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Current Issue
Summer, 2016
Volume 42, Number 2
  
4 April 2016
Greg Kandra




Greek Catholic women say a prayer in the Hungarian village of Nyírascád. To learn how Greek Catholics are maintaining the traditions, read Holding on in Hungary in the May 2006
edition of ONE. (photo: Balazs Gardi)




Tags: Eastern Europe Hungary Greek Catholic Church

1 April 2016
Greg Kandra




A Coptic villager in Upper Egypt checks his cellphone while transporting crops across town.
(photo: John E. Kozar)


CNEWA’s President, Msgr. John E. Kozar, made a memorable pastoral visit to Egypt earlier this year, and captured the deep faith of the country’s Christians in the Spring edition of ONE:

Egypt is often left out of discussions about the “Holy Land,” yet it is the land where St. Joseph took Mary and Jesus for safe haven. Sometimes the ancient history of the Pharaohs, the pyramids and the many archaeological treasures diminish the biblical importance of this land.

But Christians in Egypt, unlike in most of the Middle East, are truly at the bottom of society. Generally, they are the least educated, own very few businesses and are considered “second class,” or the outcasts of society. Many live in sprawling urban ghettoes, where many make a living picking and sorting garbage. Others live in very poor rural villages where they till the soil as indentured servants to wealthy landowners. One sister said, “They don’t dare take one head of grain to eat.” In either setting, however, their faith is alive.

Despite being extremely poor and living in horrible conditions, such as sleeping on a mud floor with their oxen and pigs, they relate to their local parish as an extended family and do everything needed to sustain each other, even to the point of taking in orphans or those children or elderly who have no one to care for them.

Read more and see his gallery of photographs here. And take a moment to hear him describe his visit in the video below.




31 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Markian Surmach shows off some of the beautiful pysanky, or decorated eggs, he sells in his Ukrainian shop in New York City. See more examples of his work, and learn how they are created, in The Colors of Easter in the March 2012 edition of ONE. (photo: Erin Edwards)



30 March 2016
Greg Kandra




A priest displays his cross tattoo, which Copts receive at baptism. See more pictures from Egypt, and read about the faith of Christians there, in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE.
(photo: John E. Kozar)




29 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Ivlita Kuchaidze, center, has survived famine, war and neglect over her 93 years in Georgia — but today lives in poverty, depending on charity to survive. Read her remarkable life story in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)



24 March 2016
Greg Kandra




In this image from 22 March, visitors pray in Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre, at the Stone of Unction or Anointing, where it is believed that the body of Jesus was prepared for burial.
(photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)




23 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Bishop Paul Hinder, apostolic vicar of southern Arabia, greets community members in the garden of St. Joseph Catholic Cathedral in Abu Dhabi. (photo: Don Duncan)

In the Spring 2016 edition of ONE, reporter Don Duncan speaks with Bishop Paul Hinder in Abu Dhabi, who describes the challenges of the Catholic community in the Persian Gulf:

ONE: Do you find working in an Arab monarchical system different from your previous work experience in Switzerland and Rome?

Bishop Paul Hinder: I come from Switzerland, a democratic culture with participation of the people, a reliable legal system and so on. In a monarchy, you suddenly have to go to the court, to the palace or to the ruler or the ruler’s representative if you need things done. That is something very strange to my heart — or it was when I started. In the meantime, I had to learn how to work within that system. What I had to learn, and I am still learning, is that living here requires patience — patience in the relationship you cannot establish in five minutes; to be seen to take care of friendships without selling your soul; to show you understand the problems in building the nation. We have to keep in mind that within the last 50 years, they were catapulted from the Bedouin lifestyle to a highly modern and technologically advanced situation, so the locals are also adapting.

ONE: The Gulf States are becoming more tolerant of Christian migrants. The number of churches is increasing. And yet, Christian religious activity is limited to defined spaces. Does this present any problems?

PH: It’s complex. We have limited space and there’s simply too much to do. What we are doing is taking the five loaves and two fish and distributing them, knowing it’s not sufficient but hoping that it will somehow multiply on the ground. The parish priest of St. Mary’s in Dubai was here a few minutes ago. He said that during nine Masses before Christmas, they had 10,000-12,000 Filipinos every evening. How do you deal with so many people? You can’t take them all for confession. On one end, it’s a pastoral opportunity, but you cannot establish individual relationships. This is one of the challenges: to meet the needs, knowing we lack the means, the manpower and the infrastructure to answer them all.

ONE: Some Catholics have mentioned that the lack of space has led to an opportunity for other churches to proselytize and convert. Is this happening?

PH: Sometimes, not having enough space means some people may prefer to go where they can move more easily: the Pentecostal community, the Anglicans, the Orthodox. There is also proselytism. Here on the compound parking area, Pentecostals or the “born-again” Christians distribute leaflets and so on. Never would I have this idea; we accept converts if they come to us freely, but we do not actively propagate Catholicism among the Protestants or the Orthodox.

Read the full interview here.



22 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Rahel Zewde, 13, is one of the many students at the St. Michael School in Awo, Ethiopia, who benefit from a daily feeding program, a program necessitated by the country’s worsening drought. Today marks the United Nations’ World Water Day, calling attention to water-related issues around the globe. Learn more about the plight of Ethiopians facing hunger and drought When Rain Fails in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)



21 March 2016
Greg Kandra




Children of the Good Samaritan Home in El Fayum, Egypt, play on a swing.
(photo: John E. Kozar)


Spring has officially arrived — and so has the Spring 2016 edition of ONE, which features a fascinating photo essay by Msgr. John E. Kozar, from his recent trip to Egypt. The image here is just one of the delights to be found in the magazine. Check out more in our digital edition.

And take a moment, too, to watch this video preview of ONE from Msgr. Kozar.




18 March 2016
J.D. Conor Mauro




Students socialize on the campus of Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv. In the nation some regard as the most corrupt in Europe, U.C.U. distinguishes itself by fostering values of service and integrity. Read more about this institution in the Spring 2016 edition of ONE. (photo: Petro Zadorozhnyy)



Tags: Ukraine Education Catholic education





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