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Current Issue
Winter, 2013
Volume 39, Number 4
imageofweek From the Archive
In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
13 October 2011
Michael J.L. La Civita




Brother Donald Mansir (right) and Father Denis Madden review the progress of the restoration of the great dome at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. (photo: Joel Fishman)

An important member of the CNEWA family, Brother Donald Mansir, F.S.C., died early last Saturday in Walnut Creek, California. He was 62.

A brother of the De La Salle Brothers of the Christian Schools and a knight of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, Brother Donald joined CNEWA in 1989 as the field projects coordinator for the Pontifical Mission’s Jerusalem office. In 1990, he became its associate director, and later that year, he was named office director. As such, Brother Donald supervised the expansion of the agency’s programs and services in Palestine and Israel, earning respect for his balanced but strong advocacy for justice and peace issues throughout the Holy Land. In 1993, he succeeded Sister Maureen Grady, C.S.C., as chief operating officer and vice president of the Pontifical Mission.

Brother Donald was instrumental in the restoration of the dome of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem. Working with CNEWA’s Msgr. Robert Stern and (then) Father Denis Madden, he brought together the shrine’s Armenian Apostolic, Greek Orthodox and Latin Catholic custodians with concerned donors in the United States anxious about the dome’s structural integrity. To learn more about this “Turning Point for Christendom,” read Brother Donald’s own account published in CNEWA’s magazine in 1996. A year later, Father Denis Madden (now an auxiliary bishop in the Archdiocese of Baltimore) reflected on this historic moment engineered by this agency of the Holy See.

Brother Donald was more than just an efficient colleague. He was a wise boss and a good friend. He counseled patience, urged clarity and oozed elegance. He was a “cool cat” who believed the church had responsibility for all the people of God, not just a selected few. May the Lord reward Donald for the souls he touched with dignity, grace, love — and wit.



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