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December, 2018
Volume 44, Number 4
  
2 October 2012
J.D. Conor Mauro




Despite his busy schedule, Father Jose is always available to his parishioners. (photo: Sean Sprague)

For decades, the people of Kerala have suffered from high poverty rates, exacerbated by high rates of unemployment. The Indian government’s Ministry of Labor and Employment recently released a report revealing that against India’s average rate of 3.8 percent, unemployment in Kerala currently hovers at 9.9 percent. Though lower than a decade ago, this is still very high in absolute terms.

In such an environment, people like Father Jose Thottakkara are a godsend. In the May 2008 issue of ONE, Jomi Thomas reported:

“Once priests start to think of themselves as sacrament machines, they lose the real sense of what they do,” said Father Jose Thottakkara, a Syro-Malabar Catholic priest working in suburban Ernakulam.

A highly educated 44-year-old, Father Jose epitomizes a new, dynamic breed of priest. Founder and director of Naipunya International — a nonprofit agency of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Archeparchy of Ernakulam-Angamaly that places thousands of qualified young people in good jobs worldwide — the priest also leads more than 100 families at St. George Church, a suburban Syro-Malabar parish.

For a son of poor farmers, the priest has accomplished a great deal at a relatively young age. After some eight years of advanced education, he holds degrees in business management, economics, theology and world history. Complementing these studies, he undertook formal and on-the-job training in social work and management. In addition, he has received faculties to serve both Syro-Malabar and Roman Catholic communities.

Father Jose manages a tight schedule during the week. And while his responsibilities at Naipunya take up the lion’s share of his day, the families to whom he ministers remain close to his heart.

Read more about Father Jose in A Priest With Global Reach.



Tags: India Kerala Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Economic hardships

1 October 2012
Christopher Boland




Nikolay Vakulin and Melkonian Haykaz exercise in the yard of the shelter for elders run by Caritas Austria. In a 2007 Caritas Armenia survey, 76 percent of elderly respondents and 60 percent of other respondents considered adequate medical services to be unavailable in northern Armenia. (photo: Justyna Mielnikiewicz)

Poverty and unemployment rates hover around 40 percent in northern Armenia. The only hospital in the vicinity is the Catholic-run Tiramayr Narek Hospital in Ashotzk. Thanks to support form CNEWA and Caritas Italy, the hospital serves some 30,000 patients from as far away as Gyumri (62 miles south) and Vardenis (124 miles southeast) and conducts about 1,800 complicated surgeries per year. In the March 2009 issue of ONE, Gayane Abrahamyan discusses this institution:

Razmik Minasian, his face tanned from laboring in the sun, swiftly paces up and down a white sterile hallway in Tiramayr Narek Hospital in Armenia’s northernmost town of Ashotzk. Again and again, he looks worriedly at the closed door from where the cry of his 4-month-old son can be heard.

“Had we managed to get here earlier, this wouldn’t have happened,” he said as he approached his wife who sat nervously beside the door.

The Minasians live in Samtskhe-Javakheti, a predominantly Armenian region in southern Georgia near Armenia’s northern border. The couple made the three-hour journey to Tiramayr Narek because the infant’s temperature had reached a dangerous 104 degrees and the Catholic-run facility is the only one in the vicinity that offers quality care at little or no cost.

Read more in Armenian Winter.



Tags: CNEWA Armenia Health Care Caring for the Elderly Caritas

28 September 2012
Greg Kandra




A little girl plays in the village of Horpyn in Ukraine. Read about the ethnic and religious patchwork of the region in this article from the March 2009 issue of ONE. (photo: Petro Didula)



Tags: Ukraine Russia Crimea

27 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Asela orphanage alumnus Matheas Hussein studies music at Addis Ababa University. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)

Four years ago, ONE took a look at a remarkable school in Ethiopia that cares for hundreds of orphaned boys with special needs and gives them training that can help transform their lives:

Asela’s orphanage school owes a good deal of its recent success to Father Renato Saudelli, I.M.C., who was appointed its director in 1991. An ardent advocate for sustainable development, Father Saudelli has integrated vocational skills training with the school’s academic curriculum so every student has a better chance at succeeding once they enter the work force.

Father Saudelli’s legacy, however, has been his work with the fine arts and music programs at the school. Thanks to his tireless efforts, these programs have thrived in recent years.

An artist himself, the Italian-born priest threw his weight behind the school’s art program the moment he assumed leadership responsibilities. With honest effort, patience, individual attention and, of course, the best available art materials, Father Saudelli believes all children can discover the joy of, as well as their unique talent for, creating art. For this reason, he encourages the disabled children to take advantage of the art program. Artistic expression using one’s hands, he believes, can help instill a sense of pride, particularly in those who may be physically handicapped in other ways.

The school’s music program, which Father Saudelli vigorously supports in tandem with the fine arts program, has also come into its own under the priest’s direction. A growing number of alumni have chosen to pursue careers in music, and many more have found inspiration through their musical training. …

A prospective graduate of the Yared Music School at Addis Ababa University, Matheas Hussein plays part-time in a local band, Harlem Jazz, which enjoys some celebrity in Addis Ababa. After graduating from the Consolata Fathers’ school, Mr. Hussein was recruited by a private college. His passion for music, however, led him to the Yared Music School. He persistently applied for admission, never losing hope. Finally, after three years, he was accepted to the program.

Read more on Revealing Hidden Talent.



Tags: Ethiopia Education

26 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Altar servers assist a liturgy at the Armenian Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary in Lviv. (photo: Petro Didula)

In the September issue of ONE, read how Armenians are practicing their faith in western Ukraine in the story Restoring Faith.



