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Current Issue
June, 2018
Volume 44, Number 2
  
28 February 2018
Greg Kandra




Tourists place candles outside the locked doors of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem’s Old City. The church, the holiest site for Christians, reopened on 28 February after a dispute over property taxes. (photo: CNS/Debbie Hill)

Church of Holy Sepulchre reopens (CNS) Christian leaders in the Holy Land announced they would reopen the Church of the Holy Sepulchre on 28 February after the Israeli government has set up a negotiating team to resolve a municipal dispute over property taxes...

Pope prays for Syria at General Audience (Vatican News) The Pope was greeting pilgrims and visitors from Syria, the Holy Land and the Middle East present at the General Audience on Wednesday, when he improvised yet another appeal for what he called that “martyred nation.” “We must pray for these brothers and sisters of ours,” he said, “and for all persecuted Christians”...

Ethiopian Jews threaten hunger strike (AP) Representatives for thousands of Ethiopian Jews announced Wednesday they will stage a mass hunger strike if Israel eliminates funding to allow them to join their families in that country. Hundreds gathered at a synagogue in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, to express concern that Israel’s proposed budget removes the funding to help them immigrate to reunite with relatives...

Meet a family that has tattooed Christians in Jerusalem for 700 years (The Federalist) Buried in a maze of alleyways in the Old City of Jerusalem near Jaffa Gate stands a small shop with a sign that reads, “Razzouk Tattoo: Tattoo with Heritage Since 1300.” The Razzouk family has been tattooing for 700 years. When the family moved to Israel from Egypt, they brought their tattooing tradition with them. Ever since then, the Razzouks have been providing tattoos for Christians in Israel as certificates of their pilgrimage...

In Jordan, a classroom for refugees built by refugees wins architecture award (TheirWorld.org) The building, which has won a global architecture award, was constructed in Jordan’s Za’atari village and is designed to cope with high and low temperatures. It looks like a giant beehive — but this amazing structure is a school for refugees built by refugees. The dome was constructed as a classroom for children in the village of Za’atari, near the huge Syrian refugee camp of the same name in Jordan...