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Spring, 2014
Volume 40, Number 1
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In this 1996 image, children attend a festival in New York celebrating Greek heritage. (photo: Karen Lagerquist)
  
5 June 2013
Megan Knighton




Msgr. Kozar speaks with Joseph Hester, Esq., of New York City. (photo: CNEWA)

Msgr. John Kozar and the CNEWA staff welcomed local members of the CNEWA family to our New York office this morning.

After celebrating Mass for our guests, Msgr. Kozar hosted a reception that focused on CNEWA’s work in Ethiopia and Eritrea. Msgr. Kozar shared his reflections and stories of his recent trip to the region, and highlighted the agency’s work and goals for the peoples and churches there.

Thank you to everyone who attended this morning — and thank you, especially, for supporting our good works in the Horn of Africa!

Msgr. Kozar shares his reflections of his pastoral visit to the Horn of Africa. (photo: CNEWA)



Tags: CNEWA Africa Donors CNEWA Canada CNEWA Pontifical Mission
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13 February 2013
John E. Kozar




Today we begin the holy observance of Lent. As we enter into this penitential season, I want to share a few thoughts with you. Please take a moment to watch the video below:



Lent is a wonderful opportunity to renew your body and spirit, and to place yourself in service before the Lord and his church. I pray my words help you on your Lenten journey — and stir you to make a generous gift for the Eastern Catholic churches and their ministry to the poor.

You can offer your Lenten dedication to CNEWA here.



Tags: CNEWA Poor/Poverty Donors CNEWA Pontifical Mission
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14 May 2012
Erin Edwards




A Muslim mother receives care for her newborn at the Mother of Mercy Clinic in Zerqa, Jordan, which is run by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena. (photo: John E. Kozar )

Yesterday, many of us in the U.S. celebrated the mothers in our lives for Mother’s Day.

With the help of CNEWA, one place where mothers are getting a lot of support is Jordan. At the Mother of Mercy Clinic in Zerqa, Jordan, mothers receive care both before and after their children are born. The clinic, run by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena, serves predominantly Muslim patients. It’s here where young women get the help they need in taking the first steps to begin motherhood. CNEWA has supported the clinic for many years. In 2011, the clinic saw an increase of 4,159 new patients.

To learn more about the clinic, check out Mothering Mercies, an article from the May 2009 issue of ONE.



Tags: Children Jordan Health Care CNEWA Pontifical Mission
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28 March 2012
Erin Edwards




A Syrian boy and other refugees who fled the violence in Syria are seen at a temporary shelter in a school in the Wadi Khaled area of northern Lebanon 7 March.
(photo: CNS /Jamal Saidi, Reuters)


Yesterday, the Vatican announced that Pope Benedict XVI has decided that the Holy Thursday collection at the Basilica of St. John Lateran, the cathedral of the Diocese of Rome, will be used to offer humanitarian aid to Syrian refugees. The situation in Syria has resulted in the exodus of Christians from the region. Many are finding refuge in surrounding Middle East countries like Turkey and Lebanon. Earlier this month the Catholic News Service interviewed Ra’ed Bahou, our regional director for Jordan and Iraq, about how what's happening in Syria reflects a changing Middle East:

“The same pattern like in Iraq is re-emerging, as Islamic militants are now kidnapping and killing Christians in Syria,” said Issam Bishara, vice president of the Pontifical Mission and regional director for Lebanon and Syria. “Christians are concerned about the repercussions of the events taking place in the region. They fear that the experiences of Iraq and Lebanon — which took place against the backdrop of a civil war — could play out again in their own lands. These concerns haunt the Syrian Christians.”

“We lost Christians in Iraq; if we lose (them) in Syria what will happen to Christians in the Middle East?” said Ra’ed Bahou, the Pontifical Mission’s regional director for Jordan and Iraq. “Christians are leaving the region, and we have to work to reduce this loss. Time is not with us. (Syria) is the last castle of Christianity in the Middle East. If they start emigrating from Syria, it is the beginning of the end of Christianity in this area.”

In a March 7 telephone interview with Catholic News Service, Bahou said there are no official statistics, but an estimated 200 Christians were among the recent wave of Syrian refugees entering Jordan. He said many of those same refugees earlier had fled Iraq for Syria.

“They are refugees from one country to another. It is everywhere now, not just in Jordan. Also in Lebanon and Turkey. This population movement is also creating a changing Middle East,” Bahou said.

For more read, Syrian Christians Fear Persecution. To learn how you can help Syrians, visit our website.



