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Current Issue
Winter, 2016
Volume 42, Number 4
  
13 February 2017
CNEWA staff




In this image from December, Jordanian mourners carry the coffin of Ibrahim Bashbsha during his funeral in Karak. He was one of 14 people, including a Canadian tourist, killed in an attack by terrorists linked to ISIS. (photo: Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

CNEWA’s national director in Canada, Carl Hétu, last week published a reflection in the Canadian edition of Huffington Post. The topic: violence and the quest for peace in the Middle East.

An excerpt:

On a daily basis, the news is saturated with reports of violence around the world.

Although it wasn’t covered widely in Canadian media, in recent months, a Canadian tourist, along with 13 Jordanians, was killed by terrorists in Karak, Jordan. According to reports, the terrorists’ real plan was to attack the local Catholic Church on Christmas Day.

As Canadian National Director of the Catholic Near East Welfare Association, I visited Jordan in January. There, I joined a small group of Catholics and Muslims deeply shaken by this event to pray where the Canadian tourist was killed. The question on everyone's mind was: Why? Why did six young men from the Karak region decide to join the Islamic State and attack their own families, friends and neighbours? This is a first in Jordan, the most peaceful country in the Middle East.

On other trips I took this past year to the region, I also met Muslims and Christians from Gaza, Syria and Iraq who have experienced the worst atrocities imaginable. They, too, ask: why?

Back in Canada, the shooting at a mosque in Quebec City was a rude awakening, as the violence we see unfolding far away is now too close for comfort. Ironically, these victims came to Canada to escape violence and to live in security and freedom.

On January 30, I joined 300 Muslims and Christians who gathered at the Gatineau mosque. At the invitation of Archbishop Paul-André Durocher Catholics and Muslims started talking to each other — embracing, shaking hands and some even hugging — to find human beings that needed one another in this time of crisis. Once again, people asked why.

The reasons are multiple and complex, but at the root of it all, our world has changed in the last 30 years and we face many unresolved issues.

Read the rest.