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Spring, 2014
Volume 40, Number 1
imageofweek From the Archive
In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
24 April 2014
Greg Kandra




At Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Tbilisi, parishioners greet one another during the
Kiss of Peace. (photo: Molly Corso)


The spring edition of our magazine has just been posted online, and one of the stories focuses on the firm faith of Armenian Catholics, persevering and creating a sense of community in a country with only five priests:

The lack of priests on the ground means Armenian Catholics living in cities such as Borjomi, Ozurgeti and Chiatura attend Latin parishes, a phenomenon that impacts all Eastern Catholics where clergy and parishes are nonexistent. This means that a way of life, as well as a faith tradition, is imperiled. More Armenian Catholics are finding themselves disconnected from centuries of tradition without access to the sacraments and rites that have been a part of their faith and, in fact, their identity.

Yet, defying the odds, they stand firm. To spend time with Georgia’s Armenian Catholics is to rediscover the deep reservoirs of piety and purpose — and a remarkable strength of character — that have defined them for generations.

It is also to realize, above all, that the story of Georgia’s Armenian Catholics is one of unwavering faith.

“The Soviet period was a time of oppression for Armenian Catholic families,” says Tbilisi’s Rev. Mikael Khachkalian, the only Armenian Catholic priest in the city, of the challenges facing his flock in Georgia.

“The Soviet Communist regime’s deliberate policy gave birth to another problem — the Armenians of Tbilisi in particular don’t have a good command of the Armenian language, knowledge about their national Christian tradition and their rich, centuries-old history.”

Father Khachkalian estimates that around 80 percent of those worshiping in Tbilisi’s two Catholic parishes are in fact ethnic Armenians. The same problem exists around the country, outside the predominantly Armenian Catholic villages in southwestern Georgia, where the Armenian language and culture dominate. Yet even in these villages, the heart of Armenian Catholicism in the Caucasus, challenges exist. Priests must travel travel hundreds of miles in wretched conditions to provide the sacraments to far-flung congregations in shrinking communities largely empty of its men, most of whom have abandoned their families for work in Russia.

Solakat Davolian, 75, attends liturgy every morning in the small makeshift chapel in the Armenian Catholic center in Tbilisi, yet she prefers to attend Mass every Sunday afternoon at the Latin parish of Sts. Peter and Paul downtown.

Before Armenian Catholic priests arrived in Tbilisi, Armenian Catholics were served by Polish-speaking missionaries. This, Mrs. Davolian says, made participation in the life of the community a challenge. “Now that there is an Armenian priest, I come every day,” she explains. “It was hard before; we could not understand the language. Now, thank God, it is much easier.”

Read more about A Firm Faith in the Spring 2014 issue of ONE.



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23 April 2014
Greg Kandra




A restorer displays fragments of a recovered mosaic near the Jordan River (left) and a reproduction of a finished product. (photo: Christian Molidor, R.S.M.)

Several years ago, we visited the area around the Jordan where tradition holds that John baptized Jesus, and uncovered some remarkable archeological work:

Archeologist Dr. Muhammad Waheeb is the excavator of the most recently investigated major site associated with the life of Jesus. The two Gospel passages state that John the Baptist was baptizing at Bethany beyond the Jordan River, i.e., on the east side of the river, as seen from Jerusalem. This Bethany should not be confused with the home village of Mary, Martha and Lazarus on the Mount of Olives near Jerusalem.

For many centuries pilgrims have identified the location of the baptism of Jesus with a spot on the western bank of the Jordan River near Jericho. But over the past five years Dr. Waheeb has shown that for most Christians of the Byzantine period — the fourth through the seventh centuries — the activity of the Baptist was located at a site on the eastern bank known today in Arabic as Wadi el-Kharrar, about four and a half miles northeast of where the river empties into the Dead Sea.

The evidence of some pottery shards and other remains from the time of Jesus himself — what historians and archeologists call the Roman period in this region — is not yet sufficient to make an absolute identification of the site with the Gospel’s Bethany. And indeed it is difficult to “prove” archeologically the exact location of many, if not most, events of both the Old and New Testaments.

The earliest shrine-building efforts of newly free Christians, however, following the Romans’ issuing of an edict of religious tolerance in 311, as well as monastic settlements, bear witness to the attraction of particular sites to the faithful by at least the second quarter of the fourth century.

Read more about Bethany Beyond the Jordan in the January-February 2002 issue of our magazine.



Tags: Jordan
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22 April 2014
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis carries a candle as he arrives to celebrate the Easter Vigil in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican on 19 April. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)



Tags: Pope Francis Vatican Easter Rome
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17 April 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2008, early morning sunshine fills St. Basil the Great Church in Krajné Cierno in Slovakia. The region is noted for its historic wooden churches. To learn more, read Rooted in Wood from the May 2008 issue of ONE. (photo: Andrej Bán)



Tags: Cultural Identity Eastern Churches Architecture Church Slovakia
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16 April 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2000, pilgrims follow the Way of the Cross along the Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem. (photo: George Martin)

This time of year is especially busy in Jerusalem, when Passover coincides with Holy Week. Christian pilgrims in the city for Easter often follow the tradition of walking the Via Dolorosa, (or “Way of Sorrows”), the winding route through Jerusalem that is marked by the Stations of the Cross, the traditional path of Christ’s journey to Calvary.

