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September, 2019
Volume 45, Number 3
  
23 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Bishop Paul Hinder, apostolic vicar of southern Arabia, greets community members in the garden of St. Joseph Catholic Cathedral in Abu Dhabi. (photo: Don Duncan)

In the Spring 2016 edition of ONE, reporter Don Duncan speaks with Bishop Paul Hinder in Abu Dhabi, who describes the challenges of the Catholic community in the Persian Gulf:

ONE: Do you find working in an Arab monarchical system different from your previous work experience in Switzerland and Rome?

Bishop Paul Hinder: I come from Switzerland, a democratic culture with participation of the people, a reliable legal system and so on. In a monarchy, you suddenly have to go to the court, to the palace or to the ruler or the ruler’s representative if you need things done. That is something very strange to my heart — or it was when I started. In the meantime, I had to learn how to work within that system. What I had to learn, and I am still learning, is that living here requires patience — patience in the relationship you cannot establish in five minutes; to be seen to take care of friendships without selling your soul; to show you understand the problems in building the nation. We have to keep in mind that within the last 50 years, they were catapulted from the Bedouin lifestyle to a highly modern and technologically advanced situation, so the locals are also adapting.

ONE: The Gulf States are becoming more tolerant of Christian migrants. The number of churches is increasing. And yet, Christian religious activity is limited to defined spaces. Does this present any problems?

PH: It’s complex. We have limited space and there’s simply too much to do. What we are doing is taking the five loaves and two fish and distributing them, knowing it’s not sufficient but hoping that it will somehow multiply on the ground. The parish priest of St. Mary’s in Dubai was here a few minutes ago. He said that during nine Masses before Christmas, they had 10,000-12,000 Filipinos every evening. How do you deal with so many people? You can’t take them all for confession. On one end, it’s a pastoral opportunity, but you cannot establish individual relationships. This is one of the challenges: to meet the needs, knowing we lack the means, the manpower and the infrastructure to answer them all.

ONE: Some Catholics have mentioned that the lack of space has led to an opportunity for other churches to proselytize and convert. Is this happening?

PH: Sometimes, not having enough space means some people may prefer to go where they can move more easily: the Pentecostal community, the Anglicans, the Orthodox. There is also proselytism. Here on the compound parking area, Pentecostals or the “born-again” Christians distribute leaflets and so on. Never would I have this idea; we accept converts if they come to us freely, but we do not actively propagate Catholicism among the Protestants or the Orthodox.

Read the full interview here.



22 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Rahel Zewde, 13, is one of the many students at the St. Michael School in Awo, Ethiopia, who benefit from a daily feeding program, a program necessitated by the country’s worsening drought. Today marks the United Nations’ World Water Day, calling attention to water-related issues around the globe. Learn more about the plight of Ethiopians facing hunger and drought When Rain Fails in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)



21 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Children of the Good Samaritan Home in El Fayum, Egypt, play on a swing.
(photo: John E. Kozar)


Spring has officially arrived — and so has the Spring 2016 edition of ONE, which features a fascinating photo essay by Msgr. John E. Kozar, from his recent trip to Egypt. The image here is just one of the delights to be found in the magazine. Check out more in our digital edition.

And take a moment, too, to watch this video preview of ONE from Msgr. Kozar.




18 March 2016
J.D. Conor Mauro




Students socialize on the campus of Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv. In the nation some regard as the most corrupt in Europe, U.C.U. distinguishes itself by fostering values of service and integrity. Read more about this institution in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE. (photo: Petro Zadorozhnyy)



Tags: Ukraine Education Catholic education

16 March 2016
J.D. Conor Mauro




A mother and child suffering from malnourishment visit the clinic run by the Daughters of St. Anne in Idaga Hamus, Ethiopia. To learn more about Ethiopia’s drought and how church are responding to growing needs, read When Rain Fails, from the new Spring 2016 edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers/Panos Pictures)



Tags: Ethiopia Drought Ethiopia’s Catholic Church

15 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Pharmacist Falah Ahmad distributes medicine to displaced Iraqis from the back of the mobile clinic. The clinic, supported in part by CNEWA, is a lifeline for thousands of refugees. Read more about it in Health on Wheels in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE, now available online.
(photo: Raed Rafei)




14 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Parishioners sing Armenian hymns during the Divine Liturgy at Sts. Peter and Paul Church, which they share with the local Roman Catholic community. To learn more about Catholics in Armenia, read A Firm Faith from the Spring 2014 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)



11 March 2016
Greg Kandra




As we mark CNEWA’s 90th anniversary today, we are continually uplifted by the faith and joy of those we have met from around the world, especially the young people. Here are a few small glimmers of hope: young Syrian refugees at the Zahle camp in Lebanon in January of 2016.
(photo: John E. Kozar)




10 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Children receive oxygen at a hospital in Taza, Iraq, on 9 March, after ISIS militants fired mortar shells and rockets filled with “poisonous substances” into their village.
(photo: CNS/Stringer, Reuters)


A new report states that Christians and minorities in Iraq, Libya and Syria are victims of genocide carried out by ISIS.

CNS has details:

The 278-page document was released March 10 in Washington, a week before a congressionally mandated deadline for the Department of State to announce if genocide was being committed against religious and ethnic minorities in the Middle East and North Africa by the Islamic State.

It argues that the case for genocide exists and called on Secretary of State John Kerry to make such a declaration and to include Christians in it.

The report contains dozens of statements collected from 22 February through March 3 from witnesses and victims of atrocities carried out by Islamic State forces. The incidents include torture, rapes, kidnappings, murder, forced conversions, bombings and the destruction of religious property and monuments.

“Murder of Christians is commonplace. Many have been killed in front of their own families,” said the report, titled “Genocide Against Christians in the Middle East.”

It cites statements from religious leaders, including Pope Francis, and conclusions from the European Parliament, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom and the Iraqi and Kurdish governments, all of which have labeled the Islamic State’s actions as genocide.

The report includes a legal brief directed toward Kerry detailing the case for a genocide designation.

Read more.

Pope Francis last year condemned what he called “genocide” of Christians in part of the Middle East, noting:

“Today we are dismayed to see how in the Middle East and elsewhere in the world many of our brothers and sisters are persecuted, tortured and killed for their faith in Jesus,” he said,according to Firstpost. “In this third world war, waged piecemeal, which we are now experiencing, a form of genocide is taking place, and it must end.”



9 March 2016
Greg Kandra




People line up for confession with retired priests at a retreat center near Irinjalakuda, India. Retired priests are continuing to minister to Catholics in India. Learn how in Redefining Retirement in the March 2009 edition of ONE. (photo: Peter Lemieux)







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