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September, 2017
Volume 43, Number 3
  
22 January 2013
Greg Kandra




Seniors play chess and backgammon in a Yerevan, Armenia, park. (photo: Armineh Johannes)

Four years ago, we took readers to Armenia, for a glimpse at some of the challenges facing many of the elderly:

The income gap in Armenia has widened and poverty remains widespread. Armenia’s most vulnerable citizens, children, the disabled and the elderly, have experienced a decline — at times dramatic — in the quality of their lives.

Most senior citizens depend on pensions to survive. And though the average pension has increased by $10 over the last five years, the cost of living has risen, mitigating the effectiveness of any increase. Today a typical pension pays a third of what is considered necessary for the average person to maintain the minimum standard of living in Armenia.

“The problem with raising pensions is quite difficult,” said Anahit Gevorgian, who heads the Elderly Issues Division in the Ministry of Labor and Social Issues. “Paying higher pensions is impossible in a country with widespread unemployment.

“Today there is just 0.9 worker for every pensioner, when there should be at least two workers to pay for one person’s pension.” About 11 percent of Armenia’s citizens are 65 or older.

Read more about Pensioners in Crisis in the January 2008 issue of ONE.



Tags: Armenia