Writer George Martin followed that journey for our magazine in 2000:

The Via Dolorosa begins in the Muslim Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem and winds its way through alleys that become progressively narrower and more crowded. Shops line the alleys, offering everything from tourist trinkets to shanks of lamb, from underwear to icons. Young boys hawk postcards; pickpockets and beggars ply their trades. Scattered between the shops are signs and bas-relief sculptures that identify the stations. At some spots one can enter chapels to pray; at others, Jesus’ passion must be commemorated on the street.

Pilgrimage groups stop to pray at a station and shops and passengers are blocked, at least partially. Those who must use the street push through: Hassidic Jews on their way to pray at the Western Wall; Muslim women carrying bundles on their heads; tourists with video cameras. The sights, the sounds and the smells are nothing like the quiet in which we pray the stations back home.

I always try to prepare the pilgrims by telling them we will follow the stations through a living city, like the Jerusalem of Jesus’ passion. Most of those living in Jerusalem at that time were neither his disciples nor his enemies; they were simply going about their lives as he was led to death. How many shopkeepers watched him pass, shook their heads at his misfortune and returned to selling their wares?

Crucifixion in ancient times was a public spectacle, a display of cruelty meant to subdue those harboring seditious thoughts. Jesus’ executioners did not have a religious event in mind. Although we meditate on some horrible scenes while praying the stations, we usually do so in the hushed surroundings of our churches, shielded from the reality of a man sentenced to death. Praying the stations in Jerusalem strips away some of that protective veil. The sacred and the profane collide on the Via Dolorosa.

Read more about walking In His Footsteps from the March-April 2000 issue of our magazine.



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15 April 2014
Greg Kandra




In Ethiopia, cows and oxen are used to stomp on the harvested teff. To learn more about the country’s agricultural industry — and how it’s moving into the modern era — check out Farming a Brighter Future from the January 2010 issue of ONE. (photo: Peter Lemieux)



Tags: Ethiopia
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14 April 2014
Greg Kandra




A Palestinian boy carries palm branches to sell to Christian pilgrims before the annual Palm Sunday procession on the Mount of Olives overlooking the Old City of Jerusalem 13 April. Christian pilgrims walked the path that Jesus took when he rode a donkey into Jerusalem.
(photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)




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11 April 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




Studite Hieromonk Nykanor preaches from the iconostasis of the 17th-century Church of St. Michael the Archangel in Lviv. Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky, head of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church from 1901 to 1944, founded the Studite order along the lines of the monastic traditions of the Christian East to facilitate the reunion of the Catholic and Orthodox churches. To learn more, read If You Pray, They Will Come, from the September-October 2003 issue of the magazine. (photo: Ivan Babichuk)



Tags: Ecumenism Eastern Christianity Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church Monasticism Eastern Catholics
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10 April 2014
Greg Kandra




Berthe Maalouly, at left, leads Holy Apostles College in Jounieh, north of Beirut.
(photo: Sarah Hunter)


Several years ago, we profiled Catholic schools that were making a difference in Lebanon:

Catholic schools can be found throughout Lebanon, in areas where there is little religious diversity or towns where Christians and Muslims live in segregated areas. In such places, the boundaries separating public school districts frequently coincide with community boundaries — thus reinforcing sectarianism.

Catholic schools, meanwhile, enroll students from all communities, whether adjacent, distant, Christian or Muslim. In many parts of Lebanon, they represent the last forum where Christian and Muslim youth meet and grow up knowing one another.

“Catholic schools are natural places where children can come together, sit next to each other and get to know the other person slowly but surely,” said Maronite Father Marwan Tabet, who heads Lebanon’s General Secretariat of Catholic Schools.

“It’s not like you have to shove it down the throats of people — and the kids grow to know each other, to love each other, to accept each other. That’s very important.”

Father Marwan believes the student body’s religious diversity ranks among the greatest strengths of the nation’s Catholic school system. These schools, he said, are a “place where there is no proselytism, where children are not converted to Christianity. On the contrary, they are open to the other culture. They are accepted and they are cared for with the best of means and possibilities.

“When our institutions are accepted in areas that are solely non-Christian,” he concluded, “that fortifies the Catholic school because it is still accepted by the others.”

Read more about the Pillars of Lebanon in the June 2008 issue of ONE.



Tags: Lebanon Education
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9 April 2014
Greg Kandra




In preparations for Holy Week, Pope Tawadros II on Tuesday 8 April prepares holy chrism for the first time since his ordination in November 2012. The event marks the 38th times the chrism has been made in the Coptic Orthodox Church. To learn more about chrism, and its purposes, and to see more pictures of Tuesday’s liturgy, check out this link. And to learn more about the Christians of Egypt, read this profile from our magazine.
(photo: from Coptic Facebook page, via Ahram Online)




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