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Current Issue
Spring, 2015
Volume 41, Number 1
  
29 May 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2011, altar servers assist in a liturgy at Our Lady of Paradise Cathedral
in São Paulo. (photo: Izan Petterle)


In 2011, we took readers to Our Lady of Paradise in São Paulo, Brazil, spiritual home to an estimated 400,000 people — the largest Melkite Greek community not only in the Americas but in the world. It’s located in the neighborhood of Paraíso (Portuguese for paradise):

Though Paraíso remains the center of Brazil’s Melkite cultural and spiritual life, its demographics have changed dramatically in recent years. Social success and economic prosperity among first– and second–generation Melkite Arab–Brazilians have prompted most to choose more affluent residential communities in São Paulo and its sprawling suburbs.

Fortunately, some longtime residents remain to preserve the neighborhood’s historic Arabic flavor. Strolling Paraíso’s streets, one finds no shortage of Arab–owned restaurants, serving up traditional Middle Eastern cuisine, such as falafel, kibbeh, tajine and hummus. Many of these establishments so far have withstood the test of time, having remained in their families for several generations.

After the liturgy, a small group of parishioners approaches the altar and passes through a door leading to a spacious community hall. There, they gather to socialize and enjoy refreshments. The aroma of freshly brewed coffee and the sound of casual conversations in Arabic and Portuguese fill the air.

Read more about “Paradise in Brazil” in the July 2011 edition of ONE.



28 May 2015
Ra’ed Bahou




Over 30 people, including the young man pictured here, recently took part in a special day for Iraqi refugees with special needs. (photo: CNEWA)

Recently, Jordan received a large number of Iraqi refugees, especially from Nineveh plain. Through our encounters with them, we have learned more about their difficulties and sufferings, because they have been forced to leave their homes and their country. Now, they are facing significant challenges at various levels: financially, physically and psychologically.

Their enormous needs are difficult to meet; therefore, this situation invites us to reflect on Christ’s attitude toward the vulnerable and marginalized, the sick and wounded; it also invites us to feel solidarity with all our brothers and sisters who are suffering due to what happened to them. It invites us to go towards them, to participate and support them in their dignity. The church in Jordan, along with several humanitarian organizations, seeks to support and aid everyone according to their needs and abilities.

CNEWA in Amman would like to share with you a day we spent recently with our brothers and sisters, Iraqis with special needs. CNEWA, with the coordination of the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, worked and prepared for this event for more than a month. The attendees were 31 people of different ages and disabilities. They were accompanied by the same number of parents.

This event was a huge success.

Four buses traveled from Amman to Madaba to the Sermig monastery, named “Gathering House — Bait Al-Liqa’.”

On arrival, they watched a short movie about the facility; it daily receives more than 100 children with special needs. The facility offers education and rehabilitation, and provides physical and speech therapy. After the movie, participants were divided into three groups to visit with the volunteers, who explained the different activities carried out by the house according to their needs. We were all really astonished, and were deeply moved when we saw the children’s handiworks of paintings, sewing, rosaries, and mosaics.

Later on, the groups participated in activities such as gardening, coloring and making flowers; another group helped in the kitchen. Everyone was happy and enjoyed the activities. They experienced the joy of being useful, and saw that even doing something simple can have great importance and value.

Bishop Salim Sayegh, who happily responded to our invitation, concluded the morning with the celebration of the Holy Mass. In his talk, he sent a message to all attendees, a message of joy in Christ, by saying: the Easter message is to rejoice! The young and innocent children need the adults’ joy, they need to nourish on the joy of Christ. “Your innocent children,” he said, “are unaware of the problems and worries you face, so they should always have the happy image of Christ in their lives!”

We then shared lunch in a spirit of joy and love.

During the evaluation of this day, participants expressed their joy, and expressed that they are not a burden on society, but they have a lot to offer and wish that there be more attention to their situation and that such events and activities to be repeated.

This was a very emotional event for all participants; they learned from each other, they learned to trust more in God and to be more patient and persistent.

It also allowed us to meet Jesus Christ through them. We can only hope they also met him through us.



27 May 2015
Greg Kandra




Five-year-old Battoul al Hassan stands outside her family’s temporary home in Jounieh, Lebanon.
(photo: Tamara Hadi)


Two years ago, we focused on the plight of Syrians who had fled to Lebanon, and took note of the toll being a refugee was taking on children:

“The children weren’t aggressive or angry when they arrived,” says school administrator Amale al Hawa of the new Syrian students. “But they were quiet and unable to chitchat with the others. We noticed that, in most cases, they were closed in on themselves.”

Such is the case of 14-year-old Nour al Hassan. She has the body and gait of a girl but a depth and darkness in her face that suggests a young woman who has been through a lot — and she has been. With her father, Ammar, her mother, Shams, and her siblings Issa, 13, Moussa, 10, and Battoul, 5, they fled their home village of Al Houla north of the Syrian city of Homs early one morning last September. The shelling had become just too much to bear. Still, Nour misses home.

