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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
16 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Altar servers make their way to the Divine Liturgy at the Orthodox cathedral in Antioch. Read more about Turkey’s Melting Pot, and the many faiths that reside there, in the May 2011 edition of ONE. (photo: Sean Sprague)



15 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Svetlana Kikadze, 70, receives physical therapy for her rheumatism at the Caritas clinic in Tbilisi, Georgia. The clinic seeks to help elderly pensioners who have fallen through the cracks — those abandoned by family and friends and who are often homeless and displaced. Read more about how the church cares for those who are Penniless, Bruised and Sick in the November 2008 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)



14 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Eucharist and study are central in the lives of Coptic Catholic seminarians at St. Leo the Great, located in a Cairo suburb. To learn more about the Coptic Catholic Church, check out this profile in the September 2007 edition of ONE. (photo: Mohamed El-Dakhakhny)



Tags: Egypt Coptic Catholic Church Egypt's Christians

13 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Pilgrims scale the cliff to enter Ethiopia’s Debra Damo Monastery. To learn more about Ethiopian monasticism, check out Relevant or Relic? In the November 2010 edition of ONE.
(photo: Sean Sprague)




12 June 2017
Greg Kandra




Tamara Chitova, 88, enjoys a rare meal in her own home in Georgia. Read about how a Human Touch Offers Pensioners Respite in the July-August 2003 edition of our magazine.
(photo: Dima Chikvaidze)




9 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Sister Femily Jose of the Sisters of the Destitute leads a self-help group in a village in eastern Kerala. To learn about some of the efforts of the church to provide social support in this region, read Breaking the Cycle in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)



Tags: India Sisters Village life

8 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Cairo protesters gather outside St. Mark’s Coptic Orthodox Cathedral after a bomb attack on 11 December. To learn more about how Christians are keeping the faith in Egypt, often under difficult circumstances, read Anxiety in Cairo in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: David Degner)



Tags: Egypt Violence against Christians Coptic Christians Coptic Orthodox Church Coptic

7 June 2017
Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D.




Palestinian girls stand in front the Dome of the Rock as they attend the first Friday prayers of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan at Jerusalem’s Al Aqsa Mosque compound on 2 June 2017. (photo: Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

As Muslims around the world observe Ramadan, the holy month of fasting, the Pew Research Center has released its report “Muslims and Islam: Key Findings in the U.N. and around the world.” Originally published on 7 December 2016, the report has been updated and released again on 26 May 2017.

As is the case with most Pew Reports, it is detailed yet easy to read and understand. It provides a great deal of information about the number of Muslims in the world as well as in Europe and North America. Not surprisingly, Islam is the fastest growing religion on the planet.

The report also investigates how Muslims feel about certain issues and how different non-Muslim groups feel about Muslims. It is noted that attitudes toward Muslims in the United States, for example, differ according to one’s party affiliation and that southern Europeans generally have a more negative attitude toward Muslims than do northern Europeans. An interesting study contrasts how Muslims in Islamic-dominated countries characterize the West and how non-Muslims in the West characterize Muslims. These provide important areas for dialogue and growth in mutual understanding.

Two other important issues are treated, though not equally well, in the report. The first issue is how Muslims feel about “groups like ISIS.” The overwhelming majority of Muslims both in and outside Muslim majority countries do not approve of violent extremism. This is extremely important to note.

Less satisfactory, however, is the section on “Support for Sharia.” Questions about sharia are often used by people who fear it becoming the law in more secular countries. In an unintended way, the section on “Support for Sharia” might seem to verify these fears as large majorities in Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa “favor making sharia the official law in their country.”

There are many problems with this. The report describes sharia as “a legal code based on the Quran and other Islamic scripture.” The first thing to note is that there is no “other Islamic scripture” other than the Quran; and secondly in no sense of the word is sharia a “legal code.”

“Sharia” is not a univocal term and Muslims — even those who favor making it the law of their land — have very different understandings of what that might mean. In addition, “sharia” is a religiously charged term. Few Muslims, if any, would spontaneously be against sharia even if they had little or no understanding of what it might actually mean historically and practically. As a result “sharia” with no qualifications is generally speaking not a helpful category when researching Muslim opinions.

Nevertheless, the Pew Foundation has once again provided valuable and much needed information about Islam, a religion that is misunderstood.



Tags: Muslim Islam Ramadan Religious Differences

6 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Youth from 14 parishes receive lunch at a summer program in Alitena, Ethiopia. Meal programs in schools, camps and other venues are a crucial, successful element of the Ethiopian Catholic Church’s efforts to support local communities throughout Ethiopia — efforts CNEWA is proud to assist. In March, we published a letter from Abune Tesfaselassie Medhin, bishop of the Ethiopian Catholic Eparchy of Adigrat, describing the challenges facing currently facing both church and country. You can read this and more in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: CNEWA)



Tags: Ethiopia Hunger Ethiopian Catholic Church Youth

5 June 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Women pray over the casket of Ukrainian Cardinal Lubomyr Husar during his 5 June funeral liturgy at the Patriarchal Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ in Kiev. Cardinal Husar died 31 May at the age of 84. (photo: CNS/Valentyn Ogirenko, Reuters)



Tags: Ukraine Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church





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