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Current Issue
March, 2018
Volume 44, Number 1
  
20 April 2018
Greg Kandra




Sister Ferdos Zora sings along with preschool students at a school for displaced Iraqi children in Iraqi Kurdistan. Read a personal account of life in exile from one of the sisters in A Letter From Iraq in the March 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Paul Jeffrey)



Tags: Iraqi Christians Sisters Iraqi Refugees

19 April 2018
Greg Kandra




Archbishop J. Michael Miller of Vancouver, British Columbia, meets with Iraqi Christian refugees on 14 April in Beirut. Refugee families, who fled Iraq in 2014 when Islamic State took over their village, are waiting to immigrate to Canada or any country that would welcome them. Archbishop Miller was part of a delegation from CNEWA visiting Lebanon this week with CNEWA’s chair, Cardinal Timothy Dolan. Read more about the trip and watch videos of it here, here and here. (photo: Carl Hetu/CNEWA)



Tags: Lebanon Refugees CNEWA Canada

18 April 2018
Greg Kandra




A group of lay people supported by the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary in Jordan gathers for one of its regular meetings in Amman. Discover how the sisters are Inspiring the Faithful in Jordan in the current edition of ONE. (photo: Nader Daoud)



Tags: Sisters Jordan

17 April 2018
CNEWA staff




Cardinal Timothy Dolan shares a joyful moment with displaced Syrian children in Lebanon. (photo: Michael J.L. LaCivita)

CNEWA’s Michael J.L. LaCivita, traveling with our contingent in Lebanon, filed these wonderful images today. He wrote:

Today, in the city of Zahle in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley — the Jerusalem of the Greek Melkite Catholic world — members of CNEWA’s board of trustees visited more Syrian families displaced by war.

Cardinal Dolan greets young children in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. (photo: Michael J.L. LaCivita)

Retired Bishop William Murphy meets young people in Lebanon. (photo: Michael J.L. LaCivita)

The bishops also met with members of the local community, whose lives have been upended by the arrival of “cheap unskilled labor,” who have taken their jobs.

But Zahle’s “pope,” Greek Melkite Archbishop Issam Darwhich, leads by example, and has reached out to Christian and Muslim refugees alike, bringing with him hundreds of volunteers to help feed, clothe and house these innocents.

Archbishop Issam Darwich mingles with his flock. (photo: Michael J.L. LaCivita)

The proof is in the pudding — as these pictures illustrate. Devout Muslim families have opened their hearts and homes to the cries of “Abuna!” (Father!) and “Sayydna! (Excellency!), Regardless of the crosses around their necks.

You can follow more of the cardinal’s trip here and here.



Tags: Lebanon CNEWA

16 April 2018
Greg Kandra




Internally displaced Syrians wait in line for food 15 April at a camp outside Damascus. The United States, France and Britain launched airstrikes 14 April against Syria, with the stated aim to punish President Bashar Assad for an alleged chemical attack against civilians. (photo: CNS/Ali Hashisho, Reuters)



Tags: Syria

13 April 2018
Greg Kandra




Bekele Haile, Tigist Zeleke, Zeritu Bulti and Fita Tulu minister to prisoners outside of Addis Ababa. Learn about the way lay ministers are bringing faith and hope to prisoners in Ethiopia in the March 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)



Tags: Ethiopia Catholic

12 April 2018
Catholic News Service




A Syrian child evacuated from Douma reacts upon arrival 11 April in Aleppo, Syria. Lebanese Cardinal Rai appealed to world leaders to stop the war in Syria and to work for comprehensive peace through diplomatic means. (photo: CNS/Aref Tammawi, EPA)

Maronite Catholic Patriarch and Lebanese Cardinal Bechara Peter appealed to world leaders to stop the war in Syria and to work for comprehensive peace through diplomatic means.

“As the great powers are beating the drums of a new war against Syria, we regret the absence of a language of peace from the mouths of senior officials in our world today,” he said, in an address 12 April directed to the international community.

In reference to the stance of world leaders toward Syria, the cardinal said, “Most tragically, their hearts are devoid of the slightest human emotion toward the millions of innocent Syrians who have been forced to flee their land under the fire of war, its crimes, destruction, terror and violence.”

“We appeal to the conscience of the great powers and the international community to work to end the war and to bring about a just, comprehensive and lasting peace through political and diplomatic means — not military,” the church leader stressed.

“The people of the Middle East are entitled to live in peace and tranquility. The declaration of war is very weak,” he said, adding that peacebuilding is the ultimate in heroism. “Among the great powers, you will remember that we all know how to start wars, but we do not know how they end.”

