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Current Issue
Summer, 2014
Volume 40, Number 2
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In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
27 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III, left, speaks to other Christian leaders during a visit to Iraqi refugees in Erbil, Iraq. Seen on the right is Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter. (photo: CNS/Mychel Akl, courtesy Maronite Patriarchate)

Returning from a visit to the Kurdish region of Iraq, Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III called the Islamic State invasion “pure and simple religious cleansing and attempted genocide.”

Catholic News Service reports:

“What we, the five patriarchs, saw in Ain Kawa, Erbil and other cities of Kurdistan, was something indescribable in terms of the violation of human rights and the threat of disappearing of various communities among the vulnerable minorities of Northern Iraq,” Patriarch Ignatius Joseph said. “It is a pure and simple religious cleansing and attempted genocide.

Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Joseph and Syriac Orthodox Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II stayed in Iraq for six days after arriving as part of a delegation of Catholic and Orthodox patriarchs who visited Erbil to give moral and spiritual support to the beleaguered Iraqis from the Ninevah Plain. The displaced minorities -- Christians, Yazidis, Shiite Muslims and Shabaks -- sought refuge there from their besieged towns and villages, which fell to Islamic State militants in early August after they were evicted for their religious affiliation.

Patriarch Ignatius Joseph spoke to Catholic News Service about the flood of displaced Iraqis they encountered.

In the Kurdistan region, “we saw hundreds of families still living on the streets, exposed to an unbearable heat wave, lacking the basic needs and primarily fearing for their future,” as winter approaches, the Catholic leader said. Temperatures in the Kurdish region currently climb above 105 degrees Fahrenheit, yet winters are harsh and freezing, often with torrential rain and snow.

Patriarch Ignatius Joseph said the most-asked question by many of the Christian refugees was, “Can we ever return?”

“At that question, the most feared answer was: No answer could be given,” he said.

The patriarch said that along with the little financial assistance they could offer the displaced, the patriarchs “prayed with them, consoling, encouraging and inspiring them with Christian ‘Hope against all hope,’ repeatedly reminding them of the promise of the Lord: ‘Do not be afraid, you little flock. … I will be with you until the end of time.’ ”

Read more about the patriarchs’ visit here.



Tags: Iraq Violence against Christians Iraqi Christians Iraqi Refugees Syriac Catholic Patriarch Ignatius Joseph III Younan
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26 August 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2010, Sister Marie-Claude Naddaf arrives for the Synod of Bishops for the Middle East at the Vatican, accompanied by Msgr. Philippe Brizard, former director of the aid agency L’Oeuvre d’Orient. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

Today, we received an email from Michel Constantin, CNEWA’s regional director in Beirut, with some important news on the work being undertaken to support our suffering brothers and sisters in Iraq.

Michel notes he will be visiting Iraqi Kurdistan in early September — to coordinate better our activities to expedite relief — and he’ll have some company:

The Union of the Superior Generals of women religious in Lebanon decided to participate in this visit, to show solidarity with other congregations and sisters working in Iraq. Sister Marie Claude Naddaf (superior general of the Good Shepherd Sisters) will represent the union and accompany CNEWA in this visit.

The president of the union, Sister Judith Haroun, has asked all member congregations to contribute financially and to collect funds to help the following congregations at work in Iraq:

  • The Dominican Sisters of Saint Catherine of Siena

  • The Chaldean Sisters of Mary

  • The Sacred Heart Sisters

  • The Syrian Catholic Ephremite Sisters

  • The Franciscan Sisters

Michel also noted that CNEWA will be coordinating its work with Sister Marie Claude to make sure funds will be distributed where they can do the most good and have the greatest impact.

At a time when so many in Iraq are feeling desperate, overwhelmed and forgotten, this visit from Sister Marie Claude and others can be a powerful and consoling witness — and, God willing, a beacon of hope. CNEWA is proud to be able to lend our support and to stand alongside these sisters and so many others who are bringing the love of Christ to those who today are so desperately in need.

Won’t you join us? To help Iraqi Christians under seige, just visit this page — and you will stand with us as we stand with them.



