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Volume 44, Number 1
  
26 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Altar servers assist a liturgy at the Armenian Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary in Lviv. (photo: Petro Didula)

In the September issue of ONE, read how Armenians are practicing their faith in western Ukraine in the story Restoring Faith.



Tags: Ukraine Eastern Christianity Armenian Apostolic Church

24 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Msgr. John Kozar, top center, shares a joyful moment with the Vincentian Fathers of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church in southern India. (photo: CNEWA)

In the newest issue of the magazine, Msgr. Kozar reflects on his recent visit to India:

Earlier this year, I was blessed to visit with the Syro-Malabar and Syro-Malankara churches in southern India. It was, for me, a Pentecostal experience. Let me explain.

The energy and enthusiasm of these churches takes one back to the celebration of the first Pentecost. The mandate of our Lord to preach and teach the Good News is alive and active with our brothers and sisters in southern India.

The photo above captures a little of the joyful feeling expressed by a group of Vincentian Fathers of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church, who joined about 10,000 faithful of every age in the culmination of a week-long “Popular Mission.” Imagine this huge crowd of souls who have processed from near and far, gathered in the open air — singing, dancing, shouting their praises to give honor and glory to God and to give witness of their faith to each other. Turn up the decibels, look out at the army of faithful and celebrate that this is what Pentecost is all about.

Read more in the September issue of ONE.



Tags: India Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Indian Christians Syro-Malankara Catholic Church Indian Catholics

21 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Major Archbishop Mar Cleemis, center, consecrates the new cathedral in Pathanamthitta.
(photo: CNEWA)


It doesn’t happen often, but it happened yesterday in Pathanamthitta — the consecration of a new cathedral, dedicated to St. Peter, for the Syro-Malankara Catholic Eparchy of Pathanamthitta, a mountainous jurisdiction in the southwestern Indian state of Kerala.

This morning, we received an e-mail from our regional director in India, M.L. Thomas:

I attended the new cathedral blessing at Pathanamthitta diocese... invited by His Beatitude, Mar Cleemis, Major Archbishop, and His Excellency, Yoohanon Mar Chrysostom, bishop. His Beatitude, Bechara Peter, Patriarch of Antioch of the Maronites, was the special guest in the ceremony.

The Syro-Malankara Eparchy of Pathanamthitta came into existence on 25 January 2010. The eparchy is relatively small: about 810 square miles, consisting of a little over 30,000 Syro-Malankara Catholics.

Bishop Yoohanon Mar Chrysostom (shown above second from the right) is a familiar face. He paid us a visit in June, stopping by our New York office to meet Msgr. Kozar and discuss the activities in his eparchy.

Patriarch Bechara (shown above, second from the left) may also be familiar to our readers. He made a pastoral visit to the United States last fall and met the press at our New York headquarters.

You can read more about the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church here.



Tags: Syria Syro-Malankara Catholic Church

20 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Marcie Alter enjoys the company of Dennis, a therapy dog that visits patients at St. Louis Hospital in Jerusalem once a week. (photo: Debbie Hill)

The current issue of the magazine takes us inside St. Louis Hospital in Jerusalem, an oasis of compassion in a troubled corner of the world. Writer Judith Sudilovsky notes one interesting form of therapy at the hospital:

Three years ago, the hospital joined a project in which volunteers bring therapy animals to the hospital. For some patients, the project has been a great success.

Marcie Alter, a 44-year-old Orthodox Jew originally from Pittsburgh, has been a patient at St. Louis for eight years. All week, she looks forward to her time with Dennis, a Boxer mix.

Almost completely paralyzed and unable to speak, she uses a computer and a letter board to communicate. Most of her family lives in the United States, though she has many friends in Jerusalem who visit her.

A smile spreads on her face when Dennis arrives and jumps on her bed. She reaches out to pet him. With the dog by her side, she points to the letters on the board, spelling out: “It feels like home.”

Read more about An Oasis of Compassion.



Tags: Jerusalem Unity Health Care Multiculturalism

19 September 2012
Greg Kandra




The Saghmos Choir is the pride of the Armenian Apostolic Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary in Lviv, Ukraine. (photo: Petro Didula)

In the current issue of ONE, writer Mariya Tytarenko tells of how Armenians in western Ukraine have worked to rebuild a local church and restore a community’s faith. A key part of that effort has been the local choir:

In the early days, the choir consisted of just a handful of enthusiasts, only one of whom was ethnic Armenian: Father Gevorgian’s 13-year-old daughter Lusine. In the last ten years, however, it has more than doubled in size and improved immeasurably. Named Saghmos, “psalm” in Armenian, the choir now includes 12 singers, five of whom are ethnic Armenians.

“We take great pride in our choir,” says, 66-year-old Bishop Grigoris Bouniatian of the Armenian Apostolic Eparchy of Lviv. “Andriy Shkrabiuk and his choir sing almost the way they did in ancient Armenia.”

In accordance with the church’s ancient tradition, the choir stands not on the balcony, but near the altar during the Divine Liturgy.

“The choir is the motor of prayer,” says Mr. Shkrabiuk.

Read more about Restoring Faith in the September 2012 issue of ONE.



Tags: Ukraine Armenian Apostolic Church

18 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Pope Benedict XVI signs the apostolic exhortation at the Melkite Greek Catholic Basilica of St. Paul in Harissa, Lebanon, on 14 September. Pictured at far left is Melkite Patriarch Gregory III. Standing next to the pope is Archbishop Nikola Eterovic, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops. (photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters)

The Holy See has published online the apostolic exhortation that the Holy Father delivered in Lebanon on Friday. The document, “Ecclesia in Medio Oriente” (On the Church in the Middle East: Communion and Witness), is available in pdf form on the website of the Holy See.