Noting that Lebanon has hosted more than 1.1 million refugees, or nearly half of its population, “at a time when most European countries have closed their doors,” Patriarch Bechara Peter continued: “We ask today, did these countries which are beating the drums of war bear a fraction of the hardship due to the displacement of the Syrian population?”

The patriarch’s appeal came amid threats of military retaliation against Syria over the alleged use of chemical weapons against civilians in the Ghouta region.

U S. President Donald Trump has said that “missiles will be coming.” But on the morning of 12 April, Trump tweeted, “Never said when an attack on Syria would take place. Could be very soon or not so soon at all!”

Opponents of unilateral U.S. action schedule an emergency closed-door meeting of the U.N. Security Council 12 April, and Britain also scheduled an emergency Cabinet meeting, the Associated Press reported.



Tags: Syria United States Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter Syrian Conflict

11 April 2018
Greg Kandra




Sister Noora Sabah prays with children preparing for First Communion in a church in a displaced persons camp in Ain Kawa, near Erbil. (photo: Paul Jeffrey)

In the March 2018 edition of ONE, Sister Clara Nacy, superior general for the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena, writes of life among the displaced in Iraqi Kurdistan:

During the years of displacement, our sisters worked at every camp for internally displaced persons. We led Christian catechism programs and activities. With the help of CNEWA and other organizations, we were able to distribute different items — such as clothing, mattresses, milk and diapers, etc. We felt that it is our responsibility to help our people. We ourselves were displaced, also, which helped us understand the needs of displaced families; we knew what they were going through.

Through it all, we drew strength from prayer, both individually and as a community. Believing God is always with his people, we trust he will never leave them alone, no matter what happens. We never felt abandoned, seeing the hand of God in all the organizations that have helped us care for the displaced families. People of good will were always around, showing God’s loving care. Our sisters appreciated very much this support and encouragement as we carried on our ministry…

We sisters have our own struggles, of course. We have asked different speakers to help us cope with the situation, spiritually and psychologically. We are grateful to all those who have risked their lives and have come to show solidarity and offer their knowledge.

Deep down, we believe our main help is the Risen Lord around whom we gather in every Eucharist. This unites us with the Christ and enables us to endure. Sharing with one another our difficulties gives us the opportunity to reflect and support one another. We have lost much, but we still have each other. And that is of great help.

Read more of her Letter from Iraq in the current edition of ONE.



Tags: Iraqi Christians Sisters

10 April 2018
CNEWA staff




A wounded Syrian receives aid at a hospital 7 April in Damascus after a suspected chemical weapon attack in Douma. (photo: CNS/SANA via EPA)

On Sunday, Pope Francis condemned the use of chemical weapons following reports of a deadly attack in Syria:

“There is no good and bad war, and nothing, nothing can justify the use of such instruments of extermination against defenseless people and populations,” the pope said 8 April before concluding Divine Mercy Sunday Mass in St. Peter’s Square.

A suspected chemical weapon attack occurred late 7 April when Syrian army warplanes allegedly flew over and bombed the eastern town of Douma, located 15 miles north of the Syrian capital, Damascus, according to the Reuters news agency.

The Syrian American Medical Society Foundation reported 42 victims were killed in the attack while hundreds of people, “the majority of whom are women and children, were brought to local medical centers with symptoms indicative of exposure to a chemical agent.”

Pope Francis prayed “for all the dead, for the wounded, for the families who suffer” and called for world leaders to abandon the use of war as a means of gaining peace and stability.

“We pray that political and military leaders choose the other way: that of negotiation, the only one that can lead to a peace that is not that of death and destruction,” the pope said.

We join our prayers with the Holy Father’s — holding close in our hearts the suffering people of Syria, who have endured so much for so long. We recall the words of the Rev. Nidal Abdel Massih Thomas, patriarchal vicar for northeastern Syria, who wrote in our magazine last year:

Our faith always calls for peace, but politics and bad politicians are always setting fires and disturbing the situation. I try to stay away from political discussions. My mission is to take care of my parish, to help my parishioners and to try and enrich the parish with fruitful spiritual activities.

While Syria’s many Christian communities face many and varied challenges right now, there is only one thing we all truly need: peace.

During this Easter season, a time of renewal and hope, we pray to the Prince of Peace to uplift and console the Syrian people, and bring them the peace they so urgently desire.

To learn more, and offer your prayerful support, please visit this page. Thank you and God bless you.



Tags: Syria Syrian Conflict

9 April 2018
Greg Kandra




The Rev. Jaison Koonamplakkal leads the Mary Matha Major Seminary in India. Read about The New Priests in that country — and the challenges facing the seminaries — in the March 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Meenakshi Soman)



Tags: India Priests Indian Catholics





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