Tags: Iraq Sisters Iraqi Christians Iraqi Refugees Relief
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26 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko, his wife Maryna and son Mykhailo, light candles on 23 August as they attend a service in Kiev’s Hagia Sofia Cathedral after a ceremony commemorating Ukrainian Independence Day. Pope Francis also prayed for peace in Ukraine on 24 August during his weekly Angelus prayer in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican. (photo: CNS/Mikhail Palinchak, pool via EPA)



Tags: Ukraine
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25 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Protesters in Stuttgart, Germany, rally during a demonstration on 23 August initiated by the Syrian Orthodox Church in solidarity with religious minorities threatened in northern Iraq and throughout the Middle East. To support Christians under siege in Iraq, visit our special giving page. (photo: CNS/Inga Kjer, EPA)



Tags: Iraqi Christians War Iraqi Refugees Germany
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22 August 2014
Greg Kandra




People displaced by violence sit outside St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Ain Kawa, Iraq, on 14 August. (photo: CNS/courtesy Aid to the Church in Need-USA)

A glimpse at the life of Iraqis on the run, from CNS:

A group of 11 sick, disabled and elderly Iraqi Christians — including an 80-year-old woman with breast cancer — defied terrorists who ordered them to convert to Islam or be beheaded, saying they preferred death to giving up their faith.

The united resistance prompted the Islamic State extremists to drop their demands and order the Christians to immediately leave their village of Karamless after first robbing them of their possessions, according to one of the survivors.

Sahar Mansour, a refugee from Mosul, told Catholic News Service in an 18 August email that the group turned up at Ain Kawa refugee camp, where she is living, after they were released by the Islamist fighters. They had remained behind in Karamless because they were too weak to flee when the town was overrun by Islamic State militants.

Mansour said she met the 80-year-old woman with cancer, who gave her name as Ghazala, in Ain Kawa on 18 August and heard her account of their escape.

“When the people of Karamless fled from the village they [the elderly] were alone,” Mansour said. “She [Ghazala] told me when they woke up in [the] morning they were surprised when they saw nobody in the village.”

Instead they were “afraid and terrified,” she continued, when they met masked fighters from the Islamic State, who ordered them to go home and remain indoors.

Mansour said Ghazala told her that on 16 August, the terrorists assembled the group “and told them either to convert or to be killed by sword.”

“Ghazala told me that all the people told the terrorists that ’we prefer to be killed rather than convert,’ ” Mansour said. She said Ghazala added that members of the group scolded the terrorists for ignoring Islamic sacred texts that forbade forced conversions of non-Muslims.

Mansour said the elderly told the militants that the Islamic State had nothing to gain from the conversion of a group of sick, disabled and elderly people.

“When ISIS heard that they told the people to leave Karamless immediately, without taking anything, to leave with only with the clothes they were wearing,” she said.

Read more.

Please keep those Iraqis in flight in your prayers. And to help those in need, visit our giving page for Iraqi Christians under siege.



Tags: Iraq Violence against Christians Iraqi Christians Iraqi Refugees Relief
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21 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Jerry and her friends in an Ethiopian refugee camp prepare for a dance recital.
(photo: Petterik Wiggers/Panos Pictures)


In a web exclusive for the Summer edition of ONE, we get a rare glimpse inside refugee camp run by Jesuits in Ethiopia:

Elsa was lying down, exhausted. Her daughter was working on the dough for ambasha, a local variety of Ethiopian bread. The hut contained little — just a few cooking materials and two beds made of mud attached to the mud floor.

Though tired from her rigorous daily routine — which includes collecting firewood every day for cooking in an ongoing struggle to keep her three daughters fed — Elsa warmly welcomed us, insisting on offering us coffee.

As we talked over our coffee, we were surprised at her optimism...

Elsa’s face brightened as she told us about [her daughter] Jerry’s performance at a program for music and the performing arts at the camp. From an early age, Elsa told us, Jerry had proven to be a talented dancer and performer.

Now in her mid-30’s, Elsa explains that she herself had a great passion for music and dance when she was young, and is delighted to see her daughter share that passion. This was one of the reasons behind Elsa’s determination to hang on to life — Jesuit Refugee Service [J.R.S.] has helped her keep her hopes alive.

Jerry is one of the many young people living in the Mai-Aini Refugee Camp taking classes at the J.R.S. program for music and the performing arts. Besides music, J.R.S. is also engaged in providing five other types of psychosocial support for children. These programs, which benefit not only the children, but the extended families living in the camp, include counseling, sports and recreational activities, theater and library services.

Read more of this web exclusive in our virtual online edition of the magazine. And to learn how you can support the work CNEWA is doing with J.R.S. in Ethiopia, visit our giving page.



Tags: Ethiopia Refugee Camps ONE magazine
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21 August 2014
Greg Kandra




As we announced earlier in the week, the new edition focuses on the needs of the marginalized, with some inspiring stories from the world CNEWA serves.

Check out our virtual print edition and discover the rich reporting and beautiful photography that have become hallmarks of our award-winning magazine.

