Current Issue
Summer, 2015
Volume 41, Number 2
7 October 2015
Greg Kandra

In this image from 2007, a young couple is married in Tbilisi, Georgia. To learn more about the resurgent faith of this ancient nation, read “A Georgian Revival” in the March 2007 edition of ONE.
(photo: Molly Corso)

6 October 2015
Greg Kandra

Students play educational games at Good Shepherd Day Care Center in Addis Ababa.
(photo: Sean Sprague)

In 2007, we explored some efforts to improve the lives of women in Ethiopia — including providing day care for their children:

“It helps if we reach the kids early,” said Genet Assefa, principal of the Bethlehem Day Care Center. The center, founded by the Good Shepherd Sisters in 1987, caters to the children of Cherkos, a slum in Addis Ababa that takes its name from the neighborhood church. (The sisters run a second day care facility in Addis Ababa, the Good Shepherd Sisters’ Center.)

On a recent visit to the Bethlehem center, more than 150 children, all under 7, were fully engaged in their classes. Some recited the English alphabet: “C! C is for cat.” Others practiced Amharic, their national language.

“The center serves two purposes,” said Mrs. Assefa. “It gives these children access to an early education that they wouldn’t ordinarily have, which will encourage them to go on to primary school and beyond. And it also frees up the parents, many of whom are single mothers, so that they can try to earn a living and improve their lives.”

Improving the lives of poor young adult women is an important part of CNEWA’s mandate.

Read more about “Breaking Barriers” for women in the March 2007 edition of ONE.

5 October 2015
Greg Kandra

The Very Rev. Robert A. Buczak holds a young parishioner of St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Homestead, Pennsylvania, while some slightly older members of the flock look on. To learn more about the the American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, read the profile from the July 2006 edition of ONE. (photo: Lisa Kyle)

2 October 2015
J.D. Conor Mauro

Eritrean children under the care of religious sisters play. Eritrea has only existed as an independent nation for about a quarter of a century, but many of its various cultures and faith communities date back millennia — including the distinctive Christian traditions accounting for roughly half the population. To learn more about Christianity in Eritrea, read Ancient Church in a Young Nation, or our profile of the Eritrean Orthodox Church. (photo: John E. Kozar)

Tags: Children Africa Eritrea

1 October 2015
J.D. Conor Mauro

Nikos Voutsinos, a worker with Caritas, distributes food at a soup kitchen in Athens, Greece. To learn more about the efforts of local churches to help people through years of economic stagnation, read A Greek Tragedy from the Winter 2013 edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)

Tags: Relief Greece Economic hardships Hunger

30 September 2015
Greg Kandra

Young parishioners at Holy Cross Church in Purakkad, India, take part in perpetual adoration. Of Purakkad’s 6,500 families, some 340 belong to Holy Cross parish. Learn more about them in “Purakkad’s Natural Harmony” from the May 2009 edition of ONE. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

29 September 2015
Greg Kandra

Father Mikael Khachkalian teaches the Armenian language to children at the Armenian Catholic center in Tbilisi. To learn more about his remarkable ministry to the people of Georgia, read the profile of him in the Spring 2015 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)

28 September 2015
Greg Kandra

Today, Ethiopians celebrate the holiday of Meskel, commemorating the finding of the True Cross by St. Helena. This image from 2007 shows some of the celebration surrounding the feast in Addis Ababa. You can read more about this holiday and its meaning here.
(photo: Petterik Wiggers)

23 September 2015
Greg Kandra

A priest blesses his congregation in the Church of the Virgin Mary in Nazla, Egypt, one of the many churches burned in August 2013. Read more about Egypt’s efforts to recover in “Out of the Ashes” in the Spring 2015 edition of ONE. And join Pope Francis in bringing hope to Egypt’s Christians. Visit this link to learn how. (photo: David Degner)

22 September 2015
Greg Kandra

Palestinian Christian Nadim Khoury, master brewer and co-founder of the Taybeh Brewery Company, pours a beer at the Taybeh Oktoberfest in the West Bank village of Taybeh
on 19 September. (photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)

In 2011, we visited the town of Taybeh, “the only entirely Christian village in Palestine,” and we turned a spotlight on its annual Oktoberfest:

The family — owned Taybeh Brewery began modestly, when brothers Nadim and Daoud Khoury returned to their hometown to help rebuild the local economy. Over the next decade, the brothers worked tirelessly to improve their product and expand the business.

The Khoury family has lived in Taybeh for at least 600 years. The brothers’ grandfather served as the pastor of the local Orthodox parish. As children, they attended school in nearby Ramallah. But as young adults, conflict and the resulting dearth of educational and economic opportunities drove the brothers to set out for the United States, where they completed their studies and lived for several years.

“We came back after the Oslo Agreement. First, my brother Nadim came in 1994 and I myself followed in 1999,” says Daoud Khoury, who since 2005 has served as Taybeh’s mayor.

“I wanted to do something for my small village. It is important to me to keep Taybeh a Christian village in Palestine. I mean no prejudice, but we are surrounded by 16 Muslim villages and live with them peacefully,” explains Mayor Khoury.

“But, I and my fellow citizens feel it is a treasure that we inherited this land from our great–grandfathers. They passed down the land from generation to generation and did not sell it, even though they were probably in need back then. We feel it is our duty to preserve the land and keep Taybeh Christian.”

Since opening its doors, Taybeh Brewery has steadily earned a local and international reputation for its high quality, all–natural selection of beers, which includes a popular golden stout and nonalcoholic alternative.

Now, this year’s Oktoberfest is in full swing, and CNS dropped by:

As Palestinians and Israelis in Jerusalem once again became embroiled in violence, locals and guests in Taybeh were enjoying ice-cold beers, grilled meats, frosted doughnuts and throbbing music as the all-Christian Palestinian village celebrated its 11th Oktoberfest.

“This gathering is good,” said a beaming Nadim Khoury, who together with his brother, David, opened the village’s now-famous Taybeh microbrewery, which hosts the festival. That was in 1995, two years after Nadim Khoury returned from an extended sojourn in the United States.

“It brings unity to all the people here; they share, sell local products, drink beer, eat,” Nadim Khoury said. “We show the world we can have a normal life, we celebrate life. The Middle East always has problems; this is our peaceful resistance.”

Over the pulsating rap of a local Palestinian band, David Khoury, a former village mayor, remarked: “We brought democracy to Palestine by selling beer,” he said. “And someday we will toast peace over beer.”

Read more.

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