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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
3 December 2015
Greg Kandra




The Alslivi children — who moved from Mosul, Iraq, to Sweden — brave a harsh winter’s day to do some grocery shopping. To learn more about Iraqi refugees in Sweden, read “A Nordic Refuge No More” in the May 2011 edition of ONE. (photo: Magnus Aronson)



2 December 2015
Greg Kandra




Although the Feast of St. Nicholas doesn’t come until 6 December, the saint made an early appearance at the pope’s General Audience on Wednesday. Wolfgang Georg Kimmig-Liebe of Germany, dressed as St. Nicholas, stands among the crowd before Pope Francis arrives for his weekly audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican on 2 December.
(photo: CNS/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters)




1 December 2015
Greg Kandra




A sister feeds a resident at Asha Bhavan, a home for the elderly and destitute in Kerala, India.
(photo: Jose Jacob)


Today marks #GivingTuesday, a global event to encourage the spirit of giving during the holiday season. As we noted last week:

On #Giving Tuesday, CNEWA will raise funds to ease hunger. Nutrition is a challenge for every initiative we support. In hospitals, mother-and-child clinics, orphanages, schools and Bible camps — and every facility that helps refugees — everyone needs to eat.

#Giving Tuesday will let us help churches and religious sisters provide healthy formula for infants. Lunches for school children. Hot meals for the elderly and sick. As Pope Francis noted, “We are in front of a global scandal, one billion people who still suffer from hunger today. We cannot look the other way and pretend this does not exist.”

To give on #Giving Tuesday — or even in advance — use your computer, smart phone or tablet. To make donating easy, we’re harnessing the power of CrowdRise. One of America’s most highly-regarded funding web sites, it’s an online giving hub that brings together ordinary people, diverse charities and companies. All to support important causes.

Read more about this special event and how you can help us help others.



30 November 2015
Greg Kandra




Migrants from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan arrive at the transit and registration camp in the town of Presevo, southern Serbia, on 24 November. The extensive vetting process that all refugees undergo before arriving in the United States, “screens out any possible threat of terrorism,” said the executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Migration and Refugee Services. Read more. To help Syrian Christians still in the Middle East survive the winter, please visit this giving page.
(photo: CNS/Djordje Savic, EPA)




25 November 2015
J.D. Conor Mauro




Under police protection, workers rebuild St. Sebastian Church in Dilshad Garden, New Delhi. In response to a rash of anti-Christian violence, officers have been assigned to guard churches within the city. To learn more, read ‘There Will Be More Martyrs’, from ONE’s Autumn 2015 edition. (photo: Jose Jacob)



Tags: India Violence against Christians Indian Christians Indian Catholics

24 November 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from September, donated shoes await child refugees from Syria arriving in Hungary. Hundreds of faith leaders have called for compassion in addressing the world refugee crisis. Read more here. (photo: CNS/Paul Jeffrey)



23 November 2015
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis poses with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko during a meeting at the Vatican
on 20 November. (photo: CNS/Alessandra Tarantino, pool via Reuters)


On Friday, Pope Francis met with Ukraine’s president. Some details, from CNS:

Although the conflict between Ukraine and Russian-backed separatists continues, Pope Francis and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko still share hope that a political solution still can be found, the Vatican said.

Welcoming Poroshenko to the Vatican on November 20, the pope greeted him in Ukrainian. Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, explained that at the age of 11, the young Jorge Mario Bergoglio learned a few phrases of Ukrainian when he served as an altar boy for a Ukrainian Catholic priest in Buenos Aires.

Pope Francis and Poroshenko spoke privately for more than 20 minutes. The Vatican said that their conversation was “dedicated principally to matters connected with the situation of conflict in the country.”

“In this respect, the hope was shared that, with the commitment of all the interested parties, political solutions may be favored, starting with the full implementation of the Minsk Accords,” a cease-fire agreement signed in September 2014, the statement said.

