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March, 2017
Volume 43, Number 1
  
30 August 2013
Greg Kandra




Flooded with Syrian Christian refugees, Al Qaa’s Greek Catholic church in Lebanon is often filled to capacity. (photo: Tamara Hadi)

As fear of a U.S. military attack mounts, more Syrians are seeking refuge outside the country. Earlier this year, we looked at Syrian refugees fleeing into Lebanon:

Although she has only moved a few miles down the road, Hayat Qarnous wakes up to a world vastly different from the one she knew just a few weeks ago. Back then, she was living in Rableh, a village on the Syrian side of the Syria-Lebanon border and once the center of a quiet farming community. But since the Syrian uprising started in March 2011, it has been anything but peaceful.

“War is like fire,” she says, sitting in her newfound refuge in Al Qaa, a Lebanese village just across the border from Rableh. “A fire eats everything before it. So does war. There is no peace anywhere.”

It is this lack of peace, and its consequences, that have pushed more than a million Syrians to flee their homeland since the beginning of the conflict.

About 320,000 Syrians have fled to neighboring Lebanon and registered with United Nations aid agencies there. But many observers believe equal numbers of Syrians have not registered with the authorities in Lebanon; among these are an estimated 10,000 Christians.

Read more about Crossing the Border in the Spring 2013 issue of ONE.



Tags: Syria Lebanon Refugees Middle East Christians Syrian Civil War

30 August 2013
Melodie Gabriel





During our Holy Land pilgrimage a few weeks ago, we had the privilege of visiting Jerusalem’s Via Dolorosa, or “Way of Sorrows.” While the route has varied over the centuries, tradition holds that this is essentially the path Jesus travelled on his journey to Calvary.

To walk in the last footsteps of Christ while we remembered his suffering and prayed the Stations of the Cross was both memorable and moving. You can follow along as we trace Christ’s path in the video above.



Tags: Holy Land Christianity Holy Land Christians Prayers/Hymns/Saints Christian

30 August 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Iraqis in Baghdad demonstrate on 30 August against the possibility of a U.S. military strike against the Syrian government. As speculation mounted about air strikes on Syria, Western church leaders warned military intervention could lead to an escalation of hostilities. (photo: CNS/Kareem Raheem, Reuters)

Syrian civilians in desperate need as threat of U.S. strike looms (Al Jazeera) Any escalation of the Syrian crisis in response to last week’s reported chemical weapons attack will aggravate civilian suffering, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Thursday, as UNESCO warned that Syria’s rich cultural heritage is being destroyed and archaeological sites looted. Magne Barth, head of the I.C.R.C.’s delegation in Syria, said proposed Western military action would “likely trigger more displacement and add to humanitarian needs, which are already immense.” Some 2 million people have already fled Syria, including 1 million children. Human rights groups estimate that over 100,000 people have been killed since the war began. Areas plagued by heavy fighting — including the countryside around Damascus, eastern Aleppo and Deir Ezzor province — are also reeling from breakdowns of basic services such as water, electricity and garbage collection, the I.C.R.C. said…

Copts in West campaign against Muslim Brotherhood (AINA) Expatriate Copts in Western capitals launched campaigns to draw attention to the violence of the Muslim Brotherhood and to expose it as a terrorist organization, and to support the Egyptian army. “We are also angry with the bias of the western media, which still talks of the June 30 demonstrations as a coup … when over 33,000,000 citizens went out to the streets all over Egypt calling for the ousting of [Muhammad] Morsi,” said activist Mark Ebeid…

Perpetual adoration to beg for peace and stop terrorism (Fides) In the Monastery of St. James in Qarah, a city between Damascus and Homs, the resident community — an ecumenical community of 20 men and women religious of 8 nationalities and of different Christian denominations — dedicate their days to ceaseless prayer. The Rev. Daniel Maes, a Belgian Catholic priest and the community’s head, told Fides that today and in the coming days the priests and nuns would give life to a nightly Eucharistic adoration for the intention of peace…