Msgr. John Kozar, CNEWA’s president, offers a preview below.



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20 August 2014
Greg Kandra




This image, “Rejoice, Mother Church,” is taken from “The Illuminated Easter Proclamation.” It is one of several original works going on sale this week to support the ongoing mission
of CNEWA in Iraq. (photo: courtesy Deacon Charles Rohrbacher)


A couple days ago, I got an email from Deacon Charles Rohrbacher in the Diocese of Juneau (Alaska), who wanted me to know about a fundraiser they are undertaking to help Christians in Iraq — and, specifically, to support the work of CNEWA.

Charles is a gifted artist who has created some magnificent icons (such as the one above). Now many of his most beautiful works are about to be sold, with all money going to benefit persecuted minorities in the Middle East. I was curious to know more, so he answered a few questions by email yesterday.

Q: Tell us about this unusual fundraising idea.
A:This coming Friday at the parish hall of the cathedral in Juneau, Alaska, we are having a fundraiser we are calling “Icons for Iraq” to support the relief work of CNEWA and CRS on behalf of Christians and other persecuted minorities in northern Iraq.

We are having an exhibit for the community this coming Friday from 4:30-7:00pm (AST) at the parish hall, displaying the original art from two books that I recently illustrated for Liturgical Press, “The Illuminated Easter Proclamation (Exsultet)” and the “The Passions of Holy Week” (which in June was honored by the Catholic Press Association.)

Parishioners and community members are invited to come by to see the artwork and have something to eat and drink. Everyone is encouraged to make a donation to CRS and/or CNEWA. In addition, all of the art on exhibit will be available for a donation — we have set a minimum donation for each of the matted and framed icon illustrations (although we’d be delighted if donors wished to contribute more.)

Q: Where did the idea come from?
A: I got the idea as I was praying last week for Iraqi Christians. I was pondering what I might have to offer that could be of help to the Christians in Iraq who are in such dire need and it occurred to me that donating this artwork might be a way to help out.

I continued to pray about doing this, talked it over with some of my colleagues in ministry and then asked for the blessing of my bishop, Edward J. Burns, which he enthusiastically gave, along with the sponsorship of the Diocese of Juneau for the event.

Q: Have you or the diocese ever done anything like this before?
A: Our diocese is small here but our people are quite generous and creative raising funds for the work of the Church here and abroad. But I think this is the first time that I can recall that we’ve done something like this with icons.

Q: Tell us a little about your own background as an icon writer and deacon.
A: I just marked my seventh anniversary as a deacon and I regard creating icons as a part of my diaconal ministry. I’ve been doing this for the past 34 years. I’m grateful that I was able to study first with a Russian Orthodox iconographer and then with Fr. Egon Sendler SJ, a Byzantine Catholic iconographer in France. In Alaska and in other parts of the country, I’ve been fortunate to have painted (or written) icons for Orthodox, Eastern andRoman Catholic parishes. I’ve also done painted illustrations for Liturgical Press and Oregon Catholic Press.

What attracted me to the icon so many years ago was my discovery that the icon was, in the tradition of the undivided Church, a participation in the proclamation of the Word of God. The defense of the icon at the Second Council of Nicaea in 787 was the last place of formal agreement between the Eastern and Western Churches. This suggested to me that the icon might be an occasion for unity between Christians, reaching across the various divisions and misunderstandings that separate us.

Q: How can people bid on this art?
A: The main event is on Friday, 22 August here in Juneau. But anyone interested in making an early donation to obtain a specific icon should contact me by noon Thursday, via email: charlesr@gci.net. The work being made available can be seen at the Facebook page of my studio, The New Jerusalem Workshop.

All requests from outside of Juneau will need to pay via credit card. All items that need to be shipped will have an additional 15% charge to cover postage and shipping.

To learn more, visit the “Icons for Iraq” page at the Diocese of Juneau website.



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20 August 2014
Greg Kandra




Villagers gather for a candlelit satsang outside a house in a small village in Bhikkawala.
(photo: John Mathew)


The Summer edition of ONE is now online, and one of the stories focuses on the plight of the Dalits — or so-called “untouchables” in India — who, despite obstacles and difficulties, convert to Christianity:

A Sanskrit term, Dalit denotes the former “untouchable” groups in India’s multilayered caste system that segregates people on the basis of their birth. According to the 2011 national census, one in six Indians belong to this caste; in Uttar Pradesh, now home to Mahinder Singh, some 20 percent of the state’s nearly 200 million people belong to this group. And though Mahatma Gandhi called the Dalits “harijan” (children of God) and the Indian constitution bans caste discrimination, those once identified as such continue to lag behind, socially and economically.

