From ONE Magazine

More Paprika Recipes

Tisza Fisherman’s Soup

1 lb. whole small fish
1 whole carp or other large fish weighing 2 to 2.5 lbs.
Salt
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 tbs. slightly hot paprika
1 tomato, peeled and chopped
Half a cherry pepper (optional)
1 hot green pepper (Hungarians use a hot wax pepper)

Clean, gut and wash fish. Retain the blood of the fish and refrigerate, with the roe or milt. Cut off the head and tail of the carp. Save. Cut the body into strips about one inch wide (strips less than one inch are likely to disintegrate during cooking). Lightly salt the strips, cover and refrigerate for one to two hours.

Put the head and tail of the carp into a saucepan with the small fish. Add the onion, reserved blood and just enough cold water to cover the fish. Simmer gently for about one hour until the fish are reduced to a pulp. Strain through a fine sieve – don’t press. Add about one and a half pints of cold water to the strained pulp and bring to boil. Add the paprika, tomato, cherry pepper (if desired), salted fish slices and reserved roe or milt, cover the pan, and cook over low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until the fish is tender. Try not to stir the soup; instead, occasionally shake the saucepan gently.

The soup is best served in the pot to keep the fish from breaking up. Garnish with rings of green pepper.

Note: Be careful when using cherry pepper, as not everyone likes its hot taste. If it is very hot, the characteristic fish flavor will be lost.

Hungarian-style Gulyas (Goulash) Soup

For the porkolt (dry stew):

1 tbs. oil
1 medium onion
1 tsp. noble-sweet paprika
14 oz. beef or pork
1 green pepper
1 tomato
Salt

Also:
7 oz. of carrots and parsnips (mixed)
11 oz. of potatoes
Caraway seeds

To prepare the porkolt, wash the meat and cut it into one-inch cubes. Peel and chop the onion, core the green pepper and cut it into rings, and peel the tomato, remove the pips, and cut into thin strips. Saute the onion in the oil until it is just softened. Remove from the heat and sprinkle the paprika over the onion. Add the meat and fry over strong heat for a few minutes, stirring constantly. Add the green pepper and tomato, salt to taste, cover the pan, and braise in its own juices over moderate heat until almost tender.

Meanwhile, peel and slice the carrots and parsnips and peel and dice the potatoes. Add to the meat, then add about two pints of water. Season with a pinch of caraway seeds and simmer until everything is as soft as butter, adding more salt if needed.

Serve hot. Optional: Garnish with green pepper rings and serve cherry pepper on a separate plate.

Notes:
1. In some regions of Hungary, little pinched dumplings are added to the soup, which makes almost a meal in itself.
2. Gulyas soup should not be confused with gulyas; the latter is made without vegetables but with double the quantity of potatoes, cut into larger chunks.

Peppers Stuffed with Curds

8 oz. sheep curds, such as sheep ricotta (if not available, use a mixture of soft farmer’s cheese, feta and sour cream.)
4 oz. butter
4 fleshy peppers
1 onion
12-15 stalks of chives
1 tsp. mustard
1 tsp. noble-sweet paprika
1 tsp. paprika puree
_ tsp. ground caraway seeds
4 tbs. lager
Salt and pepper

Let the ricotta and butter sit at room temperature for an hour. Wash and core the peppers, removing the veins. Peel and grate the onion. Wash the chives, shake off the excess water and chop finely.

Beat the curds with the butter, onion, mustard, paprika, paprika puree, caraway seeds, lager and a little freshly milled pepper until creamy, then add the chives. Last, add salt. Taste before adding salt as several ingredients are salty in themselves.

Stuff the peppers with the curd mixture, packing it in well, then wrap the peppers in aluminum foil and refrigerate for at least two hours. To serve, cut the peppers into one-inch slices and place them on lettuce or vine leaves. Good served with fresh home-made bread, toast, or slices of rolls fried in garlic butter and tomatoes or green onions. They are excellent served with drinks and ideal for outings and picnics.

Variation: Pile the curd mixture into an attractive bowl, make a pattern on the top with a fork, and garnish with parsley or chives.