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June, 2018
Volume 44, Number 2
  
20 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis blesses the camera of Argentine presidential photographer Victor Bugge before his meeting with Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner at the Vatican on 18 March.(photo: CNS/Argentine presidency handout via Reuters)



Tags: Pope Francis

19 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople, right, walks with Bishop Brian Farrell, secretary of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, after attending Pope Francis’ inaugural Mass in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican on 19 March. For the first time since the Great Schism of 1054, the Orthodox ecumenical patriarch attended a pope’s inaugural Mass. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)



Tags: Pope Francis Ecumenism Christian Unity Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I

18 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Women hold candles and pictures of newly elected Pope Francis during a Mass of thanksgiving in his honor at a church in Kolkata, India, on 17 March. (photo: CNS/Rupak De Chowdhuri, Reuters)



Tags: India Pope Francis Indian Christians Indian Catholics

15 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis addresses the College of Cardinals in the Vatican’s Clementine Hall on 15 March. Young people need the wisdom and knowledge of older people, whose insight is like “fine wine that gets better with age,” he told the cardinals. (photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano)



Tags: Pope Francis Vatican Pope

14 March 2013
Greg Kandra




A sand sculpture of the newly-elected Pope Francis, created by Indian artist Sudarshan Patnaik, adorns a beach in Puri, India, on 14 March. (photo: CNS/Reuters)



Tags: India Pope Francis Pope Art

13 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Newly elected Pope Francis, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, greets the crowd from the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica. The 76-year-old Jesuit is from Buenos Aires, Argentina — making him both the first pontiff from the Americas and the first Jesuit pope. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)



Tags: Pope Francis Vatican Pope Papacy

12 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Huddled in the rain, people in St. Peter’s Square watch on a large television monitor as cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel to begin the conclave to elect a successor to Pope Benedict XVI on 12 March. Shut off from the outside world, the 115 cardinals will cast their ballots to select a new pontiff. (photo: CNS/Stefano Rellandini, Reuters)

The conclave to elect to new pope began today, and so did the waiting:

Invoking the aid of the Holy Spirit and the holy men and women from all over the world recognized as saints, 115 cardinals processed slowly into the Sistine Chapel to begin the process to elect a pope.

Once in the chapel, the cardinals from 48 countries vowed that, if elected pope, they would faithfully fulfill the ministry of universal pastor of the church and would defend the rights and freedom of the Holy See.

They also solemnly swore to scrupulously follow the rules for the election of a pope and keep secret the results of the votes, unless they have express permission from the new pope to reveal details.

After reciting the oath together, each cardinal walked up to the Book of the Gospels, put his right hand on it, said his name and sealed his oath, “So help me God and these holy Gospels that I touch with my hand.”

The portion filmed by Vatican television ended with Msgr. Guido Marini, master of papal liturgical ceremonies, saying, “Extra omnes,” ordering out everyone not authorized to remain.

There’s more the Catholic News Service site.



Tags: Vatican Catholic Pope Papacy Rome

11 March 2013
Greg Kandra




In their new village home in Kerala, boys say grace before their meal. (photo: Sean Sprague)

In 2003, we took readers to a community in southwestern India caring for the poor and sick, where people were finding a new home with a new family:

Ajith, 7, and his brother, Ranjith, 10, used to eat dirt to stave off hunger pangs while living on the streets in a remote corner of India’s southwestern state, Kerala. The diet of the two boys, who had been abandoned by their parents, greatly improved, however, after they found a home in a village established two and a half years ago by a Syro-Malabar Catholic priest, Vincentian Father Anthony Plackal.

“We had no food, shelter or clothes, but now we are happy and well-fed,” Ranjith said. “We even attend school.”

The village, located in Vettikkuzi near the Christian heartland of Irinjalakuda, provides much-needed shelter and a new sense of “family” to local homeless people, young and old, healthy and infirm. Ajith and Ranjith live with 80 other residents, or patients as they are called, in six brick homes scattered across the gardens of the community’s 13 acres.

Local demand for the services of the project, dubbed Sacred Scripture Social Message Into Living Experience, or SSSMILE, is growing. The constant devotion of local religious and the construction of a new dormitory, built with financial assistance from CNEWA, will enable the village to help even more of those in need.

Read more on this remarkable project from the November 2003 issue of the magazine.



8 March 2013
Greg Kandra




Workers cover the floor of the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel on 8 March in preparation for the papal conclave. Cardinal electors assembled in Rome will begin voting for the next pope on 12 March. (photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano)

It was announced today that cardinals will begin the process to elect the pope next Tuesday:

Cardinal electors assembled in Rome will begin voting for the next pope on 12 March.

Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman, announced the date for the start of the election, known as a conclave, in a message to reporters on 8 March.

The first session of voting inside the Sistine Chapel will begin in the afternoon, following a morning Mass “Pro eligendo Summo Pontifice” (“for the election of the supreme pontiff”) in St. Peter’s Basilica.

Rules governing papal elections state that a conclave must start between 15 and 20 days after the Holy See falls vacant; but shortly before his resignation on 28 February, Pope Benedict XVI issued a decree allowing cardinal to move up the start date if they choose.

The College of Cardinals decided the date on the fifth day of its pre-conclave meetings, after waiting for the 115 cardinals eligible and expected to vote. The last to arrive in Rome was Cardinal Jean-Baptiste Pham Minh Man of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, who joined the others on 7 March.

At the morning session on 8 March, before announcing the scheduled vote, Cardinal Angelo Sodano, dean of the College of Cardinals, told the assembly that with the changes made by Pope Benedict, the cardinals would not have to debate on whether they were authorized to begin the conclave before 15 March, Father Lombardi said.



Tags: Vatican Pope Papacy Rome

7 March 2013
Greg Kandra




In Ohrid, Macedonia, a priest takes to the streets, blessing the faithful with holy water. (photo: Sean Sprague)

In 2004, writer Sean Sprague visited a corner of Macedonia to report on the thriving faith of the Orthodox:

Although Macedonia became a republic within the newly created Yugoslav federation, which also included Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro and Serbia, the Communist government of Josip Broz Tito encouraged Macedonian nationalists and the independence of the Church of Ohrid — if only to irritate Greek ambitions in the area.

The Archdiocese of Ohrid was restored in 1958. Nine years later on the 200th anniversary of its dissolution and despite opposition from the Serbian Orthodox Church, the Macedonian Orthodox Church proclaimed itself autocephalous.

“We are now a free church and a free people,” exclaimed Father Eftim Betinski, a parish priest from St. George Church. “Now that we have independence, people feel free to visit churches, participate in public ceremonies and make old traditions a part of their lives again.”

When Macedonia was a part of Yugoslavia, people were free to worship, but the Communist government discouraged public religious activities.

“We have an annual tradition where the bishop throws a cross into the lake on 19 January, symbolizing the baptism of Christ. Men dive into the frigid water to retrieve the cross and the one who finds it keeps it for 40 days and receives small donations from people,” Father Betinski said. “The practice used to be forbidden, but now it is allowed.”

The Macedonian Orthodox Church — now under the leadership of Stefan, Archbishop of Ohrid and Macedonia — is clearly growing.

Read more about the Macedonian Orthodox in Answering the Macedonian Question from the July 2004 issue of ONE.



Tags: Cultural Identity Eastern Europe Communism/Communist Macedonia Macedonian Orthodox Church





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