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Current Issue
Spring, 2017
Volume 43, Number 1
  
24 April 2017
Greg Kandra




A student greets a visitor at a school for children with special needs in Koonammavu, a suburb of Cochin, in Kerala. In the current edition of ONE, CNEWA’s president Msgr. John E. Kozar reflects on the Catholic Eastern churches around the world. See more images and read his essay here. (photo: John E. Kozar/CNEWA)



Tags: India Children Sisters Kerala

21 April 2017
Greg Kandra




A young child receives a checkup at the clinic administered by the Near East Council of Churches in Shajaia, a neighborhood of Gaza City. Read more about this clinic Where Hope Is Kindled in Gaza in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Tamara Abdul Hadi)



Tags: Children Gaza Strip/West Bank Health Care Eastern Churches

20 April 2017
Greg Kandra




The Didos family, one of the many Ukrainian families displaced by war, exits a Greek Catholic Church in Lviv. Read more about The Displaced in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Ivan Chernichkin)



Tags: Ukraine War Eastern Christianity

19 April 2017
Greg Kandra




Young displaced students from a variety of faiths and backgrounds sing together in Arabic in Dohuk, Iraq. For more on the displaced in Iraq, read ‘God Wants Me Here’ in the March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Paul Jeffrey)



Tags: Iraq Iraqi Christians Iraqi Refugees

18 April 2017
Greg Kandra




Children in Bangalore, India, hold Easter eggs on 16 April. (photo: CNS/Jagadeesh Nv, EPA)



Tags: India Eastern Christianity Easter

13 April 2017
Greg Kandra




Archbishop Pierbattista Pizzaballa, apostolic administrator of the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem, dries the feet of a clergyman during the foot-washing ceremony on Holy Thursday in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem’s Old City. The ritual reflects the call to imitate Christ by serving one another. (photo: CNS/Ammar Awad, Reuters)



12 April 2017
Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service




Father Michael Perry, minister general of the Franciscans, walks past the rubble of a bombarded building in Aleppo, Syria, during an early April visit to Franciscan friars there.
(photo: CNS/courtesy of the Franciscan Generalate)


Fifteen Franciscan friars continue to live and work in Syria; two of the friars minister in towns controlled by Islamic State forces.

The Rev. Michael Perry, minister general of the Franciscans, visited most of the friars the first week of April, but he could not enter areas controlled by Islamic State or by forces opposed to the government of President Bashar Assad.

He drove to Homs on 7 April, just hours after U.S. bombers attacked the nearby Shayrat air base in retaliation for the Syrian government's suspected use of chemical weapons.

“We didn’t see anything, but we certainly sensed the tension,” he told Catholic News Service in Rome on 12 April.

In Damascus, he said, he and the other friars could hear bombing “every 20 minutes, 24 hours a day” from one of the neighborhoods controlled by opposition forces. “This was constant, a constant reminder that nothing is settled; everything is still up in the air and people feel a great deal of insecurity.” The people just want it to stop, he said.

“We have two Franciscans who are caught (in territories) under ISIS control,” he said. “They are living in two villages, 25 and 40 kilometers from Aleppo. They have been able to negotiate space and pay what is necessary” in order to stay and help the estimated 300 families remaining. The families are made up mostly of the elderly, children and “those who are too poor or too weak to find another place to go.”

“The friars are staying with them and showing their solidarity and suffering the same conditions as the people,” Father Perry said. To be able to stay, they had to remove all crosses, pictures of saints and other visible signs that they are Christians.

“It’s a miracle they’ve been able to negotiate the space, but it's a testimony to the perseverance and endurance of the Syrian people,” he said. Both friars are Syrians.

Father Perry began his weeklong trip in Beirut with Franciscans helping those who have fled Syria. The rest of his trip took place by car, including long detours to avoid areas controlled by Islamic State or by opposition forces.

“All along the south and eastern side to the eastern entry into Aleppo, I did not see one town that was alive,” he said. “They had all been bombed out, abandoned.”

“The closer we got to Aleppo, we saw a few people who were beginning to farm again, but we just didn’t see any signs of life, human life,” Father Perry said. “By contrast, the fields were in full bloom with poppies and different colored flowers. So it was this stark contrast of the death of humanity and nature almost saying, ‘It’s not over. Stop. It’s going to come back. There’s still hope. There’s a future even if it doesn’t look like there’s one now.’”

At a Catholic parish in Aleppo, Father Perry brought a weighty contribution to the hope professed by parishioners, the women religious, the friars and Bishop Georges Abou Khazen, apostolic vicar for the city’s Latin-rite Catholics.

Cardinal Angelo Comastri, archpriest of St. Peter’s Basilica, had given Father Perry three of the bricks used to close up the basilica’s Holy Door between jubilee years. Father Perry took one to South Sudan, one to Malaysia and the last he brought to Aleppo "as an invitation to dialogue, reconciliation and rebuilding.”

“I’ve been in war zones for the (U.S.) bishops, I’ve been in war zones for Franciscans International, but I’ve never witnessed anything on the scale of Syria. Ever,” Father Perry said.



11 April 2017
CNEWA staff




Msgr. John E. Kozar, president of CNEWA, poses with a villager on 2 April in Batnaya, Iraq. Msgr. Kozar was on a pastoral visit to Iraq. Read more about his visit and his impressions of Iraq here.
(photo: CNEWA)




10 April 2017
Greg Kandra




Mourners attend the 10 April funeral for victims of a bomb attack the previous day at the Orthodox Church of St. George in Tanta, Egypt. Also 9 April, an explosion went off outside the Cathedral of St. Mark in Alexandria where Coptic Orthodox Pope Tawadros II was presiding over the Palm Sunday service. (photo: CNS/Mohamed Hossam, EPA)



7 April 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




An altar server carries incense through new Coptic Catholic parish community center still under construction in Izbet al Nakhl, in northern Cairo. To learn more about the lives and challenges facing Copts in Egypt’s capital, read Anxiety in Cairo in the newly published March 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: David Degner)



Tags: Egypt Coptic Catholic Church Coptic Urbanization





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