Tags: Syria Middle East Refugees Pope Benedict XVI
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15 February 2012
Erin Edwards




Hana Habshi sits in the unfinished St. Charbel’s Maronite Catholic Church in the village of Deir El Ahmar, Lebanon. (photo: Laura Boushnak)

In the January 2012 issue of ONE, Don Duncan reported on water scarcity in Lebanon and how CNEWA’s operating agency in the Middle East, the Pontifical Mission, is helping to remedy the problem as well as empower the beneficiaries, such as Hana Habshi pictured above:

The project has jump-started the local economy and is helping to revitalize Deir El Ahmar. Residents have pooled money to build a new church dedicated to St. Charbel. Still under construction, the Maronite church stands on a once desolate lot. Now, a lush, landscaped lawn and garden cover the grounds. On summer afternoons, locals often gather on the cool lawn in the shadows of the church to relax and take refuge from the sun’s sweltering rays.

“Water has brought us back to the lands,” says Mr. Habshi. “It has breathed life back into the community, and now it assures the completion of our church. What’s more, now I can afford to move back from Beirut and retire here.”

The reservoir is just one of many water projects the Pontifical Mission has spearheaded in Lebanon since 1993, when it became a key nongovernmental partner in the country’s post-war reconstruction. In the early days, the agency focused on restoring damaged water systems in rural communities, to ensure clean drinking water as well as to irrigate farms. In recent years, projects also include water collection and sewage treatment.

For more, read Springs of Hope in Lebanon featured in our January 2012 issue.



Tags: Lebanon CNEWA Middle East Water Church
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7 February 2012
Greg Kandra




Sister Mariam Almiron of the Sisters of the Incarnate Word spins a small child around following Sunday Mass at the Holy Family Catholic Parish in Gaza. There are only about 3,000 Christians in Gaza, of which a little more than 200 are Catholic.
(photo: CNS/Paul Jeffrey)


As a small minority in many countries of the Middle East, Christians often face great challenges. Last summer Sami El-Yousef, regional director of CNEWA-Pontifical Mission for Palestine and Israel, paid a visit to Gaza to see how the Christian community there is faring:

Life in Gaza is not easy. While the government there tolerates Christian institutions and the Christian presence, it is clear that adopting a more conservative Islamic way of life does conflict at times with the more open society these Christian institutions and individuals are accustomed to.

There is an uneasy balance that seems to be maintained and holding thus far. It is certainly not easy for a teenage girl who follows a literary Tawjihi stream and finishes tenth grade and has no option but to complete her high school education in the public school system and finds herself being veiled to go to school. Neither it is easy for college-age females who are locked up in Gaza due to the blockade and want to get a college education and have no choice other than the Gazan universities and again must be veiled to go to classes. This also applies to men and women, boys and girls engaged in joint sports activities at the local YMCA who feel that they are under the watchful eye of a conservative class that does not approve of gender integrated activities.

There are other trivial matters that affect Christians, too, such as the Muslim ban on the consumption of alcohol and tobacco. These may be little inconveniences and some of them actually may be good for you, but these are additional restrictions Christians have to deal with on top of the pressures and restrictions of the occupation and the blockade. There are no easy answers, but one needs to be aware of the difficulties of daily life in Gaza, especially to the Christian community, and to appreciate the need to strengthen the Christian institutions and the Christian presence. There are many possibilities for assistance, and we hope to be able to fundraise and implement some of the projects in the near future.

After all, Christian institutions promote Christian values of worship, love, respect, honesty, humility, hope, forgiveness, compassion, integrity and self discipline among others. Gaza can only be a better place if these values are ingrained in society, and what better way to do this other than to strengthen the Christian institutions and empower them to continue to provide their services to all Palestinians alike with these values in mind.

You can read much more here. And visit our website to learn how you can join CNEWA and support Christians in the Middle East.



Tags: Middle East Christians Middle East Gaza Strip/West Bank
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19 December 2011
John E. Kozar




In an aerial view of the Christian Quarter of Jerusalem you can see the domes of the Church of the Holy Selpulchre. (photo: George Martin)

My first visit of the day was to meet with our staff in Jerusalem. They were all waiting to greet me and certainly made mefeel most welcomed and at home. As I was introduced by Sami, our regional director, I went around to all the offices and took photos of the team.

We had a great meeting together and this afforded me an opportunity to introduce myself and share with them some of my goals we would pursue together down the road. It was also rewarding to listen to each one tell me of their work; Sami obviously sets a very collaborative tone with them and they work well as a family.

From this most satisfying office visit, we walked to the offices of His Beatitude Patriarch Torkom II of the Armenian Apostolic Church in Jerusalem. He received us most cordially and immediately offered me his prayerful bestwishes. He was most charming in our visit. He is 93 years young and has been patriarch for two decades. Among his many accomplishments was a proficiency in athletics; he’s a great hiker and musician, and proud of the fact that he lived more than 20 years in the United States, including California, New York and Chicago. For a man of his age, he had amazing recall of many details of his career.

