly.

“A buffer zone, humanitarian corridors, a safe haven are all vague concepts which will require international resolutions,” said one Turkish official, who asked not to be named.

“Definitely an aggression from Syria might be a turning point, or a massive influx of refugees,” he said. “The other scenario is the total collapse of the regime in Syria. We will reconsider our measures along the borders and protect them.”

For the moment, Turkish leaders seem wary, but more focused on coping better with the refugees they already host.

For more from this story, read Syria Conflict: Turkey Refugee Camps Struggle To Cope With 44,000 Syrians. If you would like to contribute to our Syria emergency fund, please visit our website.



Tags: Syria Refugees Turkey Refugee Camps
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24 July 2012
Erin Edwards




Students play at St. Charles School in Achrafieh located in east Beirut. (photo: Sarah Hunter)

In the July 2008 issue of ONE, we featured a story about the resiliency and openness of Catholic schools in Lebanon following the civil war in 2006:

Catholic schools can be found throughout Lebanon, in areas where there is little religious diversity or towns where Christians and Muslims live in segregated areas. In such places, the boundaries separating public school districts frequently coincide with community boundaries — thus reinforcing sectarianism.

Catholic schools, meanwhile, enroll students from all communities, whether adjacent, distant, Christian or Muslim. In many parts of Lebanon, they represent the last forum where Christian and Muslim youth meet and grow up knowing one another.

“Catholic schools are natural places where children can come together, sit next to each other and get to know the other person slowly but surely,” said Maronite Father Marwan Tabet, who heads Lebanon’s General Secretariat of Catholic Schools.

“It’s not like you have to shove it down the throats of people — and the kids grow to know each other, to love each other, to accept each other. That’s very important.”

For more, read Pillars of Lebanon.



Tags: Lebanon Children Middle East Education Catholic Schools
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24 July 2012
Greg Kandra




If you’re new to us and find yourself wondering, “Just what is CNEWA?,” this four minute journey into our world offers some inspiring answers. This video features a look at some of the people and places we serve, along with a conversation with Msgr. John E. Kozar, CNEWA’s president. Curious for more? You’ll find an extensive history of the agency and information about how you can be a part of the work we do over at the CNEWA website.

Who is CNEWA? from CNEWA on Vimeo.



Tags: India CNEWA Middle East Eastern Europe Northeast Africa
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20 July 2012
Erin Edwards




In this image from 2006, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip attend prayers during the Islamic festival of Eid al-Fitr at the conclusion of Ramadan. (photo: CNS/Mohammed Salem, Reuters)

Today begins the official observance of Ramadan, the most important event of the year for Muslims — but what does that mean? Last year, Elias Mallon, CNEWA’s education and interreligious affairs officer, wrote an award-winning essay in ONE about Ramadan. Below, we have highlighted five interesting facts from his essay:

  1. The date when Ramadan begins is not set in stone.
    “The exact beginning of Ramadan depends on this sighting of the new moon, which occurs anytime within a two–day period. As a result it is never absolutely certain in any given year when Ramadan officially begins.

    “Similarly, because the Muslim year is lunar, i.e., calculated by the moon, it is about 11 days shorter than the solar calendar, which is familiar to most people. As a result, every year Ramadan is about 11 days “earlier” than the year before.”

  2. The United States Postal Service has issued several stamps related to Ramadan since 2001.
    “Ramadan and Eid ul Fitr, the feast ending it, have become increasingly visible in Europe and North America in the past two decades. Immigration has increased the number of Muslims in the West and more and more people are becoming aware of the monthlong fast and celebration.

    “In places where Muslims represent a religious minority, recognition of Ramadan and Eid ul Fitr increasingly symbolizes a degree of social acceptance by the majority. In the United States, for instance, the postal service [has] issued [several] postage stamp[s] [across several years] for Eid ul Fitr. And more and more often, shops sell greeting cards for the holiday, and many non–Muslims now send or give them to their Muslim friends and neighbors.”

  3. While Ramadan has similarities to the Christian fasting season of Lent, it also has distinct differences.
    “More important, unlike Lent, Ramadan is not generally understood as an act of penance. Muslims rather consider Ramadan as an exercise in self–discipline, as purification and as a reminder of the believer’s dependence on the bounty of God…

    “One of the more striking aspects of Ramadan, particularly to Christians and Jews, is the joy with which Muslims anticipate and observe the month. Whereas Lent is a time of quiet, penitential reflection for Christians and Yom Kippur (or the Day of Atonement) is a solemn day for Jews, Ramadan is a time of spiritual and physical refreshment for Muslims. It is a time to put aside the burdens and cares of everyday life and to focus on what really matters. Whereas Christians created Fat Tuesday as the last celebration before Lent, Muslims see no need to “get it all in” before Ramadan. Ramadan is a celebration.”

  4. Can you imagine fasting — no food, no water — for over 15 hours?
    “Since the month of Ramadan moves “backward” through the solar year, it occurs at some point in every season of the year in any given location. In the summer in both northern and southern latitudes, days can be quite long and the fast can go on for more than 15 hours. If 15 hours without food is difficult, 15 hours in the summer without water is even more so.”

  5. In some communities, Ramadan helps to encourage interfaith dialogue.
    “A new and popular Ramadan tradition is for Muslims to invite their non–Muslims neighbors to take part in the iftar or Eid ul Fitr. In some communities in Europe and North America, where Muslims are a religious minority, the iftar has become an important interfaith celebration. What better way to promote interreligious understanding around the world than by sharing the joy of the iftar and Eid ul Fitr?”

Read more about the Muslim period of prayer and fasting in Ramadan Observed.



Tags: Palestine Muslim Gaza Strip/West Bank Islam Ramadan
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