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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
31 August 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2007, a teacher leads a class at the Holy Trinity College in Addis Ababa.
(photo: Cody Christopulos)


With many heading back to school these days, some of those returning to the classroom are seminarians. In 2007, we looked at how one college in Ethiopia is preparing the next generation of priests:

The college hosts both full-time and part-time students (there are currently about 400 enrolled) and offers a bachelor’s degree in theology, a diploma of theology and a certificate in church management and administration. There are courses also found in secular institutions — foreign languages, statistics, philosophy and sociology — as well as classes in theology, liturgy and other areas of religious studies.

Many of the students have been educated previously in government schools. “From first to twelfth grade, I went to government schools,” said Mulugetta Dabi, a fifth-year student in his final year at Holy Trinity. By the time he was in sixth grade, he knew he wanted to be a priest in his hometown of Nazret, so he came to Holy Trinity.

In contrast, Sisay Wgayehu came to Holy Trinity only after his attempts to enroll at secular universities, including an Australian college, failed. “But once I came here, I was happy. When Addis Ababa University [later] offered me a spot, I turned them down.”

When they graduate, most students scatter across the country, often serving parishes in small villages. A few stay on and teach at Holy Trinity. The new generation of students will not only enliven the church at home, but will also help forge ties abroad, Mr. Dabi said.

Read more about Ethiopians moving “Into the Future” in the November 2007 edition of ONE.