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Current Issue
March, 2019
Volume 45, Number 1
  
17 October 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this April 2010 image, Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarch Gregory III celebrates the Divine Liturgy at the ancient Monastery of Mar Thomas in Sednaya, Syria. (photo: CNEWA)

Patriarch Gregory III: Christians do not need Assad to survive (BBC) Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarch Gregory III told the BBC that more than 450,000 Christians out of a total population of 1.75 million — more than one quarter — had been displaced or left the country. However, he was adamant that the Christian community will survive. Syria’s minority Christian community has faced growing violence, but he said it is not dependent for its survival on President Bashar al Assad’s secular government. In fact, Patriarch Gregory believes Christians can in fact help bring the warring sides together. “We have to have a new vision, and that is our work as Christians, especially the Christian Arabs have to play this role to change the vision…”

Scattered by war, Syrian family struggles to start over (New York Times) Watering the plants on her balcony back home in Syria this spring, Wedad Sarhan took delight in how they were stirring to life after the winter months. A rocket exploded on the balcony minutes later. Ms. Sarhan was standing inside. Two of her granddaughters were wounded. Their father, Hasan, quickly carried one girl to a nearby clinic, unaware that the other lay more grievously wounded under a pile of clothes. That evening, the Sarhans fled Dara’a, their hometown in southwestern Syria, and crossed into Jordan, three generations of refugees. Their large clan, already torn apart by the Syrian civil war, was now scattered across Jordan and Syria. “Our family story is just one of many,” said Noman Sarhan, Ms. Sarhan’s eldest son. “You can find Syrian families who have had an easier time than we’ve had, and others whose stories are more horrific. But almost all Syrian families have these in common: a relative who’s been killed or wounded, who is detained or wanted. Every family has suffered…”

The historic scale of Syria’s refugee crisis (New York Times) The Syrian refugee crisis has exploded from about 270,000 people a year ago to today’s tally of more than two million who have fled the country. The pace of the diaspora has been characterized by the United Nations as the worst since the Rwandan genocide in 1994. In addition, an estimated 4.25 million Syrians have been displaced within their country, bringing the total number forced into flight to more than six million. According to the United Nations, the flood of Syrian refugees is comparable to the crises caused by the war and sectarian violence in Iraq and by the conflicts that accompanied the breakup of Yugoslavia…

France to accept Syrian refugees amid surge in anti-immigration politics (Al Jazeera) France is set to welcome 500 Syrian refugees, reports say, at a time when what many call an anti-immigrant, far-right National Front Party is making strides in local elections and popularity polls — a sign Arab and Muslim community advocates say has grim portents for France’s immigrants. Philippe Leclerc, the French representative for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, told French newspaper Le Figaro Wednesday that President Francois Hollande agreed to accept the Syrian immigrants, after requests from the United Nations that European nations help alleviate the toll massive inflows of refugees have taken on Syria’s Middle Eastern neighbors…

Egypt detaining, deporting Syrian refugees, rights group says (Los Angeles Times) Saying that Egypt is “failing abysmally” to meet international obligations, Amnesty International called Thursday for the country’s military-backed government to stop detaining and deporting Syrian war refugees. About 300,000 Syrians have fled to Egypt, where they were once welcomed. But as their numbers have swelled, public sentiment has shifted sharply. Official media outlets routinely revile the refugees as partisans of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist movement that propelled now-deposed president Muhammad Morsi to power, and they are accused by authorities of representing a threat to public order…

Amid new attacks, Egypt’s Copts preserve heritage (Yahoo! News) Locked inside a 6th-century church in a desert monastery are some of the jewels of early Christianity — ancient murals in vivid pinks, greens and reds depicting saints, angels and the Virgin Mary with a baby Jesus, hidden for centuries under a blanket of black soot. Italian and Egyptian restorers are meticulously uncovering the paintings, some of the earliest surviving and most complete examples of early Coptic Christian art. But the work, in the final stages more than a decade after it started, is done quietly to avoid drawing attention — and there’s no plan to try to attract visitors, at least not now. “This is our heritage and we must protect it,” said Father Antonius, abbot of the Red Monastery where the Anba Bishay Church is located. He takes it as a personal mission to protect it. The church’s heavy wooden door has only two keys. He keeps one and a young monk he trusts keeps the other…

Chaldean patriarch visits Iraqi prime minister (Chaldean Patriarchate) On Wednesday afternoon, 9 October 2013, Chaldean Patriarch Louis Raphael I visited Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki to congratulate him on the occasion of Eid al Adha. Patriarch Louis Raphael discussed the plight of Christians in Iraq, outlining points to encourage them to stay in their country, which the prime minister received with interest…



Tags: Refugees Syrian Civil War Violence against Christians Chaldean Patriarch Louis Raphael I Melkite Patriarch Gregory III of Antioch