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September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
4 December 2014
Greg Kandra




Members of the Rifo family gather in their temporary dwelling in Sulimaniyeh, Iraqi Kurdistan.
(photo: Don Duncan)


The Autumn edition of ONE features as its cover story a dramatic glimpse into the lives of Iraqis who have fled from ISIS and settled in Kurdistan. It includes profiles of four different families, including the Rifos:

The Rifos are one of a dozen or so Chaldean families that have found shelter at the center in Sulimaniyeh. During the day, they sit in the common area, watching news on TV or discussing events back home, notably the ongoing war between ISIS and the Kurdish defense forces, known as the Peshmerga. For meals and at night, each family retires to its own room and lays out foam mattresses. There, they bed down for the night. In the Rifos’ area, there are six people, including the grandmother, sharing one room.

“The moment we crossed the checkpoint into Iraqi Kurdistan, I didn’t know if I should cry or if I should laugh,” recalls Ibtihaj Rifo of their nocturnal exodus. “The first thing I said to my family is: ‘We have become displaced people. Now we will be receiving food and aid from people. We will have to queue for the shower and the bathroom.’ ”

While this is true, the queues are shorter in Sulimaniyeh than in Erbil, the Kurdish city closest to the occupied Christian areas. For this reason, Erbil is currently the most overburdened and chaotic emergency response zone. Many families arriving to Erbil, like the Rifos, found no space to stay comfortably there and so they moved deeper into Iraqi Kurdistan, to Sulimaniyeh.

It’s been over two months since the Rifo family fled home and, like many others, they are still coming to terms with the trauma.

Continue reading their story at this link. Be sure to explore other profiles and features in the Autumn edition, as well.

And to help support families like the Rifos, please visit our giving page.



3 December 2014
Greg Kandra




People become emotional as more than 100,000 devotees fill the Chavara shrine on a hilltop at Mannanam, India, on 23 November, as Saint Kuriakose Elias Chavara was canonized at the Vatican, along with Saint Euphrasia Eluvathingal, who also was from Kerala.
(photo: CNS/Anto Akkara)


India is celebrating the canonization of two new saints:

More than 100,000 pilgrims thronged the Chavara shrine in southern Kerala state as Kuriakose Elias Chavara was canonized by Pope Francis on 23 November at the Vatican along with Euphrasia Eluvathingal, a member of the religious order founded by St. Chavara.

Thousands of people patiently waited in line for hours ahead of the live telecast of the canonization, which began at mid-afternoon local time, to pray at the tomb of St. Chavara, founder of the Carmelites of Mary Immaculate, a Syro-Malabar Catholic order.

“I wanted to celebrate this great day here,” Joseph Parayil, who had traveled more than 60 miles to be at the shrine to watch the ceremony, told Catholic News Service.

As Pope Francis pronounced the canonization of the two saints, even elderly women applauded as they watched the telecast on one of the dozen giant screens placed around the premises of the hilltop shrine.

St. Chavara lived at the shrine for 33 years until 1866.

Soon after the Vatican ceremony more than 100 priests concelebrated a Mass of thanksgiving for the pilgrims.

“Today the spirituality of India has reached the heavens. Father Chavara founded the first Indian religious congregation,” said Bishop Thomas Koorilos Chakkalapadickal of the Syro-Malankara Diocese of Tiruvalla during his homily.

Born in 1805, Chavara was ordained a priest in 1829. Two years later, he co-founded the Carmelite of Mary Immaculate, the first indigenous congregation. It now more than 3,000 professed members.

In 1866, Father Chavara also founded the Congregation of Mount Carmel, a women’s congregation with 6,500 members.

Oommen Chandy, Kerala’s chief minister and an Orthodox Christian, and Hindu ministers in his cabinet stood around St. Chavara’s tomb in front of the altar before the final blessing.

“With Father Chavara and Sister Euphrasia becoming saints, the entire Kerala society is being blessed today,” he told the pilgrims after the two-hour Mass.