Click here to download the exhortation.



Tags: Lebanon Pope Benedict XVI Melkite Patriarch Gregory III of Antioch Synod of Bishops for Middle East Exhortation

17 September 2012
Erin Edwards




The Zabbaleen are descendants of migrant farmers from Upper Egypt who first came to Cairo in the 1940’s in search of employment. They began working in the garbage trade, collecting, sorting and recycling to earn a living. (photo: Dana Smillie)

The September edition of ONE can now be viewed on our website. Give it a look. One of our features this month comes from award-winning journalist, Sarah Topol. Topol profiles a family in Egypt’s Zabbaleen or “garbage people” community:

The Nagib family lives in Manshiyat Naser — also known as Garbage City — an impoverished Coptic Christian neighborhood nestled in the jutting desert cliffs that rise above Cairo’s bustling streets. Called Zabbaleen, or “garbage people” in Arabic, most hail from the rural province of Assiut, 250 miles to the south. For generations, the Zabbaleen have served as Cairo’s de facto garbage collectors, earning a meager living hauling away city dwellers’ trash and recycling anything salvageable.

To spend time with the Nagib family is to witness in microcosm the struggles of an entire class of people — and to realize that they are struggling not just to salvage what others discard, but also to salvage dignity and a way of life.

Mrs. Nagib’s husband collected trash for a living. Now too old to work, he has passed his route on to his children. And it seems, one by one, the Nagib children are carrying on the tradition.

Six days a week, Mrs. Nagib rises before dawn to see off three of her sons to their work as garbage collectors. At 5, the young men will have climbed into the family truck to head down the slopes to the city — a drive that takes two hours. There, they go from apartment to apartment along their route collecting garbage. By early afternoon, they head home, the truck loaded with trash.

For more, read Salvaging Dignity.



Tags: Egypt Africa ONE magazine

14 September 2012
Erin Edwards




A dance group from Mumbai’s Syro-Malabar Catholic eparchy rehearse a traditional Keralite routine backstage at an annual festival. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

In the January edition of ONE, we featured a story about generations of Thomas Christians from Kerala who have built a community of their own in Mumbai:

“Because the Eparchy of Kalyan was formed exclusively for the Syro-Malabar faithful, a lot of re-evangelization has taken place, meaning people who were on the fringes now started coming forward,” he explains.

“Otherwise, what happens? In the Latin Church, they were unknown. The Latin parish in Vikhroli has 10,000 people and seven Masses every Sunday. Nobody was bothered if they were there or not. But now our parish is very small: a hundred families. We have one liturgy. So if somebody doesn’t come for it, we ask: ‘Where has he gone?’ There’s much more community now that we have the eparchy.”

Mrs. John waits patiently for her husband to finish his thought before speaking. Humble and articulate, she is the perfect blend of the gentility characteristic of rural Kerala and Mumbai’s cosmopolitanism.

“With time, our roots in Kerala have diminished,” she says. “But we still follow all the traditions we learned from our parents. Like when mom passed away, we called everybody over on the 40th day. We follow all the rituals we learned to the core. All the celebrations we do in Kerala are also celebrated here in Mumbai. Basically, we just want to keep our culture alive. We don’t want our kids to lose out on that front — in the home or in the church.”

For more, read A Church of Their Own.



Tags: India Cultural Identity Kerala Migrants

13 September 2012
Erin Edwards




CNEWA has been a longtime supporter of the Kidane Mehret Children's Home and School in Ethiopia. (photo: Gabriel Delmonaco)

At CNEWA, we understand the importance of investing in children and young people. It’s an investment in a better world. In Ethiopia, much of our work supports schools and child care institutions, such as the Kidane Mehret Children’s Home and School. We have shared many stories about Kidane Mehret, whether it be that of a recent graduate’s gratitude or Msgr. Kozar’s visit there earlier this year.

Interested in helping the children of Ethiopia? Find out more on our website.



Tags: Ethiopia CNEWA Education Africa Orphans/Orphanages

12 September 2012
Erin Edwards




Staff and patients attend the evening liturgy at the Amala Hospital chapel in Trichur, Kerala. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

In the September 2011 edition of ONE, Peter Lemieux reported on the role the Syro–Malabar Catholic Church plays in India’s health care system:

For the next 15 minutes, the priest rushes through the multistory facility, distributing Communion to more than 30 patients in various wards. “Here, prayer is so much a part of the culture,” explains Father Paul. “But in a hospital setting, it’s a very fast pace. If you don’t deliver things in time, it’s a problem. Time is critical. If we’re delayed for even a minute, lives are threatened.”

Established in 1978 by the Carmelites of Mary Immaculate — the first and largest religious congregation for men in the Syro–Malabar Catholic Church — the institution consists of a full–service general hospital, a homeopathic hospital, a 100–bed ayurvedic (or traditional Indian medicine) hospital, a cancer research center, a cardiac center as well as a medical school and a nursing college.

The facility offers diagnostic treatment in almost every specialization and boasts the latest medical equipment and information technology, 25 surgical operating rooms and a state–of–the–art radiology department, which most recently acquired a new linear particle accelerator.

The medical school and nursing college together enroll 1,200 students from all over India. In total, more than 2,000 medical professionals and their families reside on the campus.

For more, read Healing Kerala’s Health Care.



Tags: Kerala Health Care Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Carmelite Sisters





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