‘We live in fear of more violence,’ says Indian Jesuit (AsiaNews) “When they march in front of our church during demonstrations organized by the Muslim Brotherhood, protesters are amazed that the building is still there,” the Rev. Bimal Kerketta told AsiaNews. Originally from India, the priest has been in Egypt for ten years working as the principal of the school run by the Jesuit Fathers in Minya. “Each day, they gather in front of the building to shout slogans of intimidation. I fear that tomorrow’s event will lead to fresh acts of violence…”

Bishop Hanna: We reject any aggression on Syria (SANA) Jerusalem’s citizens held a gathering at the courtyard of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre to express sympathy with Syria which is exposed to threats and pressures targeting its stance and national role. In a speech in front of the participants, Greek Orthodox Archbishop of Atallah Hanna of Sebastia called on all honest people to reject the foreign intervention in Syria that is planned by western countries, particularly the United States…



Tags: Egypt Syrian Civil War Monastery Indian Catholics Church of the Holy Sepulchre

29 August 2013
Greg Kandra




Israelis stand in line outside a gas mask distribution center in the northern city of Haifa on 29 August. Thousands of Israelis lined up at gas-mask distribution centers and communities bordering Syria as top government officials held emergency meetings amid fears of a possible Syrian attack on Israel. (photo: CNS/ Baz Ratner, Reuters)

The heightening tensions over a possible U.S. military attack on Syria were part of the discussion today in a meeting between Pope Francis and the king of Jordan.

Additional details, from CNS:

Dialogue and negotiations are “the only option for putting an end to the conflict and violence” in Syria, said Pope Francis and Jordan’s King Abdullah II.

As Western leaders expressed strong convictions that the Syrian government carried out a chemical weapons attack against its own citizens and vowed to take action, Pope Francis met at the Vatican 29 August with King Abdullah and Queen Rania.

Jordan borders Syria and hosts hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees who have fled the fighting that began in March 2011 in an attempt to oust President Bashar Assad.

The king and queen’s meeting with Pope Francis, who technically was still on vacation, was arranged hastily after tensions grew in the Middle East over the reported atrocities in Syria and the unrest in Egypt.

In a statement issued after the meeting, the Vatican said that the pope and king “reaffirmed that the path of dialogue and negotiation is the only option for putting an end to the conflict and violence that each day cause the loss of many human lives, especially among the unarmed population.”

Pope Francis, with an interpreter, spent 20 minutes speaking alone with King Abdullah and Queen Rania before meeting the seven members of the Jordanian delegation. The king and three aides then held a working meeting with Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, Vatican secretary of state, and Archbishop Dominique Mamberti, secretary for relations with states.

When the king arrived, Pope Francis greeted him in English, saying, “Welcome, Your Majesty.”

While reporters were present before the private meeting began, King Abdullah told the pope, “I have tremendous respect for what you are doing and for what the Catholic Church does.”

The Vatican statement said that during the meetings with the pope and with officials of the Vatican Secretariat of State, the two sides also discussed the problem of stability throughout the Middle East, Israeli-Palestinian relations and the question of the status of Jerusalem, a city sacred to Christians, Muslims and Jews.

The Vatican, the statement said, also expressed appreciation for the king’s commitment to promoting interreligious dialogue and his decision to convoke a conference in September about the challenges facing Christians in the Middle East.

Although the statement indicated a broad range of topics were touched upon, the meeting drew international attention because of the situation in Syria.

Read more at the CNS link.



29 August 2013
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis greets the king of Jordan and his wife this morning at the Vatican.
(photo: News.va/Reuters)


Pope Francis meets with King of Jordan (News.va) Pope Francis received this morning in audience the King of Jordan, Abdullah II and his wife Rania. “Welcome Majesty” were the words of welcome by Pope Francis. King Abdullah in turn welcomed the Holy Father saying that it was a pleasure and an honor to meet him, and he conveyed the greetings from his family and all the people of Jordan.” “It is an immense honor to meet you,” said also Queen Rania. King Abdullah began the conversation while stressing “the immense respect he has for what the Pope does and also for the Catholic Church.” During the cordial meeting, several topics of mutual interest were discussed, especially the promotion of peace and stability in the Middle East, the resumption of negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians, and the question of Jerusalem. A special attention was paid to the plight faced by Syria. In this regard, it was reaffirmed that the voice of dialogue and negotiation between all components of Syrian society, with the support of the international community, is the only option for ending the conflict and the violence which every day cause the loss of so many lives, especially among the population which is defenseless...

