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September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
23 September 2015
Greg Kandra




A priest blesses his congregation in the Church of the Virgin Mary in Nazla, Egypt, one of the many churches burned in August 2013. Read more about Egypt’s efforts to recover in “Out of the Ashes” in the Spring 2015 edition of ONE. And join Pope Francis in bringing hope to Egypt’s Christians. Visit this link to learn how. (photo: David Degner)



22 September 2015
Greg Kandra




Palestinian Christian Nadim Khoury, master brewer and co-founder of the Taybeh Brewery Company, pours a beer at the Taybeh Oktoberfest in the West Bank village of Taybeh
on 19 September. (photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)


In 2011, we visited the town of Taybeh, “the only entirely Christian village in Palestine,” and we turned a spotlight on its annual Oktoberfest:

The family — owned Taybeh Brewery began modestly, when brothers Nadim and Daoud Khoury returned to their hometown to help rebuild the local economy. Over the next decade, the brothers worked tirelessly to improve their product and expand the business.

The Khoury family has lived in Taybeh for at least 600 years. The brothers’ grandfather served as the pastor of the local Orthodox parish. As children, they attended school in nearby Ramallah. But as young adults, conflict and the resulting dearth of educational and economic opportunities drove the brothers to set out for the United States, where they completed their studies and lived for several years.

“We came back after the Oslo Agreement. First, my brother Nadim came in 1994 and I myself followed in 1999,” says Daoud Khoury, who since 2005 has served as Taybeh’s mayor.

“I wanted to do something for my small village. It is important to me to keep Taybeh a Christian village in Palestine. I mean no prejudice, but we are surrounded by 16 Muslim villages and live with them peacefully,” explains Mayor Khoury.

“But, I and my fellow citizens feel it is a treasure that we inherited this land from our great–grandfathers. They passed down the land from generation to generation and did not sell it, even though they were probably in need back then. We feel it is our duty to preserve the land and keep Taybeh Christian.”

Since opening its doors, Taybeh Brewery has steadily earned a local and international reputation for its high quality, all–natural selection of beers, which includes a popular golden stout and nonalcoholic alternative.

Now, this year’s Oktoberfest is in full swing, and CNS dropped by:

As Palestinians and Israelis in Jerusalem once again became embroiled in violence, locals and guests in Taybeh were enjoying ice-cold beers, grilled meats, frosted doughnuts and throbbing music as the all-Christian Palestinian village celebrated its 11th Oktoberfest.

“This gathering is good,” said a beaming Nadim Khoury, who together with his brother, David, opened the village’s now-famous Taybeh microbrewery, which hosts the festival. That was in 1995, two years after Nadim Khoury returned from an extended sojourn in the United States.

“It brings unity to all the people here; they share, sell local products, drink beer, eat,” Nadim Khoury said. “We show the world we can have a normal life, we celebrate life. The Middle East always has problems; this is our peaceful resistance.”

Over the pulsating rap of a local Palestinian band, David Khoury, a former village mayor, remarked: “We brought democracy to Palestine by selling beer,” he said. “And someday we will toast peace over beer.”

Read more.



21 September 2015
Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D.




Arab-Israeli fourth graders pray in Aramaic in 2012 at a Catholic elementary school in Jish. Israel’s Christian schools have been on strike since 1 September. (photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)

On 1 September 2015, 45 Christian schools in Israel went on strike. Consisting of 3,000 teachers and 33,000 students, the schools are considered “unofficial but recognized” by the Israeli government. Many of the schools date to the time of the Ottoman Empire and so are considerably older than the State of Israel.

The crisis and strike have been precipitated by two decisions of the Israeli government. The first decision was to cut the government funding that the Christian schools receive. Originally the state paid 70 percent of these schools’ budgets. This has now been progressively reduced — recently to 45 percent, and now to 29 percent. (The Israeli newspaper Haaretz also notes that the similarly semi-public ultra-Orthodox schools with 220,000 students are almost totally funded by the government.)

Full funding for the schools has been estimated at $52 million a year. These schools, which accept also Muslim and Druze students, are among the most effective in Israel and it is estimated that “Christian Arabs have the highest rate of success in Israel’s Bagrut (matriculation) exams, which largely determine who is admitted to a state university.” This, despite the fact that the Israeli government spends an average of 24 percent less on each high school student who is an Israeli citizen of Palestinian descent.