Additionally, the two expressed their concerns regarding the difficulties in providing humanitarian relief, healthcare in areas of the country where the fighting continues.

The Ukrainian president gave the pope a glass sculpture of an angel, which represented “a messenger of God who brings peace to every home and reminds us of such principal values of life as God’s blessing, family, labor and peaceful skies overhead.”

Poroshenko told the pope he hoped “that with this you will remember Ukraine.”



20 November 2015
Lou Baldwin, Catholic News Service




Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk of Kiev-Halych, major archbishop of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, celebrates the Divine Liturgy at the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Philadelphia on 15 November. At right is Archbishop Stefan Soroka of Philadelphia. (photo: CNS/Sarah Webb)

In 2009, the Rev. Sviatoslav Shevchuk, a priest of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, was named a bishop and sent to Buenos Aires, Argentina, as an auxiliary bishop and administrator of the Eparchy of Santa Maria.

At that time he was just 38, the youngest Catholic bishop in the world.

Just two years later, despite his youth, his brother bishops meeting for a five-day synod in Lviv elected him major archbishop of Kiev-Halych, the head of the entire Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. The election was ratified by Pope Benedict XVI.

During his brief administration in Buenos Aires, his mentor was Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, then the archbishop of Buenos Aires, now Pope Francis. The two became friends.

“I think Pope Francis has deep religious spirituality,” Archbishop Shevchuk observed during a 13-15 November visit to Philadelphia. “His special gift is to discern and appreciate each gift from the Holy Spirit, and he was an outstanding father and adviser to me, he introduced me to the council of bishops in Argentina and helped me with my orientation.”

More recently he served on the preparatory commission for the October 2014 extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family and this October’s world Synod of Bishops on the family. He recalls the first time meeting the now-Pope Francis while he was there. He started to talk to the pontiff in Italian.

“He said to me, ‘Did you forget your Spanish?’ so we talked in Spanish,” Archbishop Shevchuk told CatholicPhilly.com, the news site of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

While in Philadelphia, Archbishop Shevchuk celebrated Divine Liturgy at the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception on 15 November. He blessed new mosaics honoring Blessed Josaphata Hordashevska, foundress of the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate and Major Archbishop Andrey Sheptytsky of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, who died in a Soviet prison in 1944. In July, Pope Francis signed a decree recognizing his heroic virtues and declaring him venerable.

The primary reason for Archbishop Shevchuk’s visit to the U.S. was to participate in the unveiling in Washington of the Holodomor-Forced Famine Monument, which honors the memory of millions of Ukrainians who starved to death in 1932-33 during forced collectivization instigated by the Stalin regime.

“We call it genocide,” Archbishop Shevchuk said. “In Ukrainian territory alone according to studies at least 5 million were killed.”

On 7 November, he blessed the monument, which was authorized by Congress in 2006. Ukraine, which was ruled mostly by Russia and other neighboring countries for centuries, regained full independence in 1991 after the collapse of the Soviet Union but relations between the Russian Federation and Ukraine deteriorated with the annexation of Crimea by Russia and incursions in other nearby Ukrainian territory in 2014.

“The desire of the Ukrainian nation is not to move back to the Soviet Union but forward to democracy to autonomy,” Archbishop Shevchuk said. “Right now there is a fragile cease-fire but we are concerned about re-escalation.”

While in Washington, the Catholic archbishop and other Ukrainian religious leaders representing the Orthodox, Jewish, Lutheran, Muslim and evangelical Christian faiths, among others, held a news conference 9 November calling on President Barack Obama and Congress to greatly increase the level of humanitarian aid for those suffering in the midst of the ongoing conflict in Ukraine, especially as winter approaches.

In a nation of 45 million, the Ukrainian Greek Catholic population is about 4.5 million with an additional 2.5 million members abroad. “We are the largest Eastern Catholic Church in the world,” the archbishop said.

