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Current Issue
July, 2019
Volume 45, Number 2
  
22 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Ethiopian children gather on a rural hillside. (photo: Christian Molidor, R.S.M.)

Several years ago, we took readers to Ethiopia for a closer look at the diverse traditions of its peoples:

The peoples of Ethiopia have long experienced constant interaction through trade, warfare, religious activities, migration and intermarriage.

Although Christians and Muslims have often found themselves as antagonists in territorial disputes, the two faith communities share in many of the same observances.

Large numbers of Christians and Muslims attend an annual sacrifice at Lake Bishoftu, a fertility rite of pagan Oromo origins. Members of both faiths also participate in an annual pilgrimage to the Harege region to honor the archangel Gabriel.

Non-Christians also join Ethiopian Christians in their celebration of the Finding of the True Cross, a two-day festival known as Meskel, as well as the Christian celebration of Temqat, or the feast of the Epiphany.

No matter their religious or ethnic identities, Ethiopians also share a number of cultural traits. Belief in active spirits such as the evil eye, a ban on the consumption of pork, a ritual calendar, pilgrimages and monotheism are just some of the many beliefs and practices common to the great majority of the Amhara, Tigrinyans, Falasha, Kman, Oromo, Somali and Haddiya of every faith community.

Despite these similarities and the modernization and consolidation efforts of Ethiopian governments starting in the late 19th century, Ethiopia is not a single national society.

Sadly, poverty is probably the only characteristic common to most every Ethiopian. The country is overwhelmingly poor, with most of the population engaged in subsistence farming. Degraded lands, poor cultivation and frequent droughts have left the country periodically unable to feed its people.

Read more about the Ethiopian people in the July 2004 issue of ONE.



Tags: Ethiopia Cultural Identity Christian-Muslim relations Farming/Agriculture Ethiopian Christianity