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Current Issue
September, 2017
Volume 43, Number 3
  
22 August 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Startling images from Syria, but use of chemical weapons unclear (New York Times) Scores of men, women and children were killed outside Damascus on Wednesday in an attack marked by the telltale signs of chemical weapons: row after row of corpses without visible injury; hospitals flooded with victims, gasping for breath, trembling and staring ahead languidly; images of a gray cloud bursting over a neighborhood. But even with videos, witness accounts and testimonies by emergency medics, it was impossible to say for certain how many people had been killed and what exactly had killed them. The rebels blamed the government, the government denied involvement and Russia accused the rebels of staging the attack to implicate President Bashar al Assad’s government. Images of death and chaos poured out of Syria after what may be the single deadliest attack in more than two years of civil war…

Experts say ‘little doubt’ of chemical weapon attacks in Syria (Der Spiegel) Experts are convinced that the hundreds of people who died in attacks in Syria on Wednesday were the victims of chemical weapons. It is yet to be confirmed, however, exactly what was deployed and whether the Assad regime is indeed responsible. Stefan Mogl, a chemical weapons expert with Spiez Laboratory of the Swiss Federal Office for Civil Protection, says that after viewing the videos he is left with little doubt: “The combination of symptoms indicates a nerve agent.” Such a thing would be very difficult to simulate, Mogl says. What’s more, many of the victims were children, making it even less likely the scenario could be faked. And the number of people affected by the attack also seems hard to explain by anything other than by the use of chemical weapons…

U.N. chemical weapons inspectors arrive in Syria (Al Jazeera) United Nations inspectors arrived Sunday in the Syrian capital of Damascus on a mission to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons, as Syrian officials vowed to fully cooperate with them. Their arrival comes after months of refusals by Syria’s government to let the teams into the war-ravaged country, where more than 100,000 people have been killed since fighting began in 2011. The United Nations team’s mission will be limited to investigating the alleged use of chemical weapons in three areas, in particular the 19 March attack in Khan al Assal that President Bashar al Assad blames on rebels. The other two sites have been kept secret…

Monastery near Jerusalem defaced in suspected ‘price tag’ attack (Haaretz) Police are investigating a fire bomb attack Monday night on the Beit Jamal Monastery near Jerusalem in the latest “price tag” incident, Israeli shorthand for pro-settlement hate crimes. Perpetrators threw a fire bomb into the entrance hallway and sprayed the monastery walls with the words “price tag,” “death to the Gentiles,” and “revenge.” Footage from security cameras shows fire burning for several minutes, but no vegetation or wooden furniture caught fire and it died out. The Beit Jamal Monastery is known for its good relations with Israelis, who visit to buy its ceramics…

Decade of violence threatens to uproot Iraq’s remaining Christians (Al Monitor) With the rise of internal disputes and religious extremism, Iraqi Christians are fleeing Iraq at alarming rates. This fall, Rafael Aichoa, an Iraqi Christian in his 40’s, will emigrate to Australia, joining the rest of his brothers and relatives. Aichoa realized that his connection to his ancestors’ land had completely come to an end late last year, when he discovered his parents’ mutilated bodies. Unlike Aichoa’s family, Saad Touma, a young Iraqi Christian, succeeded in escaping from his captors in the winter of 2008. Now, along with the rest of his family, Touma is preparing to leave the relatively safe Iraqi Kurdistan Region for Turkey as a prelude to permanent migration to Europe. Like thousands of other Iraqi Christians, Aichoa and Touma fear that the circle of violence in Iraq will widen to include all parts of the country. In the face of repeated targeting, nearly 700,000 Christians emigrated from Iraq, out of a total Christian population estimated at 1.4 million in 2003, according to international reports based on church records and civic organizations. Ablahad Afraim, the head of the Chaldean Democratic Union Party, believes that the number of Christians remaining in Iraq is less than 400,000…

Kidnappings, forced conversions and violence against Christians in India (Fides) Episodes of violence have troubled the Christian communities in India in recent days. Police in Chennai, in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu, are looking for the parents who attacked their 23-year-old daughter over her conversion to Christianity and her desire to become a nun. A few days before, in the state of Rajasthan, the mother of a Christian pastor was severely beaten by Hindu extremists who had threatened to kill her and cut her to pieces if she did not convert to Hinduism…



Tags: Syrian Civil War Violence against Christians Iraqi Christians Jerusalem Indian Christians