Besides “setting off a spiritual renewal” among the Christians, Chandy reiterated that St. Chavara paved way for many social changes in Kerala.

By insisting that churches open “pallikoodam” (a school attached to church) to educate the low castes who were not allowed to enter schools at the time, the chief minister pointed out that “Father Chavara laid the foundation for the educational revolution of our state.”

Kerala is the most literate and educationally advanced state in India because of the work of the Catholic Church, which runs nearly half of the 15,000 private primary schools in the state. Catholics comprise less than 12 percent of Kerala’s population of 35 million.

Those attending the ceremonies were pleased by the canonizations.

“I am blessed and happy,” said Beeyar Prasad, a Hindu TV programmer. He delivered the concluding speech, describing St. Chavara’s legacy at Mannanam, during a rally concluding the celebrations that began with a rosary procession on the eve of the canonization.

“I am a lover of poetry and it is the beautiful poems and writings of Father Chavara that has made me his fan,” Prasad said.

“His writing on family life is relevant for every family whether Christian or Hindu,” he added.



1 December 2014
Greg Kandra




Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople kisses Pope Francis as they embrace during an ecumenical prayer service in the patriarchal Church of St. George in Istanbul on 29 November.
(photo: CNS/Paul Haring)




21 November 2014
Greg Kandra




A little boy and his family in Gaza live with the aftermath of last summer’s war. A story in the Autumn edition of ONE explores the impact of that war on the children, with scars that are often invisible. (photo: Shareef Sarhan)



20 November 2014
Greg Kandra




A boy looks through a hole in a tent at Syria’s Bab Al-Salam camp for displaced in Azaz, near the Turkish border, on 19 November. To help Syrian refugees fleeing war, visit this giving page.
(photo: CNS/Hosam Katan, Reuters)




19 November 2014
Greg Kandra




The virtual print edition of ONE looks exactly the same as the paper edition, but with some additional features. (photo: CNEWA)

Last year, we unveiled a new look for CNEWA’s magazine, ONE — and a new way to read it.

If you haven’t discovered it yet, check out the Autumn edition, which we posted online last week. It offers readers everything you can find in the print edition, but with a notable exception: no paper.

But that’s just the beginning.

Visit this link and you’ll find all 40 pages of the magazine reproduced exactly as they appear in the edition you receive in your mailbox, right down to the pages you can turn. But there are also added features in this version: you can enlarge the page for easy reading, and you can click on links that will take you to blog posts and video.

We think you’ll find it’s an exciting new way to experience the award-winning journalism and powerful photography that have made ONE among the most honored and admired magazines in the Catholic press. Check it out.

Meantime, for a preview of this newest edition of the magazine, click on the video below.

It’s all part of our ongoing effort to keep you closely connected to the world we serve — and the people your generosity helps us reach. We think these enhancements also make ONE, in so many ways, one of a kind. Thank you for your readership and your support!



19 November 2014
Greg Kandra




Morning sunshine fills St. Basil the Great Church in Krajné Cierno, Slovakia. (photo: Andrej Ban)

Some significant news for Eastern Catholics, from CNS:

The Vatican has lifted its ban on the ordination of married men to the priesthood in Eastern Catholic churches outside their traditional territories, including in the United States, Canada and Australia.

Cardinal Leonardo Sandri, prefect of the Congregation for the Eastern Churches, signed the decree on 14 June. It was published later online in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, the official periodical through which Vatican laws and decisions are published.

The new law says the pope concedes to Eastern Catholic bishops outside their traditional territory the faculties to “allow pastoral service of Eastern married clergy” and “to ordain Eastern married candidates” in their eparchies or dioceses, although they must inform the local Latin-rite bishop in writing “in order to have his opinion and any relevant information.”

“We are overjoyed with the lifting of the ban,” Melkite Bishop Nicholas Samra of Newton, Mass., told Catholic News Service in a 15 November email.