Joining us was Archbishop Aris Shirvanian, who directs the patriarchate's ecumenical and foreign relations outreach. He, too, was most cordial and shared more details about the patriarch and the richness of his long life.

I thanked the patriarch and he asked when I would be coming back for my next visit. He was gracious in giving us a blessing as we said goodbye.

From this visit, we headed to a busy market area and found the entrance to the Wujoud Center, a facility that offers training and empowerment for Palestinian women, especially Christian women. There are training and employment opportunities in classic Palestinian embroidery, cooking, painting, woodworking and a whole variety of self-help skills. The center is run by a dynamic lady named Nora Kort, who is the embodiment of a community organizer and advocate. She is a real charmer, an elegant woman who does not like to take “no” for an answer. We have collaborated with her on a number of programs and the partnership is most fulfilling on both sides, as affirmed by both Nora and Sami.

She introduced us to about a dozen ladies. Some work with her as community leaders in the walled city of Jerusalem or benefit from the center's many programs. Some of the women, including a few Muslim ladies, told their stories of how they were able to secure employment and a new lease on life through the participation in programs at this center.

And of course, there was food, plenty of it in the form of a banquet lunch — all homemade Palestinian dishes. We expressed our gratitude to the ladies and both Nora and I reaffirmed our commitment to collaborate in supporting these self-help programs geared to help the Palestinian Christians remain in their hometown of Jerusalem.

From our big lunch, we went to the offices of the Coptic Orthodox Metropolitan and Vicar of Jerusalem, His Grace Anba Abraham. Although the archbishop has some challenges with his vision, he was a most congenial and humorous host. His wit was very sharp and he expressed his faith-filled thoughts to us, sometimes with humor and a hearty laugh.

When I was asking him how he is able to work in the midst of so much conflict, strident personalities and social, cultural and religious divisions, he gave a great answer: “Monsignor, it is no different than a bishop or a pastor in one parish or diocese having to work with his neighbors in other parishes or dioceses.” He also affirmed that everything is in God's hands.

After a good visit, we tried to go on to our next appointment, but Anba Abraham insisted we stay awhile longer and have something to eat or drink. I think he really enjoyed our visit and he, too, pressed me about when I would be back to visit again.

By the way, I have to make a comment about Father Guido. Everywhere we go in the Old City, people come up to him with a warm greeting: “Abuna Guido!” and give him a big hug. I asked him if he was running for mayor of Jerusalem, he is so very well known and beloved by so many people here.

Our final visit of the day was with Patriarchal Vicar of Palestine Bishop William Shomali. As the only Palestinian bishop in the Holy Land, he is entrusted with the spiritual care of the Palestinian people in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza, the areas that make up what is Palestine, at least unofficially.

The bishop was actually standing in for the Latin patriarch, who was called to Jordan yesterday and could not see us today. However, we are having dinner with him on Wednesday, and I will be spending much of Saturday with him, as I have the honor of accompanying him in a procession to Bethlehem for the Mass of Midnight for the Christmas celebrations. Of course, there will be much more on this privilege after it happens.

I just had a first look at the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre, the site of the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus. Of course, I will have time later in the week to visit there and the other principle holy sites and I will be sure to share all ofthat with you.

I continue to remember all of you in my prayers as I live out the biblical stories in my pilgrimage.



Tags: Middle East Jerusalem
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2 September 2011
Christopher Boland




Every now and then, we hear stories of how CNEWA has been able to help people in surprising, sometimes unexpected ways. This week, we heard about one case — involving three countries, one young woman and one generous family.

Eighteen-year-old Zeina Nasraween from Jordan suffers from cerebral palsy, which severely impaired her legs and hands.

In October 2010, her family approached CNEWA’s regional office in Amman for help in securing affordable housing in Germany, where she would undergo several months of medical treatment. In response, Father Guido Gockel, CNEWA’s vice president for the Middle East, contacted a family in the Netherlands, who paid for the family’s stay in Germany.

After arriving in Germany, Zeina underwent reconstructive surgery on both her legs and received nearly six months of intensive physical therapy.

The result: last month she was able to return home to Madaba, Jordan able to walk without a cane and use her hands fully for the first time in her life.

Family, friends and colleagues greeted her when she came home, and were astounded by the improvements. “We didn’t realize how tall Zeina was before because she could never fully stand on her own. Now that she can stand and walk, we have discovered that she is quite tall,” said her sister, Nisreen.



Tags: CNEWA Jordan Amman
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