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‘Share the journey,’ embrace migrants, refugees, pope says

27 Sep 2017 – By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Christ calls believers to welcome migrants and refugees “with arms wide open, ready to give a sincere, affectionate, enveloping embrace,” Pope Francis said, launching the “Share the Journey” campaign of Catholic charities around the world.

Christians’ embrace of people fleeing war or poverty should be “a bit like the colonnade of St. Peter’s Square, which represents the mother church who embraces all in sharing a common journey,” the pope said at the end of his weekly general audience Sept. 27.

With hundreds of refugees and migrants present in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis said the Catholic charities’ staff and volunteers who assist them are “a sign of a church that seeks to be open, inclusive and welcoming.”

“Share the Journey” is a two-year campaign sponsored by Caritas Internationalis, the global network of national Catholic charities — including the U.S. Catholic Relief Services and Catholic Charities USA — to promote encounters between people on the move and people living in the countries they are leaving, passing through or arriving in.

Philippine Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila, president of Caritas Internationalis, told Catholic News Service, “‘Share the Journey’ is not just a title or a label for a program — it is that, but more than that, it is a lifestyle,” an affirmation that everyone wants and needs someone to share his or her journey through life.

“There are specific moments in the life of a person, a family or the whole human family when we need to be reminded of this fundamental truth that we have been given each other so that we would have someone to share our journeys with,” he said, the day before the campaign launched.

“A small gesture like extending one’s arm to somebody else — it means a lot,” he said. “I reach out and if a person feels alone and isolated, my reaching out is a gesture of solidarity. If I reach out and that person is wounded, it could be a sign of healing. If I reach out and the person is lost, it could mean an offer of guidance. If I reach out and person feels like nobody cares, then it will be a sign of welcome.”

In his ministry in the Philippines and traveling around the world for Caritas, Cardinal Tagle said he has come to realize that “we don’t need to do great, extraordinary, extravagant things to make a difference in the lives of people.”

Rather, he said, “small gestures, ordinary gestures, when done with sincerity, with the light of human understanding, with the fire of love can do extraordinary things.”

The cardinal said it is important for himself and for all Christians to look not only at the gestures of care and love they extend to others, but to recognize how “I have been assured and encouraged by little gestures that people have extended to me with sincerity and love.”

Those gestures, he said, “wow, they make my day, they make my journeys more pleasant and bearable.”





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