onetoone
one
Current Issue
September, 2019
Volume 45, Number 3
  
15 October 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this 2008 photo, a foreign aid volunteer helps to harvest olives in a valley east of Nablus, in the West Bank region. There were several reports of violent incidents when settlers residing in Jewish outposts overlooking the valley opposed the presence of Palestinian harvesters in the area. To learn more about life as a Palestinian olive farmer, read Olive Offerings, from the January 2009 issue of ONE. (photo: Ahikam Seri)

Palestinian olive season puts focus on Israeli settlements (Al Monitor) Members of various diplomatic missions to Palestine joined Palestinians in picking olives. The exercise was no simple picnic or act of volunteer work. Rather, it was another visible manifestation of the major problem of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict: the struggle for land. Olive trees have an important legal status. Since a large part of the West Bank is rural and often void of specific land deeds, authorities often rely on an old Ottoman ruling stating that any person who cultivates fruit-bearing trees can use this continuous relationship with the land to make claim for disputed lands. Palestinians complain that Israeli settlers cognizant of the social, legal and political importance of fruit-bearing trees have made destroying Palestinian olive trees their number one goal. Settler actions against Palestinian lands vary from cutting down olive trees, uprooting them or setting them ablaze…

Egyptians try to draft General Sisi for president (Washington Post) General Abdel Fatah al Sisi’s unofficial presidential campaign is hitting the streets with impressive momentum. Organizers claim that more than nine million people — over 10 percent of Egypt’s population — have already signed the petition calling for the man who orchestrated the July coup that overthrew Egypt’s first democratically elected leader to become this nation’s next elected president. For many Egyptians, the rise of a new military man is a comforting idea after nearly three years of political turmoil since the fall of President Hosni Mubarak. Already, Sisi mania has swept the nation in a pattern reminiscent of past strongmen — the general’s face has become ubiquitous in shop windows and even on cupcakes. He is celebrated in songs, poems and chants…

Egypt struggles for control of Sinai (Der Spiegel) The Sinai Peninsula is both a vacation paradise and a haven for jihadists and gangs of thugs. The military and the police are trying to regain control over the region. But a new class of haughty warlords and a resentful public mean the state’s chances are remote. Though the entire country has descended into violence since the military coup in July, nowhere in Egypt is the fight being waged as bitterly and violently as on the Sinai Peninsula, which is roughly the size of the Republic of Ireland…

A journey through Russia’s struggling heartland (New York Times) On the jarring, 12-hour drive from St. Petersburg to Moscow, another Russia comes into view — one where people struggle with problems that belong to past centuries…

Russia detains scores of migrants after riot (Al Jazeera) Russian police rounded up more than 1,600 immigrants in Moscow a day after rioting by nationalists over a fatal stabbing of a Russian that many residents blame on a man from the Caucasus region. Some 200 residents rallied in the Biryulyovo district on Monday to call for tougher policing of labor migrants. The riot on Sunday broke out with nationalist chants of “white power” and “Russia for Russians.” About 380 people were arrested after demonstrators smashed windows and set fire to shops…



Tags: Egypt Palestine Russia Israeli-Palestinian conflict Farming/Agriculture