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Current Issue
December, 2017
Volume 43, Number 4
  
22 August 2016
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2012, Ukrainian Catholic Bishop Richard S. Seminack of the Chicago-based Eparchy of St. Nicholas, left, is seen at the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome.
(photo: CNS/Paul Haring)


Late last week, it was announced that a prominent figure in the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church had died:

His Grace Bishop Richard Stephen (Seminack) 74 fell asleep in the Lord 16 August 2016.

After a prolonged battle with cancer, he died at Alden Poplar Creek Rehabilitation Center in Hoffman Estates, IL.

The priests, deacons and the staff of the Saint Nicholas Eparchy extend condolences to his family, friends, parishioners and all whose life he touched!

Please remember Bishop Richard in your prayers.

May his memory be eternal!

From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

“He was an exceptional pastor,” said Stefan Soroka of the Ukrainian Archeparchy of Philadelphia. “He was loved by his people.”

Bishop Seminack oversaw a small flock of about 10,000 in 46 parishes and missions in a territory stretching from Michigan to the Pacific. Ukrainian Catholics follow the Byzantine rites used by Orthodox Christians but are also loyal to papal authority and Catholic dogma.

Going from a beloved parish priest to taking on the administrative duties of a bishop was challenging at times, Archbishop Soroka said.

He had to navigate questions of how much to maintain Ukrainian language and culture in the parishes and how much to use English, adapt to American culture and reach out to the wider public.

“You’re never going to win on that one,” Archbishop Soroka said. “Someone’s going to be upset.” But “if somebody criticized him, he just listened. He didn’t hold malice.”

Richard Stephen Seminack was born in Philadelphia on 3 March 1942, the son of Raymond and Anna Seminack and the grandson of immigrants from Ukraine. The oldest of seven children, he attended Catholic schools and earned degrees from the Catholic University of America and the Pontifical Oriental Institute for Eastern Christian Studies in Rome, studying canon law in both places.

He served at numerous parishes and other settings in eastern Pennsylvania and Florida before serving at Holy Trinity in Carnegie from 1984 to 2003.

“He was just a nice man, a down-to-earth gentleman,” Mr. Zorey said.

Mr. Zorey recalled that at events such as his daughter’s wedding and father-in-law’s funeral, then-Rev. Seminack listened closely to learn about those involved and worked those details into his homilies.

After being appointed as bishop, Rev. Seminack told the Post-Gazette: “My ministry has always been one of openness and accountability. I have said from the first day that I was ordained that I have lived in Macy’s window. Everybody’s problem was my problem and my problem was everybody else’s problem.”

For funeral details, check this link.

“Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him…”



Tags: United States Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church