Tags: Ukraine Eastern Christianity Armenian Apostolic Church

24 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Msgr. John Kozar, top center, shares a joyful moment with the Vincentian Fathers of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church in southern India. (photo: CNEWA)

In the newest issue of the magazine, Msgr. Kozar reflects on his recent visit to India:

Earlier this year, I was blessed to visit with the Syro-Malabar and Syro-Malankara churches in southern India. It was, for me, a Pentecostal experience. Let me explain.

The energy and enthusiasm of these churches takes one back to the celebration of the first Pentecost. The mandate of our Lord to preach and teach the Good News is alive and active with our brothers and sisters in southern India.

The photo above captures a little of the joyful feeling expressed by a group of Vincentian Fathers of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church, who joined about 10,000 faithful of every age in the culmination of a week-long “Popular Mission.” Imagine this huge crowd of souls who have processed from near and far, gathered in the open air — singing, dancing, shouting their praises to give honor and glory to God and to give witness of their faith to each other. Turn up the decibels, look out at the army of faithful and celebrate that this is what Pentecost is all about.

Read more in the September issue of ONE.



Tags: India Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Indian Christians Indian Catholics Syro-Malankara Catholic Church

21 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Major Archbishop Mar Cleemis, center, consecrates the new cathedral in Pathanamthitta.
(photo: CNEWA)


It doesn’t happen often, but it happened yesterday in Pathanamthitta — the consecration of a new cathedral, dedicated to St. Peter, for the Syro-Malankara Catholic Eparchy of Pathanamthitta, a mountainous jurisdiction in the southwestern Indian state of Kerala.

This morning, we received an e-mail from our regional director in India, M.L. Thomas:

I attended the new cathedral blessing at Pathanamthitta diocese... invited by His Beatitude, Mar Cleemis, Major Archbishop, and His Excellency, Yoohanon Mar Chrysostom, bishop. His Beatitude, Bechara Peter, Patriarch of Antioch of the Maronites, was the special guest in the ceremony.

The Syro-Malankara Eparchy of Pathanamthitta came into existence on 25 January 2010. The eparchy is relatively small: about 810 square miles, consisting of a little over 30,000 Syro-Malankara Catholics.

Bishop Yoohanon Mar Chrysostom (shown above second from the right) is a familiar face. He paid us a visit in June, stopping by our New York office to meet Msgr. Kozar and discuss the activities in his eparchy.

Patriarch Bechara (shown above, second from the left) may also be familiar to our readers. He made a pastoral visit to the United States last fall and met the press at our New York headquarters.

You can read more about the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church here.



Tags: Syria Syro-Malankara Catholic Church

20 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Marcie Alter enjoys the company of Dennis, a therapy dog that visits patients at St. Louis Hospital in Jerusalem once a week. (photo: Debbie Hill)

The current issue of the magazine takes us inside St. Louis Hospital in Jerusalem, an oasis of compassion in a troubled corner of the world. Writer Judith Sudilovsky notes one interesting form of therapy at the hospital:

Three years ago, the hospital joined a project in which volunteers bring therapy animals to the hospital. For some patients, the project has been a great success.

Marcie Alter, a 44-year-old Orthodox Jew originally from Pittsburgh, has been a patient at St. Louis for eight years. All week, she looks forward to her time with Dennis, a Boxer mix.

Almost completely paralyzed and unable to speak, she uses a computer and a letter board to communicate. Most of her family lives in the United States, though she has many friends in Jerusalem who visit her.

A smile spreads on her face when Dennis arrives and jumps on her bed. She reaches out to pet him. With the dog by her side, she points to the letters on the board, spelling out: “It feels like home.”

Read more about An Oasis of Compassion.



Tags: Jerusalem Unity Health Care Multiculturalism

19 September 2012
Greg Kandra




The Saghmos Choir is the pride of the Armenian Apostolic Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary in Lviv, Ukraine. (photo: Petro Didula)

In the current issue of ONE, writer Mariya Tytarenko tells of how Armenians in western Ukraine have worked to rebuild a local church and restore a community’s faith. A key part of that effort has been the local choir:

In the early days, the choir consisted of just a handful of enthusiasts, only one of whom was ethnic Armenian: Father Gevorgian’s 13-year-old daughter Lusine. In the last ten years, however, it has more than doubled in size and improved immeasurably. Named Saghmos, “psalm” in Armenian, the choir now includes 12 singers, five of whom are ethnic Armenians.

“We take great pride in our choir,” says, 66-year-old Bishop Grigoris Bouniatian of the Armenian Apostolic Eparchy of Lviv. “Andriy Shkrabiuk and his choir sing almost the way they did in ancient Armenia.”

In accordance with the church’s ancient tradition, the choir stands not on the balcony, but near the altar during the Divine Liturgy.

“The choir is the motor of prayer,” says Mr. Shkrabiuk.

Read more about Restoring Faith in the September 2012 issue of ONE.



Tags: Ukraine Armenian Apostolic Church

18 September 2012
Greg Kandra




Pope Benedict XVI signs the apostolic exhortation at the Melkite Greek Catholic Basilica of St. Paul in Harissa, Lebanon, on 14 September. Pictured at far left is Melkite Patriarch Gregory III. Standing next to the pope is Archbishop Nikola Eterovic, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops. (photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters)

The Holy See has published online the apostolic exhortation that the Holy Father delivered in Lebanon on Friday. The document, “Ecclesia in Medio Oriente” (On the Church in the Middle East: Communion and Witness), is available in pdf form on the website of the Holy See.

Click here to download the exhortation.



Tags: Lebanon Pope Benedict XVI Melkite Patriarch Gregory III of Antioch Synod of Bishops for Middle East Exhortation





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