Obama says he “has not made a decision” on Syria military strike (CBS News) President Obama has not yet decided on U.S. action in Syria, where he says his administration has “concluded” President Bashar al Assad used chemical weapons in an attack against civilians last week near Damascus. “I have gotten options with our military, had extensive conversations with my national security team,” the president said Wednesday in an interview with “PBS News Hour.” “If the Assad regime used chemical weapons on his own people, then that would change some of our calculations — and the reason has to do with not only international norms but America’s own self-interest”...

Patriarch Gregorios III says U.S. strike on Syria would be “criminal” (ByzCath.org) Speaking from Damascus, the leader of the Melkite Catholic Church has told the Asia News service that an American-led assault on Syria would be “a criminal act, which will only reap more victims.” Patriarch Gregory III Laham said that the US and other Western nations have done nothing to stop an influx of “Islamic extremists from all over the world are pouring into Syria with the sole intent to kill.” Today the country desperately needs stability, he said, and “an armed attack against the government really has no sense at all”...

Christians restrain anger after church attacks in Egypt (AFP) Coptic Christians in the Upper Egyptian city of Minya are managing to restrain their anger despite a wave of devastating attacks on their churches and institutions by enraged Islamists. Tensions are still running high more than two weeks after the attacks in the city some 250 kilometres (155 miles) south of Cairo but there have been no calls for vengeance, nor any fiery rhetoric. “I say to the Islamists who attacked us that we are not afraid of their violence and their desire to exterminate the Copts,” said Botros Fahim Awad Hanna, the archbishop of Minya. “If we are not hitting back, it is not because we are afraid, but because we are sensible,” he said...

Conference on religious tolerance begins in Ethiopia (Sudan Tribune) A national conference aimed at promoting peaceful co-existence and tolerance among religious groups in Ethiopia kicked off on Tuesday in the capital, Addis Ababa. The conference, organised by the ministry of federal affairs and the Ethiopian Inter-Religious Council is being attended by some 2,500 participants from across the country. The three-day conference is being held under the theme: “We shall strive to realise Ethiopia’s renaissance through strengthening the value of religious co-existence and respecting constitutional provisions”. In his opening speech, Ethiopian prime minister Hailemariam Desalegn called on the public to remain tolerant and to join hands in battling what he called acts of extremists...



28 August 2013
John E. Kozar




Msgr. John E. Kozar, CNEWA’s president, celebrates Mass in our New York offices for the intentions of our donors. (photo: CNEWA)

This morning I offered Holy Mass in our New York office. I was joined in the celebration by my colleagues — and in spirit by our entire CNEWA family. Our purpose was to lift up the special intentions of our many generous benefactors.

I am deeply grateful to all of you who shared your prayer requests with me. Some of you asked me to pray for the soul of deceased loved ones, others for relief from an illness and still others for children who have fallen away from the church. Whatever you asked me to pray for, I carried your intention with me to altar and offered it up to the Lord.

My friends, I am thrilled to do this for you, because it is your generosity and your solidarity with the poor that makes it possible for CNEWA to fulfill the mission entrusted to us by our Holy Father.

It is a privilege to be able to join my prayers with yours during Mass, and I plan to continue doing this for your special intentions in the future. In the meantime, you are never far from my heart. Thank you for your continued generosity, your faith, and your prayerful support!



Tags: CNEWA Msgr. John E. Kozar Donors Prayers/Hymns/Saints

28 August 2013
Greg Kandra




United Nations chemical weapons experts inspect one of the sites of an alleged poison gas attack in the Damascus suburb of Mouadamiya on 26 August. The U.N. inspectors in Syria met and took samples from victims of an apparent poison gas attack in the rebel-held area. (photo: CNS/Abo Alnour Alhaji, Reuters)

Dread grips Damascus as United States mulls military strike (The Daily Star) A heavy sense of dread pervades Damascus, as Washington and its allies mull military action after alleged chemical weapons attacks by the Syrian regime outside the capital last week reportedly killed hundreds of people. Jihan is convinced the first United States strike on Syria would hit Mezzeh military airport near her Damascus home, and has already packed her family’s bags, ready to flee the capital. “They’ll hit Mezzeh, I’m sure; the target makes sense,” the young mother said of the facility, which President Bashar al Assad himself uses to travel within Syria…

