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Current Issue
December, 2017
Volume 43, Number 4
  
4 October 2017
Greg Kandra




Embed from Getty Images
Father Tom Uzhunnalil, freed last month after over a year in captivity in Yemen, will receive the Mother Teresa Award for Social Justice in Mumbai. (photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)

Kidnapped Indian priest to get Mother Teresa award (Vatican Radio) Father Tom, recently freed after 18 months captivity in Yemen, has been named this year’s recipient of the Mother Teresa Award for Social Justice by Harmony Foundation Mumbai. Abraham Mathai, founder of Harmony Foundation said Father Tom exemplifies the year’s theme “Compassion Beyond Borders — a compassionate response to the refugee crisis.” Father Tom he said continued to work at a place of great danger despite having had the chance to leave the country...

Kurdish referendum could imperil Christian safe haven in Iraq (National Catholic Register) The Kurdish referendum vote for independence from Iraq has raised the specter of all-out war that, Middle East Christian leaders and advocates warn, could land the final blow to the future of Christianity in its historic Mesopotamian homeland...

Russia says airstrips wounded Al Quaida leader in Syria (AP) Russia’s military announced on Wednesday that it has carried out airstrikes in Syria this week that critically wounded the leader of the country’s al-Qaida-linked group and killed 12 other militant commanders...

Archeologists believe they have discovered tomb of St. Nicholas (The Telegraph) Archaeologists in Turkey have made a discovery which could settle a century-old debate ... and disappoint millions of children around the world. They have unearthed what they say is likely the tomb of the original Santa Claus, or Saint Nicholas, beneath an ancient church in Demre, southern Turkey...

The town that gave Russia its name (BBC) One hundred years ago, revolution flung Russia from the imperialist era into the communist era — from centuries of tsars to red Soviet stars. In St Petersburg, extravagant palaces recall the lavish lifestyles of the Russian emperors, while in Moscow, austere skyscrapers are reminders of the stark existence under dictatorial rule. Even though it’s been a century since Russians found themselves at the crossroads between these two major phases of their nation’s history, many are still at odds with one another over which period — and which city — had the greatest impact on today’s Russian culture and sparked citizens’ profound patriotism...