The Vatican decree explained that in response to the “protests” of the Latin-rite bishops in the United States, in 1890 the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples prohibited married Ruthenian priests from living in the United States. And in 1929-30, the Congregation for Eastern Churches extended the ban to all Eastern-rite priests throughout North America, South America and Australia.

The 1929 prohibition, known as Cum data fuerit, had significant repercussions for the Eastern Catholic churches in the United States. Sandri’s decree noted that soon after the law was promulgated, “an estimated 200,000 Ruthenian faithful became Orthodox.”

Ruthenian Bishop John Kudrick of Parma, Ohio, said 16 November that he sees the end to imposed celibacy for Eastern priests in the diaspora as an acknowledgement of the Eastern churches’ “obligation to maintain their integrity” and “of the right of the various churches to equal responsibility of evangelization throughout the world.”

“The world needs the church in its fullness,” he said, adding he believes the “change of policy results from the longstanding experience of married priests in the Western world, especially the Orthodox, but also Eastern Catholic.”

Read more.

To learn more about the church in North America most impacted by the ban, read our profiles of The American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church and Carpatho-Rusyan Greek Catholic Churches.



18 November 2014
Greg Kandra




Rev. Paul Karam, president of Caritas Lebanon, discusses the crisis in his homeland as
Bishop Gregory Mansour listens. (photo: CNEWA)


With much of the media’s attention focused on the still-escalating crisis in Iraq and Syria, the president of Caritas Lebanon — a longtime collaborator with CNEWA — visited our New York offices this morning to remind the world that his homeland is also suffering.

And: it’s getting worse.

Rev. Paul Karam — accompanied by Bishop Gregory Mansour of the Eparchy of St. Maron from Brooklyn — spoke to a small gathering of journalists at CNEWA’s headquarters to underscore the difficulties many in his country are facing as a result of the dramatic surge of refugees from neighboring countries.

Father Karam said an estimated 1.6 million refugees have crowded into Lebanon — many fleeing conflicts in Iraq and Syria. This has upset the demographic balance in the country, he explained; the influx, along with hundreds of thousands of foreign workers, has cost many people jobs and put stress on the country’s resources, including electricity, water and food.

It’s also sparked an escalation in crime, including sex trafficking. All of this has had a profound impact on the country’s economy.

“Host and local communities are suffering,” Father Karam explained. “The Lebanese are getting more poor.” He told of a mall that opened 18 months ago. At the time, 76 percent of the employees were Lebanese. Now, it’s down to 22 percent. Local unemployment has skyrocketed. This, in turn, is creating more challenges for Caritas and other aid organizations, as the number of needy families — both refugees and Lebanese — continues to grow.

In spite of such dire numbers, Father Karam said he remains hopeful that the international community will support Lebanon, one of the most stable and welcoming democracies in the Middle East.

Both Father Karam and Bishop Mansour emphasized the importance of maintaining Christianity in the region where it began. And they asked us to help get out the word — and encourage ongoing prayers for the Lebanese people.

“The Christian presence in the Middle East is something that’s very dynamic in Lebanon,” said Bishop Mansour. “Caritas is a symbol of Christ’s presence amid the poor.”



18 November 2014
Greg Kandra




Ultra-Orthodox Jewish women stand near the scene of an attack at a Jerusalem synagogue on 18 November. Two Palestinians are said to have killed four people with a meat cleaver and a knife in a Jerusalem synagogue on 18 November before being shot dead by police, the deadliest such incident in six years in the holy city. (photo: CNS/Finbarr O'Reilly, Reuters)



17 November 2014
Greg Kandra




Refugee children gather in a shelter for displaced Iraqis in northern Iraq. CNEWA staff members recently visited the region to assess the needs of refugees. To learn how you can help, please visit this giving page. (photo: Ra’ed Bahou)



Tags: Iraq Refugees CNEWA Children Iraqi Refugees





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