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June, 2018
Volume 44, Number 2
  
27 March 2013
Greg Kandra




A child prays during liturgy in Santhithadam, India. (photo: Sean Sprague)

Several years ago, we paid a visit to a valley in Kerala where some enterprising families had established a small community of Christians:

Santhithadam means “Valley of Peace” in Malayalam, the language of Kerala.

Located at the end of a nearly impassable dirt road, Santhithadam is indeed a peaceful valley hidden away in one of the most remote corners of Kerala, in southwest India. While much of Kerala is overcrowded, its many people competing for limited farmland, Santhithadam is an exception.

Not far from the border with Tamil Nadu and set on the high Attapaddy plateau, the area was thinly populated by scattered tribes for centuries. Then, about 30 years ago, 76 families settled in Santhithadam from the crowded south, including 40 Syro-Malabar Catholic families from Kottayam, Kerala’s Christian heartland.

The families who settled in Santhithadam were like pioneers arriving at a new frontier. These economic migrants had given up their former lives, knowing there would be no turning back. What tiny plots of land they had owned in Kottayam were sold and replaced in Santhithadam with larger plots, ripe for development and cultivation. But at the time, many of these hard-working people did not know what they were facing.

Read more about Kerala’s Brave New Frontier in the July 2003 issue of the magazine.



Tags: India Kerala Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Indian Christians Farming/Agriculture