Although most other believers are Orthodox Christians along with Protestant, Jewish and Muslim communities, “Our (All-Ukrainian) Council of the Churches and Religious Organizations is our most powerful NGO, representing 85 percent of the people” Archbishop Shevchuk said. “The council enables us not only to listen to each other but to solve our problems. We not only coexist, we cooperate.”

To be part of the Ukrainian nation, one does not have to be ethnically Ukrainian, Archbishop Shevchuk explained, pointing to the large number of Poles, Jews, Russians and other nationalities, with a large part of the army being Russian speakers. “We are a free people, a country with European values and respect for human dignity, which lays the foundation to the nation.”

Just as Ukraine is multi-ethnic, so too is the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, which during communist rule was essentially an underground church, according to Archbishop Shevchuk.

“We are a global church,” he said “We are in the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Australia, Western Europe, Siberia and even China. We pray in different languages. We are open to sharing our Eastern Catholic traditions, our spirituality, our liturgy with all.”

Although Ukrainian Greek Catholics are a minority both in the country of their origin and around the world, including the United States, the aim is always communion not conformity.

“We always learn to think as a minority, but our authority goes beyond being a small community,” Archbishop Shevchuk said. “We learn how to overcome our limits, to be flexible, to present our treasures in a practical way so that people will appreciate them.”

In his visit to the United States and the various Ukrainian Greek Catholic communities, Archbishop Shevchuk most desired to bring attention to the current situation in Ukraine. “We do need the help of the international community, not only to stop a war but to help those who have been injured by war,” he said. “I especially want to thank all Catholics in America who participate in the collection for Eastern churches. Right now, that is vital.”



Tags: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk

19 November 2015
Greg Kandra




Nina Moshy, left, and Rosemary Yachouh stand in front of the Ryerson Student Centre in Toronto to spread awareness about the plight of Syrian refugees. (photo: Jean Ko Din/Catholic Register)

Students in Canada are showing solidarity with Syrian refugees — and raising funds for CNEWA.

From The Catholic Register:

Many members of the Assyrian Chaldean Syriac Student Union (ACSSU) have grown up in Canada watching from a distance as civil wars tear apart their homelands and force their relatives and friends to flee. As tensions rise and more people are displaced, ACSSU members believe they can make a difference.

From 16 to 19 November, ACSSU chapters at Toronto’s Ryerson and York Universities and the University of Toronto; McMaster in Hamilton, Ontario; and Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, set up camp in front of their school’s student centers to raise awareness and money in support of refugees in Iraq and Syria. For three nights and four days, ACCSU members are experiencing the “Life of a Mesopotamian Refugee.”

“We’re here to raise awareness and money for people who are not here,” said Rosemary Yachouh, president of ACSSU Canada. “I’m just hoping to get the word out. … I want to make myself feel what people back home are feeling for the extent that I’m able to.”

About 12 students slept in tents for three nights without electronics and other conveniences. The students only ate food brought to them by others.

During the day, students handed out flyers and talked with passers-by about the plight of displaced peoples in Iraq and Syria. They also visited classrooms to talk to different student groups about donating money to send much needed food, shelter and clothing overseas.

ACSSU hopes to raise at least $25,000 for the Catholic Near East Welfare Association (CNEWA).

Generally, Yachouh said people have been open to being engaged in conversation. Students want to know more about what’s going on?in the world. Many have passed by their tables and tents to share their thoughts and feelings about the recent terrorist attacks in Paris and Beirut.

“We’re not just about raising money. We also want to get people’s time. We want to tell them what’s happening,” said Yachouh. “So by having a physical presence and actually giving ourselves that experience of living like refugees, I think it shows the Canadian community that there is a bigger thing happening outside of this country.”

Read more.



Tags: Syria Iraq Refugees Middle East Iraqi Refugees

18 November 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from September, a laborer works to rebuild the 160-year old Mardin Protestant Church in Mardin, Turkey, one of the oldest Protestant churches in the Middle East. The first religious service in 60 years was held at the church on Sunday. Read more and see a picture of the completed work here. (photo: Don Duncan)







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