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March, 2018
Volume 44, Number 1
  
24 January 2012
Greg Kandra




Pope Benedict XVI greets the crowd after praying the Angelus from the window of his apartment overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, 22 January. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

Following its custom, the Vatican released the pope’s annual message for World Communications Day today — the Memorial of St. Francis de Sales, patron of writers and journalists.

This year, Pope Benedict XVI chose to focus on an important aspect of communication that he says is "often overlooked": silence.

An excerpt:

By remaining silent we allow the other person to speak, to express him or herself; and we avoid being tied simply to our own words and ideas without them being adequately tested. In this way, space is created for mutual listening, and deeper human relationships become possible. It is often in silence, for example, that we observe the most authentic communication taking place between people who are in love: gestures, facial expressions and body language are signs by which they reveal themselves to each other. Joy, anxiety, and suffering can all be communicated in silence — indeed it provides them with a particularly powerful mode of expression. Silence, then, gives rise to even more active communication, requiring sensitivity and a capacity to listen that often makes manifest the true measure and nature of the relationships involved. When messages and information are plentiful, silence becomes essential if we are to distinguish what is important from what is insignificant or secondary. Deeper reflection helps us to discover the links between events that at first sight seem unconnected, to make evaluations, to analyze messages; this makes it possible to share thoughtful and relevant opinions, giving rise to an authentic body of shared knowledge. For this to happen, it is necessary to develop an appropriate environment, a kind of ‘eco-system’ that maintains a just equilibrium between silence, words, images and sounds.

The process of communication nowadays is largely fuelled by questions in search of answers. Search engines and social networks have become the starting point of communication for many people who are seeking advice, ideas, information and answers. In our time, the internet is becoming ever more a forum for questions and answers — indeed, people today are frequently bombarded with answers to questions they have never asked and to needs of which they were unaware. If we are to recognize and focus upon the truly important questions, then silence is a precious commodity that enables us to exercise proper discernment in the face of the surcharge of stimuli and data that we receive. Amid the complexity and diversity of the world of communications, however, many people find themselves confronted with the ultimate questions of human existence: Who am I? What can I know? What ought I to do? What may I hope? It is important to affirm those who ask these questions, and to open up the possibility of a profound dialogue by means of words and interchange, but also through the call to silent reflection, something that is often more eloquent than a hasty answer and permits seekers to reach into the depths of their being and open themselves to the path towards knowledge that God has inscribed in human hearts.

Read the whole message, “Silence and Word: Path of Evangelization,” at the Holy See’s news website.

World Communications Day is celebrated on the Sunday before Pentecost, which this year will be 20 May. It’s the only worldwide celebration called for by the Second Vatican Council. You can find out more about it here.



Tags: Pope Benedict XVI Vatican