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Current Issue
March, 2018
Volume 44, Number 1
  
22 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Georgian Orthodox Christians employ a unique style of chant believed to have been developed between the seventh and tenth centuries in the historical region of Tao-Klarjeti, now part of Turkey. Read more about the preservation and practice of Georgian chant in A Renaissance in Georgia, from the January 2011 edition of ONE, or click the image for an audio sample. (photo: Molly Corso)



Tags: Cultural Identity Georgia Art Georgian Orthodox Church

21 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




A woman roasts coffee beans with her son on their farm outside Bonga, Ethiopia. The Kaffa region is known for its coffee production, grown in high altitudes. This region is thought to be the original home of the coffee plant, but recent reports suggest climate change could spell disaster for this traditional industry. To learn more about Ethiopia’s connection to coffee, read Brewed to Perfection, from the November 2011 edition of ONE. (photo: Per-Anders Pettersson/Corbis News/Getty Images)



Tags: Ethiopia Farming/Agriculture Climate change

20 June 2017
Dan Meloy, Catholic News Service




A woman holds a sign and cross as members of the local Chaldean community demonstrate on 16 June outside the Patrick V. McNamara Federal Building to protest the arrest and detention of more than 100 Chaldean Christians from the Detroit area. (photo: CNS/Jim West)

The organizer of a 16 June protest in Detroit against federal agents’ rounding up more than 100 Iraqi-American immigrants told local media that those who were detained had no prior warning that Immigration and Customs Enforcement would be arresting them the morning of 11 June.

Joined by U.S. Democratic Reps. Sander Levin and Brenda Lawrence of Michigan, members of the Chaldean Christian community gathered in front of the Patrick V. McNamara Federal Building. They held up signs, crosses and American flags, venting their frustration against federal authorities who detained their father, brothers and uncles, many of whom have been in the community for decades.

Martin Manna, president of the Chaldean Chamber of Commerce, organized the demonstration.

“I represent a rich cove of the Iraqi-Chaldean community, and when I called Martin Manna, I got here quickly,” Lawrence said. “Chaldeans are our friends, our neighbors.

“Why did ICE decide to target and round up Iraqi-Americans? Where is the written policy?” Lawrence asked, referring to the “verbal agreement” U.S. President Donald Trump had with the Iraqi government regarding accepting deportees from the United States.

Levin and five others from the Michigan delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives wrote a letter to U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly, requesting a copy of the U.S. government’s agreement with Iraq so it can be subject to congressional oversight and to hold off on sending the detainees to Iraq until their safety can be guaranteed.

“We are here on behalf of the Chaldean community, proclaiming this as not only a Chaldean issue, but an American issue,” Levin said. “We’re saying to ICE, let there be time for justice. Sec. Kelly said, ‘we’re only going after the ‘worst of the worst.&rsquo There arrests have been made without regard to what crime has been committed, or what sentences have already been served.

“This is a country that believes in due process for everybody, even for immigrants,” he continued. “America is more than just numbers, but the human lives behind them. I ask my colleagues, delay deportation. We're here together for the Chaldean community.”

Family members of those who have been detained shared their stories, stating how many were preparing to attend Sunday Mass when ICE officials knocked on their doors, asking to go with them to the Iraqi Consulate; some were promised they would be returned to their homes.

“We’ve heard stories of an 80-year old man, who was carried away by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) in chains,” said Nidal Zawaideh of Bloomfield Hills, who showed up to protest to support her fellow Chaldeans. “They talk about the crimes they’ve committed. This man hit his wife 50 years ago, had the police called. But that was 50 years ago; these people are not a threat to society.”

After the roundup, ICE officials would not confirm the number taken into custody but said those arrested had criminal convictions, including for murder, rape, assault, burglary, weapons violations and drug trafficking. They said the action was the result of recent negotiations between the U.S. and Iraq, which had agreed “to take back Iraqi nationals convicted of crimes.”

WJBK-TV reported that an ICE spokesperson said that “each of these individuals received full and fair immigration proceedings, after which a federal immigration judge found them ineligible for any form of relief under U.S. law and ordered them removed.”

Father Anthony Kathawa, parochial vicar of St. Thomas Chaldean Catholic Church in West Bloomfield, said many in the parish and surrounding Chaldean parishes have called, asking for help and not receiving many answers.

“There is a lot of pain, confusion, with them asking questions and getting now answers,” Father Kathawa told The Michigan Catholic, newspaper of the Detroit Archdiocese. “We have to lean on our faith, because there are so many questions.”

He said that Bishop Francis Y. Kalabat, who heads the Chaldean Catholic Eparchy of St. Thomas the Apostle, based in Southfield, “has requested every parish celebrate a special Mass and maintain a Holy Hour at every Chaldean parish in the area.”

Father Kathawa couldn’t confirm how many of his parishioners have been detained, saying there have been many.

“The people that are detained ... I never guessed they’d have a criminal background,” Father Kathawa said. “They are really involved in their parishes; they’ve brought great change to the community. Those who were convicted of crimes, they’ve paid their debt. Part of Christianity is believing in redemption, believing in forgiveness.”



19 June 2017
CNEWA staff




Some children in the Kiev Archeparchy of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church who have benefitted from CNEWA’s support express their appreciation. (photo: CNEWA)

We received these images from Anna Dombrovska, who works on projects for us in Ukraine. She writes:

The Kiev Archeparchy of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and its parishes pray for all those who donated and supported it through CNEWA. With this special prayer the people of the Kiev Archeparchy would like to thank all its donors for their generous support.


With support from CNEWA, parishes have been helping resettle women, orphans and families from Donbass.


They have been helping those in need and now continue to build a strong church in Ukraine.


We continue to be uplifted and inspired by the generosity of our donors — and grateful for their continued support. We add our voice to those of the good people of Ukraine, to say to our donors, “Thank you and God bless you.” We pray for you!



16 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Altar servers make their way to the Divine Liturgy at the Orthodox cathedral in Antioch. Read more about Turkey’s Melting Pot, and the many faiths that reside there, in the May 2011 edition of ONE. (photo: Sean Sprague)



15 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Svetlana Kikadze, 70, receives physical therapy for her rheumatism at the Caritas clinic in Tbilisi, Georgia. The clinic seeks to help elderly pensioners who have fallen through the cracks — those abandoned by family and friends and who are often homeless and displaced. Read more about how the church cares for those who are Penniless, Bruised and Sick in the November 2008 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)



14 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Eucharist and study are central in the lives of Coptic Catholic seminarians at St. Leo the Great, located in a Cairo suburb. To learn more about the Coptic Catholic Church, check out this profile in the September 2007 edition of ONE. (photo: Mohamed El-Dakhakhny)



Tags: Egypt Coptic Catholic Church Egypt's Christians

13 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Pilgrims scale the cliff to enter Ethiopia’s Debra Damo Monastery. To learn more about Ethiopian monasticism, check out Relevant or Relic? In the November 2010 edition of ONE.
(photo: Sean Sprague)




12 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Tamara Chitova, 88, enjoys a rare meal in her own home in Georgia. Read about how a Human Touch Offers Pensioners Respite in the July-August 2003 edition of our magazine.
(photo: Dima Chikvaidze)




9 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Sister Femily Jose of the Sisters of the Destitute leads a self-help group in a village in eastern Kerala. To learn about some of the efforts of the church to provide social support in this region, read Breaking the Cycle in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)



Tags: India Sisters Village life





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