Chaldean patriarch: Intervention against Syria would be a ‘disaster’ (Fides) The United States-led military intervention against Syria would be “a disaster,” according to Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans Louis Raphael I. “It would be like a volcano erupting with an explosion meant to destroy Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine. And maybe someone wants this.” The patriarch made his statement to Fides Agency with regards to his concern over the prospect of an outside attack, which seems to be imminent…

Russian Orthodox patriarchate expresses ‘strong concern’ about developments in Syria (Asia News) As a Western military intervention against the regime of Bashar al Assad appears increasingly likely, the Russian Orthodox Church expresses “strong concern” about possible developments of the crisis, this following United States charges that the regime used chemical weapons against civilians. “Once again, as was the case in Iraq, the United States is acting as an international executioner,” said Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk, head of the Department for External Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate…

Last group of Ethiopian Jews set to arrive in Israel (Jerusalem Post) The Jewish Agency is to bring the last of Ethiopia’s Jews to Israel on Wednesday afternoon with a flight of 400 Falash Mura, bringing an end to a saga that has spanned decades and seen tens of thousands of men, women and children coming to the Jewish state. Ethiopian-Israelis are planning a protest outside of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s office at the same time that a plane representing the official end of Ethiopian aliya — the immigration of Jews to Israel — is scheduled to land at Ben-Gurion Airport…



Tags: Syrian Civil War Israel Russian Orthodox Church Chaldean Patriarch Louis Raphael I

27 August 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Rev. Elias D. Mallon is a Franciscan Friar of the Atonement and CNEWA’s external affairs officer. He holds a Ph.D. in Middle Eastern languages from the Catholic University of America. (image: Currents)

Yesterday, Currents, a program on the Diocese of Brooklyn’s NET television station, aired an interview with a familiar face — CNEWA’s own Rev. Elias Mallon.

As the Mideast cauldron boils, a top church leader is cautioning that Christians always pay the highest price — scapegoats whenever trouble occurs in the area. But Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter also claims that outside countries — especially in the West — are deliberately fomenting conflicts in the region with one goal in mind — destroying the Arab World.

To gain further insight into the patriarch’s observations, our Bill Delano went to the headquarters of Catholic Near East Welfare Association, a direct Papal lifeline to the churches in the Middle East. Bill spoke with the association’s external affairs officer, Father Elias Mallon, who is also the chairman of Catholic-Muslim Dialogue for the Archdiocese of New York. Bill asked Father Mallon about what the Maronite leader said and about conditions on the ground right now.

Watch the video here.



Tags: Egypt CNEWA Copts Arab Spring/Awakening

27 August 2013
Greg Kandra




A man prays during the Sunday liturgy at the Coptic Orthodox Church of the Virgin Mary in the Maadi suburb of Cairo on 25 August. (photo: CNS/Dana Smillie)

As the situation in Egypt grows more troubled by the hour, people in the country countinue to be sustained by faith. Catholic News Service reports this morning on the country’s long and deep Christian heritage:

The Coptic Orthodox Church of the Virgin Mary sits in a tiled courtyard a few miles outside Cairo, on the left bank of the Nile as the river bends south toward Upper Egypt.

The structure’s front doors overlook the famed river, which Egyptian Christians who pray and worship here are convinced transported Mary, Joseph and their small boy, Jesus, to safety from persecution back home.

“In those times, this was a dock area from where the boats took off for Upper Egypt. The Holy Family came here from Palestine and got on one,” explained one of the church’s five priests, from an office overlooking the water.

Like the priest, many Copts — the name for Egypt’s indigenous Christians — trace their religion all the way back to Jesus who, according to the Gospel of St. Matthew, sought refuge in their country from the wrath of Herod the Great 2,000 years ago.

Coptic tradition holds that Christ stayed in Egypt for three years and that later, around the year 42, St. Mark the Evangelist also came to evangelize in the Egyptian port city of Alexandria, before being martyred there.