The second government decision was to limit the percentage of the operating costs that the schools could charge parents as tuition. Tuition was the means by which the schools attempted to fill the gaps caused by the progressive reduction of state support. Nevertheless, the Israeli government has now limited the amount parents can pay. One Christian school administrator states that the tuition cap set by the Israeli government is 2,500 Shekels ($645) per year, half of what would be needed to make up for government cuts. Thus, the Israeli government is seen as putting a double squeeze on the Christian schools by reducing their subsidies and their abilities to cover the deficits.

Negotiations have been going on between the Office of Christian Schools and the Israeli Government since May. The government has offered full funding if the schools agree to become “official and recognized.” However, this is perceived by Christian educators as an attack on their independence and a requirement not demanded of other private schools in Israel. Msgr. Giacinto-Boulos Marcusso, the patriarchal vicar of Jerusalem, sees these actions as attempts to progressively deprive young people of their identity through “ignorance, emigration or integration into national structures, the first of which is the army.”

During the third week of September the Israeli government offered the schools a subsidy of 67 million shekels (about $17.3 million). Since the costs that need to be covered amount to about to about $52 million dollars, the Board of Christian Schools refused the offer and the strike continues.



Tags: Children Israel Education Catholic education Youth

18 September 2015
Greg Kandra




Students attend a computer class at the Blessed Gebremichael Catholic School in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Learn more about their lives in “A Letter from Ethiopia” in the
Spring 2015 edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)




17 September 2015
Greg Kandra




A Caritas day care center in Tbilisi, Georgia offers classes in traditional Georgian carpet weaving, teaching new skills to young people. To learn more, read “A Child’s Rights Restored” in the
March 2012 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)




16 September 2015
Greg Kandra




Sawy Abdullah Joda makes shoes at the Jesuit Fathers’ vocational training center in Minya, Egypt. To learn more about projects bringing jobs and education to Egyptians, read “From Dust to Dignity” in the November-December 2002 edition of the magazine. (photo: Sean Sprague)



15 September 2015
Greg Kandra




The sisters at Bediani in Georgia keep bees to supplement their income. To learn more about life in their community, read “Alternative Lifestyles” in the September 2007 edition of ONE.
(photo: Justyna Mielnikiewicz)




14 September 2015
Greg Kandra




Seminarians enjoy a traditional Ethiopian meal at Holy Trinity Ethiopian Orthodox Theological College in Addis Ababa. To learn more about the training of Orthodox clergy in that part of the world, check out “As It Was, So Shall It Remain?” in the September 2009 edition of ONE.
(photo: Cody Christopulos)




11 September 2015
Greg Kandra




In this photo from 9 September, Bishop Gregory Mansour of the Eparchy of St. Maron of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Archbishop Oshagan Choloyan, the prelate of the Armenian Apostolic Church of the Eastern United States, participate in an ecumenical prayer service at St. Joseph Church on Capitol Hill opening the In Defense of Christians Leadership Convention in Washington.
(photo: CNS/Jaclyn Lippelmann)


A gathering in Washington this week called attention to the plight of Christians in the Middle East:

Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington called for solidarity with the persecuted Christians of the Middle East during a 9 September prayer service at a Roman Catholic church on Capitol Hill.

The prayer service was held in conjunction with the In Defense of Christians summit held at a Capitol Hill hotel, within walking distance of St. Joseph Church.

The summit is the second for the organization, which Cardinal Wuerl noted in his reflections during the prayer service.

“All of came together (in 2014) so the people could ... express solidarity with our brothers and sisters,” he said, “and bear prayerful witness to the suffering of so many ... especially our Christian brothers and sisters.”

This year, Cardinal Wuerl said, “we are gathered in solidarity and witness” again to support the region’s Christians who face “tragedy” every day. “Much, much needs to be said about what continues to happen in the Middle East,” he added.

“After the prayer service, we can walk out and enjoy freedom. So many of our brothers and sisters cannot do that.”

Cardinal Wuerl recalled the beatitudes, as proclaimed in English at the prayer service — but also in sung chant — by Melkite Father Nabil Haddad, founder of the Jordanian Interfaith Coexistence Research Center, and in particular, “those who hunger and thirst for righteousness.” These, the cardinal said, are today’s Middle East’s Christians.

“We know that we can offer our prayers,” he added. “Prayer helps. Prayer is effective.”

Read the rest.



10 September 2015
Greg Kandra




A resident of the Deivadan Home in Malayatoor, India, receives a blessing from 96-year-old Father Abraham Kaippenplackal, founder of the Deivadan Sisters. The sisters run the facility, whose mission is to help uplift Kerala’s abandoned elderly. To learn more, read “Fearless Grace” from the July 2010 edition of ONE. (photo: Peter Lemieux)







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