The Indian government recognizes and protects Dalits, but Mr. Singh cannot claim any benefits; his community, Rai Sikh, is not listed as a scheduled caste in Uttar Pradesh. Nor may Mr. Singh appeal this status, as the special concessions for those of low-caste origin are restricted only to Dalits who identify as Hindus, Buddhists or Sikhs.

Mr. Singh accepted baptism as a Christian 12 years ago.

“I have wandered all my life for happiness and finally found peace in the Lord,” he says, standing tall and wiry despite a slight stoop.

Dalit Christians and Muslims are excluded from any concessions under the pretext that Christianity and Islam do not recognize the caste system. For the past 65 years, churches have been fighting to redress this injustice, saying it violates the Indian constitution’s prohibition of discrimination based on religion, caste or gender.

But Mr. Singh is not alone. He belongs to a community of hundreds of Syro-Malabar Dalits united within the Syro-Malabar Catholic Eparchy of Bijnor, which includes Uttarakhand state and the Bijnor district of Uttar Pradesh.

He and his wife, Preetam Kaur, live in a small village in an area known as Gangapar, a few miles from the eparchy’s newest parish, St. Alphonsa, founded in July 2013. Theirs is a story of both purpose and perseverance. Despite tremendous obstacles, the parish community has managed to thrive, buoyed by a fervent and unshakable faith.

Read more about the Dalits in the Summer edition of ONE.



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20 August 2014
Greg Kandra




An elderly Iraqi woman fleeing violence gestures at the Al Waleed refugee camp in Iraq
on 19 August. (photo: CNS/Morris Bernard, UNHCR handout via EPA)


U.S. Dominicans praying for Iraqi Dominicans, villagers (CNS) Dominican Sister Attracta Kelly in Adrian, Michigan, has been able to speak a few times with the superior of a group of Iraqi Dominicans and knows how desperate their situation is since they escaped Islamicists in northern Iraq. Sister Maria Hanna, the superior, and 51 other Dominican sisters, along with their family members and other villagers were driven from the Ninevah Plain by Islamic State fighters. “The problem is they have nothing,” Sister Kelly said of the group, which fled to the northern Kurdish city of Irbil. “They are sleeping in the streets, sleeping under trees. There is a church (where) they have been sleeping on pews, on the floor, outside in the yard, and they have no shelter. They are having a time getting food, and they want to leave the country...”

Pope thanks people for prayers (CNS) Pope Francis, in mourning for the deaths of his nephew’s wife and two small children, thanked people at his weekly general audience 20 August for their prayers. After each of the priests who translate the pope’s words offered him condolences for the tragedy that struck his family, Pope Francis explained to the people: “The pope has a family, too. We were five siblings, and I have 16 nieces and nephews. One of these nephews was in an accident. His wife died along with his two small children — one who was 2 years old and the other several months...”

Strike in Gaza hits family of Hamas military commander (The New York Times) Israeli airstrikes killed a wife and baby son of the top military commander of Hamas, the Islamist movement that dominates the Gaza Strip, hours after rocket fire from Gaza broke a temporary cease-fire Tuesday and halted talks aimed at ending the six-week conflict collapsed in Cairo. The fate of the commander, Mohammed Deif, the target of several previous Israeli assassination attempts, remained unclear, though Palestinian officials and witnesses said his was not one of three bodies pulled Wednesday from the rubble of the bombed Gaza City home...

Maronite patriarch prepared to meet with leader of Hezbollah to discuss ISIS (Fides) The Patriarch of Antioch of the Maronites Bechara Boutros Rai said he was ready to meet soon the leader of Hezbollah, Sayyed Hasan Nasrallah, in order to address together growing concerns about the threat posed by jihadists of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) that proclaimed the Caliphate in the regions which have fallen under their control in Syria and Iraq...

In Kerala, church decides not to bury bishops in sanctuaries (New India Express) In what could be called a revolutionary decision, the Syro-Malabar Church, one of the three Catholic denominations in India, has decided not to bury bishops in the sanctuary (madbaha) of churches. The decision was taken at the Synod of the church that began at Mount St. Thomas, Kakkanad, the headquarters of the Church, on Tuesday. “From now onwards, deceased bishops and metropolitans will be laid to rest in the crypt (an underground burial place in churches) if such a facility is available, or at the chapel attached to the cemetery,” said Syro-Malabar Church spokesperson Fr. Paul Thelakkatu...



Tags: Lebanon Pope Francis Iraq Kerala Maronite
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