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Current Issue
June, 2018
Volume 44, Number 2
  
6 February 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this November photo, Pope Tawadros II of Alexandria, patriarch of Egypt's Coptic Orthodox Church, conducts an interview at the Wadi Natrun Monastery in Cairo. (photo: CNS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany, Reuters)

Interview: Egypt’s Coptic pope criticizes Islamists (AP) Egypt’s Coptic patriarch delivered a cautious but unusually sharp criticism of the nation’s Islamist leadership in an interview with The Associated Press on Tuesday, dismissing the new constitution as discriminatory and rounds of national dialogues sponsored by the president as meaningless. Pope Tawadros II’s dive into politics came as he tried to energize the spiritual solidarity of a demoralized community with a visit to a historic monastery that no Coptic pontiff has been to in decades because of security tensions in southern Egypt. He joined the black-robed monks in a two-hour pre-dawn prayer at the ancient Virgin Mary chapel in the al Muharraq monastery, said to be on a site where the Virgin Mary took refuge with Jesus and her husband Joseph from Roman persecution. Tawadros has taken an unusually vocal political activist stance since being enthroned in November as the spiritual leader of the Copts, the main community of Egypt’s Christians…

Bulgaria stands by accusations that Hezbollah is behind bombing (Daily Star Lebanon) Bulgaria’s foreign minister defended himself Wednesday against accusations that Sofia lacked the proof to blame Hezbollah for a July bomb attack that killed five Israeli tourists and a Bulgarian. “If Bulgaria did not have enough arguments to announce yesterday that the traces in this attack lead to Hezbollah’s military wing, we would not have done it,” Nikolay Mladenov said on BNT television. Nearly seven months after the bombing of an Israeli tourist bus at the Black Sea airport of Burgas, Sofia on Tuesday had said two Canadian and Australia passport-holders with links to Hezbollah were to blame. This led to renewed calls from the United States, Israel and Canada on the European Union to designate Hezbollah as a “terrorist” organization…

Cairo activists fighting tear gas with tear gas (New York Times) As hundreds fled the advancing armored cars of riot police officers, Mohamed Mokbel ran forward. A veteran of two years of violent street protests, he pulled on his gas mask and charred protective gloves for another long night at his current vocation: throwing tear-gas canisters back at the riot police. “Whenever people lose hope, the clashes grow worse,” Mr. Mokbel, 30, said on a break from the fighting on Friday night outside the presidential palace. “But the people in power are still acting like there is no crisis, still firing more gas,” he said, “so I am going back in.” Two years after the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, waves of increasingly violent street protests have decimated tourism, slashed foreign investment, increased poverty and dashed hopes of a return to stability. In the last two weeks, more than 50 people have died in the clashes…

Christians of Syria protest kidnappings (Fides) In the province of Jazira, in Syria, the exponential increase in kidnappings — side effect of the Syrian conflict — continues to flog the civilian population even in areas not affected by the fighting between rebels and government troops. Most recently, a Christian pharmacist was kidnapped last Sunday for a ransom of one million Syrian pounds (almost €11,000 euro, or $14,000 U.S. dollars). On Friday, dozens of Christians improvised a roadblock burning tires at an intersection in the city of Hassake to protest against the kidnapping of the rector of the Euphrates University, who was taken in broad daylight by gunmen and released after two hours. In his case, the kidnapping was not inspired by financial reasons, but issues related to the functioning of the university — indicating that now one resorts to criminal practice of kidnapping to resolve conflicts with the abuse of personal and social interest…

Syrian rebels fight close to heart of Damascus (Reuters) Syrian rebels battled Bashar al Assad’s forces on the edge of central Damascus on Wednesday, opposition activists said, seeking to break his grip over districts leading to the heart of the capital. Their offensive aims to break a stalemate in the city of two million people, where artillery and air strikes have prevented opposition fighters entrenched to the east from advancing despite their capture of army fortifications, the activists said. “We have moved the battle to Jobar,” said Captain Islam Alloush of the rebel Islam Brigade, referring to a district which links rebel strongholds in the eastern suburbs with the central Abbasid Square. “The heaviest fighting is taking place in Jobar because it is the key to the heart of Damascus.” Assad, battling to crush a 22-month-old uprising in which 60,000 people have died, has lost control of large parts of the country but his forces, backed by air power, have so far kept rebels on the fringes of the capital…



Tags: Syria Egypt Syrian Civil War Coptic Orthodox Church Bulgaria