“The most difficult thing about being here is that I left everything behind,” she says. “My friends, my family, my grandparents, everyone I love. I left them there and we are alone here.”

After school, Nour and her siblings walk down the hill, pass through a chicken coop to a shack their parents have rented from a Lebanese landlord for the exorbitant price of $300 a month. When the temperature drops, they make do with blankets received from neighbors and an electric heater that barely works. Their landlord forbids them from using too much electricity.

Read more about “Crossing the Border” in the Spring 2013 edition of ONE.

And to learn how you can help Syrians under siege, visit this giving page.



26 May 2015
Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D.




A picture taken on 14 March 2014 shows a sculpture found in the ancient Syrian oasis city of Palmyra, 130 miles northeast of Damascus, and now displayed at the city’s museum. From the first to the second century, the art and architecture of Palmyra, standing at the crossroads of several civilizations, married Greco-Roman techniques with local traditions and Persian influences. (photo: Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)

Now that ISIS has gained control of Palmyra — and, some fear, could destroy many of the priceless artifacts in the ancient Syrian city — an important Muslim voice has been raised, calling on the world to protect and defend these treasures.

Al Azhar, one of the oldest universities in the world and a center of Sunni Muslim learning, has declared that “protecting archaeological sites from destruction and plundering is the battle of all humanity.” The Cairo-based institution has called on the world community to prevent ISIS from “destroying the cultural and archaeological landmarks of the city.” As one of the most authoritative voices in Sunni Islam, Al Azhar stated that the destruction of world heritages sites and artifacts is haram — that is, forbidden by Sharia law.

Al Azhar has reason to be concerned for Palmyra.

In March 2001 the Taliban shelled and destroyed the giant statues of Buddha that had been erected in the Bamiyan Valley, Afghanistan. Scholars estimate that the statues were built between 507 and 554, before the birth of Muhammad and the arrival of Islam. It was the most widely publicized destruction of antiquities in recent times.

Unfortunately the destruction of the Bamiyan Buddhas was not an isolated example of barbarism in the name of religion. Since 2001 — and with increasing frequency recently — religious extremists have been attacking artistic and ancient artifacts in the name of religion. The most notorious of these desecrators of what the U.N. calls objects of World Heritage has been the self-proclaimed Islamic State, known in the Middle East by its acronym Daesh.

The present rampage of wanton destruction of the art and history of the Middle East is unparalleled in magnitude since the Mongol invasions under Hulagu Khan in the 13th century. The Mongols destroyed Baghdad in 1258 and brought the Golden Age of the Abbasid Caliphate to an end. Ironically ISIS, which claims to have reestablished the caliphate, is behaving in the same way as those who brought the caliphate in that part of the world to an end.

With the fall of Mosul in July 2014 ISIS members sacked the Mosul Museum which had been home to many artifacts dating from the Old through the New Assyrian periods (2015-612 B.C.). While some of the plundered artifacts were sold on the black market, many of the irreplaceable objects were simply and wantonly destroyed.

The world can only hope that the voices of concern raised by Al Azhar will be heard — and heeded.



Tags: Syria Art Historical site/city ISIS

22 May 2015
Greg Kandra




The father of a man who was killed by ISIS militants in Libya earlier this year attends a service in the Virgin Mary Church near Cairo on 3 May. (photo: CNS/Reuters)



21 May 2015
Greg Kandra




Two young students take a break during class at the Armenian School inside the convent in the Old City of Jerusalem. To learn more about the lives of Armenians in this small, close-knit community, read “Living Here is Complicated” from the Winter 2014 edition of ONE.
(photo: Ilene Perlman)




20 May 2015
Greg Kandra




The sun sets on the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. The city contains architecture of one of the most important cultural centers of the ancient world. Saturday, ISIS militants seized part of Palmyra. Read more about efforts to save some of the city’s statues here.
(photo: Tibor Bognar/Getty Images)




19 May 2015
Greg Kandra




Girls play in front of Holy Cross Church in Purakkad, India, built by the Portuguese in the 15th or 16th century. To learn more about this traditional fishing village, check out “Purakkad’s Natural Harmony” in the May 2009 edition of ONE. (photo: Peter Lemieux)



18 May 2015
Greg Kandra




Traditional honey cakes, as well as souvenirs, are sold at an annual fair in Máriapócs, a little Greek Catholic village that is Hungary’s most beloved pilgrimage site, with a special devotion to Mary. To learn more, read “Hungarians Gather to Honor Mary” in the May 2005 edition of ONE.
(photo: Jacqueline Ruyak)




15 May 2015
Greg Kandra




Three families displaced by the war in Ukraine now share one small apartment in Svyatogorsk. To learn more about how the crisis in Ukraine has impacted people living there, read “Casualties of War” in the Spring 2015 edition of ONE. (photo: Ivan Chernichkin)







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