Christianity continued to spread among the locals called “Copts,” a derivative from the Greek word for Egypt, and by the third century, Christianity was the country’s dominant religion. By the time the newer religion of Islam arrived in Egypt in the middle of the seventh century, Egyptian Christianity had already provided the church with some of the world’s major Christian saints and had introduced new forms of monastic life.

“The history of the Coptic Church is both glorious and tragic,” wrote Otto F.A. Meinardus in his authoritative book on Egyptian Christianity, “Christians in Egypt.” …

Tension between Egypt’s Copts and Muslims has long been a problem, but recently it has dangerously spiked, first since President Hosni Mubarak’s overthrow by popular revolt in 2011, and even more so since the military’s July 3 ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi.

Morsi was aligned with the Muslim Brotherhood, whose members the Egyptian military is now pursuing.

Violence has surged even further since 14 August, when security forces raided two pro-Morsi protest camps in Cairo, which killed hundreds of people, most of them protestors.

Church leaders and independent human rights groups have recorded attacks on dozens of churches, schools, buildings, homes and other institutions belonging to Christians. Some non-Christian institutions have also come under attack in the violence, including government and security offices.

Read more.

And visit this page to learn how you can help CNEWA to help Egypt’s Christians.



Tags: Egypt Violence against Christians Coptic Orthodox Church Egypt's Christians

27 August 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Men make homemade masks for protection against chemical attacks in the Damascus suburb of Zamalka in Syria on 23 August. Pope Francis denounced the atrocities in Syria, calling again for all sides to end to the fighting. (photo: CNS/Hadi Almonajed, Reuters)

Aleppo Christians fear Iraq-style ethnic cleansing (Al Monitor) It would be accurate to describe some areas of Aleppo as “Christian,” although this by no means implies any sort of self- or externally imposed segregation or discrimination. Residents of other faiths are found, and get along in those areas. Christians have enjoyed a large degree of social and religious freedom under the current regime. It is this unique identity and way of life that will most likely be the first victim of a rebel victory. With some rebel groups being largely made up of extremist Islamists and Al Qaeda affiliates, it is not such a stretch to deduce that Christians in Syria may suffer the same fate as they did in Iraq. For these reasons, one is likely to find young Christian men in Aleppo taking up arms and manning checkpoints to defend themselves…

Prayer and fasting for missing Jesuit in Syria (Fides) At the monastery of St. Moses the Ethiopian in Syria, 27 August, the eve of the liturgical feast of St. Moses, will be marked by prayer and fasting for the release of Father Paolo Dall’Oglio and for peace in Syria. This was reported to Fides Agency by Father Jacques Mourad, head of this historic monastic community of Syrian Catholics, re-founded in 1982 by Father Dall’Oglio. Over the years, the monastery opened its doors to accommodate members of other Christian denominations and launched a joint ecumenical spiritual community, which promotes dialogue between Christianity and Islam…

Syrian bishop warns intervention could spark ‘world war’ (AINA) A Syrian Chaldean Catholic bishop on Monday warned that an armed intervention in Syria could unleash a “world war,” while the Vatican’s official newspaper called for more “prudence” from Western powers. “If there is an armed intervention, that would mean, I believe, a world war. That risk has returned,” Bishop Antoine Audo of Aleppo told Vatican radio. “We hope that the pope’s call for real dialogue between the warring parties to find a solution can be a first step to stop the fighting,” he said…

Chaldean patriarch to Kurdistan Christians: Don’t sell your homes (Fides) Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans Louis Raphael I urged Christians of Iraqi Kurdistan to “cling to their villages” and not to sell the houses and lands passed down from their fathers. Iraqi Kurdistan, traditionally considered a safe place for Christians, has become just “the last stop” in Iraq for many seeking to emigrate abroad…

Indian diocese works to fight human trafficking (Fides) Human trafficking, mainly of women and girls, is one of the most serious violations of human dignity and human rights. Alarmed by the increase in cases of trafficking and exploitation of tribal girls, the Diocese of Ranchi in Jharkhand, northeastern state of India, has initiated a program aimed at protecting health, economic and social integration of the most vulnerable individuals. The project covers 30 villages in the district of Bero, about 20 miles west of Ranchi…



Tags: Syrian Civil War Iraqi Christians Emigration Indian Catholics human trafficking





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